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Discussion Starter #1
Going to change the inner captive spring on the guide rod for a Colt Defender with wolf spring. Anyone who has done this....how do I get the "C" clip off the end of the plug? It appears to be a rather tricky and hazardous procedure. The spring has to be compressed enough to pull off the "C" clip. Couldn't they come up with a more complicated ordeal?

Is there an easy button you hit on this?
 

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Is your Defender having feed issues? I have a bunch of rounds on my New Agent and no probs. I'm going to put in a Kimber spring in when I decide the Colt unit is past its prime.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Go with what OD said.
I have one of those tools, however, it wont work. The clip is too tiny and has no holes in the ends to fit the tool even if the tool was smaller.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Is your Defender having feed issues? I have a bunch of rounds on my New Agent and no probs. I'm going to put in a Kimber spring in when I decide the Colt unit is past its prime.
I may end up putting a Kimber recoil assembly in the Colt for they are compatible and they are easier to dissemble. I have no problems, but lots of rds down range and was getting ducks in a row to get it up to snuff again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Here is what I got from another post, that I think I am going to go with. Just in case someone else faces this issue.

This shouldn't be that big of a deal, but it will require some care. I did a quick YouTube search, but didn't come up with anything. So, here's how I would do it:

Place the spring assembly into a folded rag and hold it securely with your weak hand. Or, if you have a vice that is suitable, open it up until its just wide enough to accept the spring assembly, and let the bottom of the spring rest on a hard surface.

If you can see well enough and work with a large Ziploc type bag over your hands, you may wish to do that in order to keep the clip from flying off into the wilderness. I don't usually use a bag; I work low on the screwdriver blade and block the clip with a strong hand finger.

With your weak hand fingers, carefully push or pull the retainer down just far enough to remove spring pressure from the clip. Apply the end of a small, flat blade screwdriver against the clip's edge opposite the clip opening and the retainer post. With gentle force, press down on the screwdriver and pry outward. The clip should back out far enough so that you can then insert the blade of the screwdriver between the clip and the post. Carefully, pry the clip off, being sure to block the clip's movement with your finger, or provide an obstacle (like working against a pillow or a rolled up blanket) that will limit the clip's flight, should it get away from you.

Gently release the retainer and remove the spring. When reinstalling the clip, depress the spring with the retainer again and guide the clip ends back into the retainer post groove. Keeping the spring slightly compressed, squeeze the clip onto the post with a small pair of needle nose pliers. After the clip is in place, gently squeeze the ends of the clip toward each other to ensure that they are tight in the groove.

I worked with small, precision television equipment for over 35 years, and I had to do a lot of this kind of stuff. If you're careful and patient, it's usually pretty easy.
 

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That does make it "tough and hazardous" as you stated. We have several names for those clips at work, none of them complimentary. They like to go into orbit.

Interested in what you come up with as a Colt Defender may be purchased shortly.

Wish I could be more help. Good luck.
 

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I have one of those tools, however, it wont work. The clip is too tiny and has no holes in the ends to fit the tool even if the tool was smaller.
Well, that would make huge difference! :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Got that sucker off after spending an hour tearing up my hands.....now to get the new one on.
 
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that is a C clip. usually there are spots along the curve where you can get a small screwdriver blade in to pry it out. I have never worked with that exact spring but all of those clips work the same way. One thing I always do is put a small earth magnet close by to grab it as soon as it gets loose. They sometimes fly off into somewhere in my work shop where I cant find it:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
that is a C clip. usually there are spots along the curve where you can get a small screwdriver blade in to pry it out. I have never worked with that exact spring but all of those clips work the same way. One thing I always do is put a small earth magnet close by to grab it as soon as it gets loose. They sometimes fly off into somewhere in my work shop where I cant find it:smile:
Great advice. I with help of wifey....her getting the C clip in the grove while I compressed the spring....made it happen. It's one of those things that when you do it once, second time is a lot easier. I know because I got the pad backward the first time. Thanks for all the advice....I now have fresh springs in the ole Defender and go the range tomorrow to test. Sure racks slide stiffer :smile:
 
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