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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just gave $250 to a man who can no longer reload due to injury.

I have everything I need to start reloading.....except the proper instruction.

I am not able to find anyplace even remotely close the Indianapolis area to learn how to reload ammunition.

Is anyone able to help me out with this problem?
 

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Steel - get books!!!!!

If you were close by I'd say - swing by here and I'll run you thru it all.

Go find ABC's of reloading - the old Dean Grenell book. Also get Lyman #48 (tho IMO #47 is better if you can find one). Get the 2nd Edition reload book by Richard Lee - and also maybe Speer #13.

Nothing about reloading is real hard but - you do need some intro info and I think books will be easiest - plus you need reload data on hand anyways.

Lee book and ABC's will together deal with much of the method.

If you have any real specific questions PM me - but several folks here reload too. Frankmako IIRC is another and Bud reloads too.
 

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Find an Indianapolis area gun club. If they're a successful club, they'll have good leadership and a good membership, someone will most likely be more than happy to give you a few pointers.
 

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As Chris said find the Lee loading Manaul and lyman 47 is prefered over 48 if you can only find 48 it will do


Reading the manual will give you the basics on how to do it set up is really trial and error

for die setting then its find your componats and load

Course try midwayusa they have videos on reloading if you would prefer something like that also
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
P95.....

P95Carry said:
.........books!!.....
Yeah, one of the items I got with my reloading package is 'Modern Reloading' by Richard Lee. Looks as if this book has been reprinted in 2001, retail cost $24.98.

I guess my hesitation from relying soley on books, is that a misload can result in deadly encounter.

If I cannot find a NRA course in reloading......I may just have to take you up on your offer and make a trek across Ohio to PA.
 

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Might be closer for ya to swing by me if need be ...

Main things i tell people to look for try ...etc


If it only came with a balance beam scale throw it far away get a digital


Ya didn't say what kind of press single stage ? turret? progressive?

Also what kind of powder measure it makes a big difference also at least i notice it


What will you load for pistol only or rifle
best thing to do is if you have something like a 38sp start with that caliber its very hard to mess up and super easy case to work with.

power and bullet selection is huge for a 38 which is good and bad when your starting out
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bud.........

1. Scale: I heard that too. Looking for a good digital scale.
2. Press: Progressive. Lee Pro 1000. Looking at a Dillon down the road. I got a couple rock chuckers too.
3. Powder measure: Lee Pro Auto-Disk.
4. Pistol loading for the moment. .38, .38 Spc., 9mm, .40, .45; planning rifle loading when I become comfortable with the handgun loads.
 

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I know Dillon has some instruction videos for their presses, but I'm sure they go over the general reloading process as well.

Perhaps some other companies have similar instructional videos.
 

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I'd learn everything using one of the Rock Chuckers. Much easier to learn and remember than when you're setting up a progressive. After you learn, you may or may not like the Pro 1000. Some people love them, some hate them. All progressives are different. If you like the Lee, great. If you don't -- that doesn't mean something else won't work.
Personally, I'd rather have a powder measure that is adjusted via a dial rather than changing out disks. I like the Redding 3BR, but it's expensive.
The Lyman book that others recommended really is all you need to learn. Reloading is extremely easy. I don't know why much of the industry acts like it takes a surgeon to do it.
 

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Steelhorse said:
1. Scale: I heard that too. Looking for a good digital scale.
2. Press: Progressive. Lee Pro 1000. Looking at a Dillon down the road. I got a couple rock chuckers too.
3. Powder measure: Lee Pro Auto-Disk.
4. Pistol loading for the moment. .38, .38 Spc., 9mm, .40, .45; planning rifle loading when I become comfortable with the handgun loads.

Look for a pact BBK scale can catch them for about 100$ on sale only bad thing with that model is 10-15 warm up time but for price i can live with it

I would start on the RockChucker while slow you will get how it should be done and less chances of double charge etc etc

Then when you decide to go progressive

I think Chris uses the lee so he can help ya with the actual set up with the press

the auto disks work fairly well certain powders leak no matter what titegroup is one


Ya got some easy calibers to start with start with 45acp and 38sp then 2 super easy calibers to load for


Hardest thing in beginning is trying to set the dies then its easy for 38-45 you have a wide range of powders you can use that will work in both cases

231
unique

are 2 i use a bunch and titegroup

unique would be a good powder to work with because its bulky so its a good starting powder
 

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Indeed as Bud says - I am stuck on Lee - too late to change but it suits me fine for what I need. Shoot me a PM is any major snags you find.

Agreed too on Unique - not the cleanest powder but one of the safer ones overall.

The auto-disk Lee measure is fine for most powders but I hate it for H-110 - leaks a lot!
 

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Beam scale works for me. Digitals are convenient - but will do nothing a good beam scale won't do. You might want to stick with the beam scale until you get into it for a little while - then make the decision on whether you need to drop the $100 for one. It is definitely not required to get started...
 

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I started reloading around 1973/74. I started out with a Lyman Spartan single stage press, Lyman carbide .357 mag dies, and a Lyman D-7 precision scale. Found a Lyman reloading handbook (1970) and a Speer Number Nine reloading manual (1973).

Then in 1980, I started NRA Silhouette competition shooting in El Paso Texas. Shot every silhouette match they had (rifle and pistol). My wife also shot every match. The only way to shoot this much was to reload. At this time I got one of the first Dillon 550 made and a high dollar Pro-Tach chronograph to test my loads.

Then I got into bullet casting. During the summer months I was at the reloading bench six days a week to keep up with the ammo that my wife and I needed for practice and matches. Pickup a second single stage press (Texas Star) for rifle loads. During the 80, I got in deep with the reloading, casting bullets, trimming brass, making up wildcat loads, testing loads, etc. But I love it.

Then we started shooting IPSC along with Silhouette. More reloading was needed and I love it. I use my Dillon for pistol only and the two single stage presses for rifle cases. Still use the old Lyman scales, no reason to change something that works. Got a RCBS powder drop and an old no name powder drop for rifle and they stays on weight. The Dillon drops on weight too. With the Dillon the best way is to have a complete tool head setup for each cal that you load. Love the set and leave it that the Dillon gives you, just change out tool heads to change cal. But a single stage press is the best way to learn how to reload.

These are the loads that I do: .25 acp, 380 auto, 38 Sp, 357 mag, 9mm/357 bitch (home made wildcat load, a long story), 9mm, 40 cal, 44 mag, 45 acp, 7mmTCU, 30-223, 7mm-308, 308, 30-06, and 5.56mm (223). I have work/tested most of the powders and bullets made and have found the ones that work well with above cals. I have match, practice, and protection load data for the above. This summer I am going to do a workup for the 9x18, (9mm Mak) with home made cast bullets.

When I started I took the book loads and work up or down from there. Made the reloads to fit each gun. Pro-Tach chronograph helped to workup a good load. If you need help let me known and I will be glad to give you my load data and tips.

frankmako


Frank - split this up a bit into para's - easier to read :smilez: - Chris
 
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