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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
After several years, and time spent searching for spring end cap under furniture when I don't catch it on disassembly, I am thinking about swapping. I hate the long springs used now. I have had several 1911's in the past with the G.I. two spring setup. Never failed. The reason for the single long spring I haven't understood. I've read swapping it will work, and read it won't be reliable, for whatever reason. I'm not exactly sure what would be required parts-wise, other than the springs, and guessing the end cap somehow.

Ideas? Experience with it?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
??? I don't recall a GI 1911 ever using a 2-spring arrangement for the recoil spring. The "long-ass" spring is the default design standard for the 1911.

Sorry, I meant to original setup didn't have the long guide rod, like many do now. Unfortunately, I think it's Kimber's own design is the problem. I.E. a Press-check isn't simple like an older Colt. Their damn cap is good for cutting fingers and not much else. Unless there is some other way to disassemble it that they don't publish. I'll try rdtompki's suggestion, instead of trying to use their tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Unload gun, rest in the vertical on the bench, push down on the recoil spring plug with the left thumb, turn the bushing with the right thumb, slowly release spring pressure with the left thumb/hand.
Thanks, I'll try this. Their bushing 'tool' is a pain in the ass.
 

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Greetings and Merry Christmas. I had occasion to deal with this issue when the son in law friend was having trouble with the firearm not returning to battery requiring a "thumb shove" to complete the action. Wulff springs had the exactly right spring about 2 pounds heavier to replace the stock spring....about $15 I think. I gave my son in law the usual deal....I'll fix it and you can decide....I will keep the pistol or you can pay for the repair...he chose wisely. I gave him the original spring to put in when the piece wore in properly (it was pretty new). I am not a gunsmith or mechanic and thought the replacement was straight forward...took about five minutes. As a confirmed 1911 user I learned long ago to maintain control over the spring cap when disassembling the pistol....no biggy now. Hope this helps. And again, Merry Christmas.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Greetings and Merry Christmas. I had occasion to deal with this issue when the son in law friend was having trouble with the firearm not returning to battery requiring a "thumb shove" to complete the action. Wulff springs had the exactly right spring about 2 pounds heavier to replace the stock spring....about $15 I think. I gave my son in law the usual deal....I'll fix it and you can decide....I will keep the pistol or you can pay for the repair...he chose wisely. I gave him the original spring to put in when the piece wore in properly (it was pretty new). I am not a gunsmith or mechanic and thought the replacement was straight forward...took about five minutes. As a confirmed 1911 user I learned long ago to maintain control over the spring cap when disassembling the pistol....no biggy now. Hope this helps. And again, Merry Christmas.
I may have forgotten how the full size 1911 disassembly worked first time I tore this thing down several years ago, and just stayed frustrated with it. I seriously don't remember my Colt's being such a pain. However, I spent many years between my older 1911's, and this one, with smaller Kimber 45's which have a totally different method. Great guns, but they love to come up with different ways to disassemble.
 

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I may have forgotten how the full size 1911 disassembly worked first time I tore this thing down several years ago, and just stayed frustrated with it. I seriously don't remember my Colt's being such a pain. However, I spent many years between my older 1911's, and this one, with smaller Kimber 45's which have a totally different method. Great guns, but they love to come up with different ways to disassemble.
Make it easy on yourself, replace the full length guide and it's cap for the USGI style guide rod and it's solid cap. :wink: https://www.edbrown.com/product/recoil-spring-guide/ https://www.edbrown.com/product/recoil-spring-plug/
 

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Yeah, I got frustrated with the full length guide rod on my Springfield. I swapped it for a Wilson Combat set with a short (Govt length) and plug...works great.

My 4in Kimber is built with a bushing less bull barrel. It demands a wire takedown tool...or a bent paperclip for disassembly. Not as elegant as the plug, but not really any big deal.
 

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My Springfield TRP and Trophy Match both got the GI parts for FLGR replacement "therapy."

My 4" Kimber CDP II has a bushingless barrel. I have the Wilson P/N 651 kit with flat wire spring, guide rod (one piece, and shorter than the Kimber's) and spring plug on hand for when the OEM spring needs to be replaced (coming soon, gun is at around 2500 rounds). Allegedly, disassembly does not require tools, and I sure as heck hope that's the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah, I got frustrated with the full length guide rod on my Springfield. I swapped it for a Wilson Combat set with a short (Govt length) and plug...works great.

My 4in Kimber is built with a bushing less bull barrel. It demands a wire takedown tool...or a bent paperclip for disassembly. Not as elegant as the plug, but not really any big deal.

That's one thing I disliked about the smaller length. I hated to either always remember the little tool, or sometimes couldn't find a paperclip to use. I don't know if it was their only design option or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Make it easy on yourself, replace the full length guide and it's cap for the USGI style guide rod and it's solid cap. :wink: https://www.edbrown.com/product/recoil-spring-guide/ https://www.edbrown.com/product/recoil-spring-plug/
Thank you, that's what I was meaning from the start. I didn't mean two springs, just the flex of the GI style vs long guide rod, which brought about the FLGR, for the reason of .... ? Do you know if just replacing the spring plug and shorter guide rod is enough? The stock barrel bushing should work ok? I've just been ignoring this in frustration, instead of dealing with it when I bought it.

Thanks Guys, I greatly appreciate it.
 

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From a strictly mechanical perspective, we design coil springs to maintain their shape under compression - no sideways deflection. But with long, skinny springs such as recoil springs in semiauto firearms - rifles and handguns - that's just unrealistic. In actual operation, the amount of sideways spring deflection with a FLGR as opposed to the stubby GI guide rod amounts to a third decimal place effect with regard to their force-deflection characteristics. Discussions regarding the effectiveness of FLFRs approaches "caliber wars" from what I've seen, heard and read.
 

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From a strictly mechanical perspective, we design coil springs to maintain their shape under compression - no sideways deflection. But with long, skinny springs such as recoil springs in semiauto firearms - rifles and handguns - that's just unrealistic. In actual operation, the amount of sideways spring deflection with a FLGR as opposed to the stubby GI guide rod amounts to a third decimal place effect with regard to their force-deflection characteristics. Discussions regarding the effectiveness of FLFRs approaches "caliber wars" from what I've seen, heard and read.
:congrats:
 
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