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I have 2 Ruger 10-22's and I want to start modifying one to increase the accuracy. I love the ruger's as they are cheap, easy and fun to shoot, but they are not known for high accuracy. 10-22's are also known to be easily modified as well.

I am looking for some suggestions on what to do to really kick the accuracy up. If I want to get a new barrel for it, what is recommended for that pinpoint accuracy I would like.

What other suggestions are there to make it as accurate as possible?
 

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The 10/22 trigger is my biggest complaint. I would start there.
 

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Being mostly broke, I took my stock Ruger apart and polished the trigger and sear and have a much improved trigger at no cost [I already had the hard stones].

The Ruger barrel is easily changed, a heavier profile will require a new stock or inletting the barrel. If you want to use a sling you will want a stock designed to support the tension of a tight sling.

The easy way is to replace the trigger housing with an after-market unit or just upgrade the components. Brownell's has all the parts you might want as does Midway
 

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I bought a 10-22 a few years ago just to modify. Was gonna go heavy barrel and stock trigger etc.
But I thought I should have a baseline for what the improvement was, so I threw a good scope on it and went shooting.
End result on my rifle was really tight groups at 75 yards. The trigger did get some work, and I'm still considering replacing it but the accuracy on this one stopped me from changing much else. Maybe I just got a good one, but how does your rifle shoot now?
 

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I build 10/22's on a regular basis. 10/22's payed for a new mustang and a new ranger... I've done a few of 'em.

The biggest mistake people make is buying all sorts of fancy and expensive parts, yet forget about the most important stuff; the scope mount and scope.
Get a nice one piece base, rings and a good scope. (Dont be tempted to skimp) Millet and Bushnell both make a great scope for not a lot of cash. Of course, the sky is the limit.

Rebarrel; Green Mountain, Tactical Solutions and the lowly Butler Creeks are my favorites. Barrel changes are easy, just make sure you tighten the two bolts in the block evenly. And use quality ammo. For plinking and hunting, I prefer Green Tags. There are more expensive options, but I've found that the green tags have a nice balance of power and precision; and they are easy to find. Stay away from the hyper velocity rounds such as the Stingers. You do loose a good bit of accuracy with them.

Stocks; there are a lot of good options. Fancy custom laminates to the Hogue overmolds. Personally, I like the Hogues. My 10/22 "Sixto's Squirrel Special" sports the Hogue, its a great stock that is tough as nails. Perfect for hunting IMO. (the "squirrel special" has a Butler Creek .920 a one piece scope mount, Hogue stock... less than $200 in aftermarket parts, it will bust TicTacs at 30 yds easily if you do your part.)

Trigger groups; You can do a lot with the stock trigger, you may want to monkey around with it a little prior to spending a lot of cash on a new trigger group. There are a few good ones out there, but IMO, the best is still the Volquartsen. Its pricey, but its good stuff.
 

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What kind of price range could you expect on a reliability/accuracy/working gun mod on a 10/22, Sixto? What kind of mods should the OP and others make essential and what should they cut?
 

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What kind of price range could you expect on a reliability/accuracy/working gun mod on a 10/22, Sixto? What kind of mods should the OP and others make essential and what should they cut?
I would think that $500. for the base gun, barrel and scope mounts and stock would be about right. If you have good resources, that money can go a lot further.

I remember a time when I could buy base 10/22 for a hundred and change.:frown:

Essential mods are a barrel stock and scope mounts. The rest would depend on application. For a hunting gun, I'd say skip a trigger group and spend the money on a lighter barrel, like one from TacSol. Where as a bench gun put the money in the trigger and stock.

Buy a good scope! The most common mistake is putting junk glass on a good rifle.

Also, depending on application too, the glass can cost as much or more than your modded out rifle.

Another thing to consider (and be honest with yourself) is your ability. A lot of guys go and toss a ton of cash into a rifle that they can't shoot to its full potential stock. The cool thing about a 10/22, it can grow as your ability does. Don't go build yourself the most accurate 10/22 in the world if you are not the most accurate shooter. You're just setting yourself up for frustration.
 

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Start first with a bull barrel. The Butler Creek is a good one and can be had for less than a 100 bill. Most of the aftermarkets have tighter chambers for better accuracy.

Forget the receiver rail. Add an after market Weaver or Pictatinny and make sure it uses one inch bases that screw directly to the receiver. It'll make your scope mount much more rigid.

Most people use cheapo scopes. Don't do it. If you use a .22 for squirrel hunting, most of your shots will be in the dark woods. Get a good scope, I like the Nikon's. They have a lot of light transmission and they are cheaper than Leupolds.

Now that you have your bull barrel, your stock, and a good scope, sit down with a bench rest and shoot every kind of ammo that is available to you. Expect to take time and write the load on each target. Zero at 25 and go to 50

You gun will like some loads better than others and one load will shoot tighter than all the rest. Figure it out. Experiment.

Then buy a few bricks of it and use it exclusively. Zero your scope for 50 yards and shoot at 75 and 100 yards and notice the drop. Remember it.

Eventually, you'll want to do something with the trigger. There are several good aftermarkets if you are willing to spend the money, otherwise Midway sells parts like hammers and triggers that can make it alot better for not so much money.
 

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Another thing to consider (and be honest with yourself) is your ability. A lot of guys go and toss a ton of cash into a rifle that they can't shoot to its full potential stock. The cool thing about a 10/22, it can grow as your ability does. Don't go build yourself the most accurate 10/22 in the world if you are not the most accurate shooter. You're just setting yourself up for frustration.
This is so true!! Im a fair shot and have seen jaws drop when a lowly semi modded marlin, or that norinco jw15 out shoots some one with a tricked out 10/22.
 

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If you don't have one of the Ruger 10/22T models already, then might try a heavy barrel. If you remain stock with the barrel, or even upgrade to a Butler Creek, or Green Mountain barrel, you're still only getting better with little investment. Better accuracy is going to come with a bigger price tag. Stock and barrel mainly.....the rest can be DIY. Threading your receiver for a threaded barrel would be tops in my book. Then proper bedding. Removing any slack in the action such as over sized trigger housing pins and the like. Both of my basic Target model Ruger 10/22s have pretty much been tack drivers since they were completely stock, and they are even better now. Both are 10 years old or better. I hear today's offerings leave a lot to be desired. Rimfirecentral.com is an excellent resource for the 10/22 owner who wants to mod. Stick with the ammo that gives you best results. Ammo alone will be your biggest factor for accuracy when you've done everything else you can do.
 

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I dunno RamRod, if I were going to go through the trouble and thread the receiver, I'd probably just start out with an aftermarket one. It would probably be cheaper and less hassle in the long run.
I also prefer a free float barrel, most of the 10/22 barrels are short and light enough that makes it the way to go on a plinker or hunting gun.
Now if we're talking a bench gun like the 10/22T, then by all means, bed it!
 
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