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Hi Guys: Was thinking about learning how to reload and I know nothing about it. Just wanting to reload 9,40,.380, 38 at this time can you steer me in the right direction. Retired and have nothing to do except clean the house and that is getting real old real quick but my wife is happy.:aargh4:
 

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If you need some brass, give me a holler. Other than that, I don't reload for pistol, but it seems all reloading components (other than bullets) appear to be short at this time. Maybe they are recovering like other things lately, but I think primers and powder are still rather hard to come by. May seem like a difficult time getting started, money wise and/or supplies wise. But if you shoot a lot, it would take a short time to pay off I would imagine. I handload for rifle cartridges, and I've been set on supplies for a very long time, back when factory rifle rounds were a dollar a piece or less, so I wouldn't have any suggestions as to what press and what all you'd want to look into, but most of the guys I know that do massive reloading use the Dillon stuff. If you just want to tinker and maybe make 50-100 rounds a day, and at less expense, might try the Lee Original loaders. I know they are still out there and still selling. I watch EBay sometimes, and thinking I might want to add the .223 to my reloading endeavors.
 

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grifft, I will try to find a few of the nicer articles for you on what exactly you need and what you don't. While the method is the same no matter what you do, the nuances change based on your equipment. It is always best to have someone show you how to do it, but it is not rocket science, and a quick video or a decent book will walk you through it.

I recommend starting with a nice single stage press. A good one will last you forever and you will always use it, even after you get a turret press.

You are going to need several recipe books for your loads. You always want to cross reference.

If you are set on just buying a progressive, I highly recommend the Dillon 550B.


Edit: I walked away halfway through typing and I see that links have been located. Good luck.
 

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Hi Guys: Was thinking about learning how to reload and I know nothing about it. Just wanting to reload 9,40,.380, 38 at this time can you steer me in the right direction. Retired and have nothing to do except clean the house and that is getting real old real quick but my wife is happy.
Start buy buying a current Lyman's Handbook and reading the instructional sections. Just my opinion, that's how I started a decade or so ago.

Beyond that, you'll need a couple hundred dollars worth of hardware, plus a die set for each cartridge you want to load.
 

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Start with a reloading manuel. It's a great hobby if you get into for the right reasons. You can get entire reloading kits that has about everything you need to get started except dies, primers, powder, bullets and brass.
 

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Start buy buying a current Lyman's Handbook and reading the instructional sections. Just my opinion, that's how I started a decade or so ago.

Beyond that, you'll need a couple hundred dollars worth of hardware, plus a die set for each cartridge you want to load.
+1 on the Lyman and particularly their pistol and revolver manual. Lyman is a little more focused on handguns because of their cast bullet heritage. I am 58 now and started loading for my Model 94 .32 special when I was 12 but I re-read and consult all my manuals regularly! The manual provides the "ounce of prevention for the pound of cure."
 

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question; magnum small pistol primers , can be used for what applications
magnum pistol such as .357.

they can be used for any pistol load if need be, but they burn hotter and longer than standard pistol, so the load would need to be reduced to maintain proper safety margins.

The problem is finding loading data that calls for magnum primers in non magnum applications,it is virtually non existent .

Definitely not recommended for beginning reloaders.
 

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There's many brands out there for reloading and all have their pluses and minuses. A single stage is simplier but slower. Are you planning to reload a lot or just something to do and pass the time? Is money a factor?

I don't reload mass quantities (50-100 rds at a time) but for me it's therapeutic. If I were to shoot thru 2-300 rounds at a time, I'd probably be looking into a progressive setup.
 

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I'm looking into getting into reloading as well. I'm going to take my time before making a purchase of a kit. I am highly interested in this thread, as I am in the same boat as the OP.
 

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Question: I rent a 2 br apartment. I'm thinking of reloading, but have some safety concerns about stray powder finding its way into the carpeting. Am I worrying too much? Can I just vacuum each reload session? Would setting up in the kitchen with tile floor be better, safety wise?
 

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Big problems may arise if you have more than a few grains of powder (powder measures can and do let some loose) dumped into a rug. Let's say you have an accident and a ounce or so lands in the carpet. You might wind up having a flaming inferno on your hands instead of a vacuum cleaner. Hard smooth surface is best.

bosco
 

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I'm curious. How do you propose the powder will ignite by vacuuming it up?

I've vacuumed more than a few grains several times from the carpet and never had a problem. I just don't see air lighting it up. You need spark man! Unless your vacuum is making sparks on the carpet, it will never ignite. And if your vaccum is making sparks, then you shouldn't be vacuuming the carpet with it to begin with.
 

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I'm curious. How do you propose the powder will ignite by vacuuming it up?

I've vacuumed more than a few grains several times from the carpet and never had a problem. I just don't see air lighting it up. You need spark man! Unless your vacuum is making sparks on the carpet, it will never ignite. And if your vaccum is making sparks, then you shouldn't be vacuuming the carpet with it to begin with.
Absolutely. Even if a few grains did find some way to ignite, all you'll have is a small flash, not an explosion of any kind.
 

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:haha: Amen!

The only way I could see a problem is if you had an unfiltered moter on the vacuum. If your vacuum is 40+ y/o then you MIGHT have a problem. Even the super cheap China crap have filters on them.
 

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As stated... "Let's say you have an accident and an ounce or so lands in the carpet."

Murphy's Law.

Beater bar revolving at high speed on carpet (rub a balloon on the carpet)...Static spark... Especially in low humidity..

No explosion mentioned..."flaming inferno"... Ignited ounce of powder with a rapid injection of air.

Only an opinion, but when working with powder I prefer to do it on a hard surface...I am sure a few grains would not cause a problem but a spill might.

bosco
 

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:haha: Amen!

The only way I could see a problem is if you had an unfiltered moter on the vacuum. If your vacuum is 40+ y/o then you MIGHT have a problem. Even the super cheap China crap have filters on them.
I just took a look at the vacuums in my house.. All three are modern (less than 10 years old) and are Hoover. All three do have filters granted. However the filters are all located AFTER the motor and impeller meaning that the powder must first go through the machinery before is forced into the filter.

I think this is why OSHA has rules about using certain types of vacuums when cleaning a range floor.

bosco
 

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I'm looking into getting into reloading as well. I'm going to take my time before making a purchase of a kit. I am highly interested in this thread, as I am in the same boat as the OP.
The search engine is your friend. There are quite a number of threads on this already. Start with the ones already provided, and search for more. Happy to answer specific question, but no sense spending time typing what has already been typed before.
 

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As stated... "Let's say you have an accident and an ounce or so lands in the carpet."

Murphy's Law.

Beater bar revolving at high speed on carpet (rub a balloon on the carpet)...Static spark... Especially in low humidity..

No explosion mentioned..."flaming inferno"... Ignited ounce of powder with a rapid injection of air.

Only an opinion, but when working with powder I prefer to do it on a hard surface...I am sure a few grains would not cause a problem but a spill might.

bosco
Easy solution - turn off the beater bar. :wave:
 
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