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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, its too hot to go fishing, too hot to go to the range. I decided to reload a few in the mean time. So far, 400 45 Colt, 500 45 asp, 1,000 38 spl with hollow base wadcutters, 500 40 S&W, and now working on 357 mag. Various powders; Bullseye, VV 340, BE-86, Titegroup, and True Blue. Titgroup is quickly becoming one of my favorites. I had a 1/2 lb can of SR7625 that I used on the 45 Colt. BE-86 was used with 185 gr Gold Dot 45 acp,, also a very good powder, approximate velocity, 1,100 fps. I loaded an extra 500 45 acp light loads for my friends 1911 made in 1913. Still not finished. As soon as my MTM ammo boxes come in, I'm loading more 40 S&W, 38 spl. and 45 acp. It's a good thing I have plenty of primers before the shortage began! Among the primers are CCI, Winchester, Winchester Match, and Federal Match. The True Blue powder is kind of unique, it is a true spherical that I had to contact Dillon who sent me a special powder slide with tighter tolerances because the very tiny balls acts like miniture ball bearings and gums up a regular slide.
 

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Can't wait for primers and powder to become more available. At some point in the future when they become available and affordable again, I think I will definitely invest in a Dillon press.
You won’t regret it.
 
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Can't wait for primers and powder to become more available. At some point in the future when they become available and affordable again, I think I will definitely invest in a Dillon press.
I'd go for the 550C. I've had my 550B for close to 40 years now. It's still going strong. There is nothing better than their customer service.
 

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My reloading is on suspension for a while. Too hot and humid to go to the range. I'm more into rifle shooting and reloading than handgun shooting and reloading, and most of my current reloading is developing 6mm mongoose loads, so it doesn't pay off to load a large quantity only to fine out the load isn't good. Five to ten rounds of any particular loading is all I do, although I may make up a batch of five different loadings for testing.
 

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My reloading is on suspension for a while. Too hot and humid to go to the range. I'm more into rifle shooting and reloading than handgun shooting and reloading, and most of my current reloading is developing 6mm mongoose loads, so it doesn't pay off to load a large quantity only to fine out the load isn't good. Five to ten rounds of any particular loading is all I do, although I may make up a batch of five different loadings for testing.
I'm in that same boat except for pistol rounds. I don't want to load up 100 .357 with a bullet and powder combination that I've never used before just to find out that I could have done better.
 

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This is the time of year I do my handloads for practice thru the winter months.
I also put together my hunting loads and test them out around mid September.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm in that same boat except for pistol rounds. I don't want to load up 100 .357 with a bullet and powder combination that I've never used before just to find out that I could have done better.
When loading a new powder/bullet combination, I start near the lowest load and work up in 1 to 2 grain increments. I almost never load a round to its maximum load. One exception is Longshot. For some reason, it likes near full to full loads. I generally work for accuracy over speed.
 

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When loading a new powder/bullet combination, I start near the lowest load and work up in 1 to 2 grain increments. I almost never load a round to its maximum load. One exception is Longshot. For some reason, it likes near full to full loads. I generally work for accuracy over speed.
Generally, I back off about 10% of max.
 

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Can't wait for primers and powder to become more available. At some point in the future when they become available and affordable again, I think I will definitely invest in a Dillon press.
I just checked on PowderValley's website to see what primers are going for... Yikes! They're probably 3 times what I paid last time I bought some... I still have around 30-40K though, so I can wait...
 

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Somehow I made it through 49 years of reloading without a progressive machine. Still using my old RCBS (RockChucker and JR) and Lyman single-stage presses. Developed a method for producing in quantity by doing each step separately. Decap my brass, clean if needed, resize, expand case mouths, prime, then I have large quantities all ready to drop powder and seat bullets as needed for various uses. Most rifle calibers I produce in lots of 100 or 500, most handgun calibers in lots of 1000.

Each stage is usually done in a few hours during the evenings, so from start to finish a full run may take place over several days or even weeks, as I have the time and feel the inclination. I consider it a plus that each piece is handled a half-dozen times and can be physically inspected at each step of the process.

Bullet casting is usually done in the early morning hours. Two bottom-pour pots working and 3 or 4 molds. About an hour to get everything up to temp and ready to cast, then maybe 3 or 4 hours casting, rotating from one lead pot to another as I get down toward the bottom, then refilling the empty and let it come back to temp while using the other pot. I can usually make 1200 to 1500 bullets at a session, then separate by caliber, inspect, and have them ready for lube and sizing. When I have 1000-plus of a caliber I will set up the lubri-sizer for that bullet and run them all through in a few hours. Box them up and they will be ready for another batch of ammo when the time and mood are right.
 

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Somehow I made it through 49 years of reloading without a progressive machine. Still using my old RCBS (RockChucker and JR) and Lyman single-stage presses. Developed a method for producing in quantity by doing each step separately. Decap my brass, clean if needed, resize, expand case mouths, prime, then I have large quantities all ready to drop powder and seat bullets as needed for various uses. Most rifle calibers I produce in lots of 100 or 500, most handgun calibers in lots of 1000.

Each stage is usually done in a few hours during the evenings, so from start to finish a full run may take place over several days or even weeks, as I have the time and feel the inclination. I consider it a plus that each piece is handled a half-dozen times and can be physically inspected at each step of the process.

Bullet casting is usually done in the early morning hours. Two bottom-pour pots working and 3 or 4 molds. About an hour to get everything up to temp and ready to cast, then maybe 3 or 4 hours casting, rotating from one lead pot to another as I get down toward the bottom, then refilling the empty and let it come back to temp while using the other pot. I can usually make 1200 to 1500 bullets at a session, then separate by caliber, inspect, and have them ready for lube and sizing. When I have 1000-plus of a caliber I will set up the lubri-sizer for that bullet and run them all through in a few hours. Box them up and they will be ready for another batch of ammo when the time and mood are right.
That is similar to what I do. I decap any spent primers first on the Lee. Then they go into que for the tumbler. Trimming and flaring depend on what kind of loads are being made. Shells spend most of their time cleaned and sized.

How do you dial in the hardness of your lead?
 

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I've acquired a few 25 acp's over the years and have a bunch of spent cases. Finally picked up some dies and a hand primer. Should be interesting
 

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I've acquired a few 25 acp's over the years and have a bunch of spent cases. Finally picked up some dies and a hand primer. Should be interesting
Reloading .25 ACP is a young man's endeavor... No way I would do it with my old eyes and arthritic hands... .45-70 is probably more appropriate for my eyesight and hands these days... :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Reloading .25 ACP is a young man's endeavor... No way I would do it with my old eyes and arthritic hands... .45-70 is probably more appropriate for my eyesight and hands these days... :)
Well, a pound of powder will last forever! Isn't the primer diameter the same as the case?
 

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Well, a pound of powder will last forever! Isn't the primer diameter the same as the case?
Probably damn close... :)

If it was any smaller, it would be like loading a cap-and-ball with the ball sitting directly on top of the cap... :)
 

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Another fair weather shooter......

If it ain't raining you ain't training.


Too hot? must be getting soft in your old age.
 
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