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I have got this gnawing urge to pick up a S&W 625 revolver. I have not had a chance to shoot one but I love 45s and enjoy revolvers. So it seems like a win win situation. So those that have this pistol or have owned one let me know what your likes and dislikes are. Also 4" or 5" barrel. Both look nice but I may have not handled them yet. I would like to So please open those knowledgeable minds and share with me.
Mike
 

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I have a 625 and a 25. Love them both. My 625 is a 5 inch and is a tack driver. I get great groups with it. Get some good quality moon clips and a tool to make your life easier. I typically load up 100 or more rounds on clips at a time and the demooning tool is a great thing when removing all that brass. :image035:

I would say get one. As to 4" vs 5" that is a personal decision. Get the one that feels best for you. I know the 4" is popular because of IDPA. The 5" is no longer allowed for IDPA, unless they changed the rules again.

-Scott-
 

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I'm a big 625 fan myself....as well as a fan of the (now discontinued) S&W 610 in 10mm.
 

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Mike - my 625 is a dash 6 and so has that unfortunate spider hole but - it will not be carry so - no biggie really.

I chose 5" and the thing shoots just dandy - way too much fun actually with a concommitant reflection on my ammo expenditure! I doubt actually you'd find either 4" or 5" other than enjoyable - I kid myself the 5" is a shade more accurate!!


 

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Hello. I, too, am a fan of the Model 625. I only own one, but it's the same one I bought NIB years ago.


I have the 5" version and prefer it. A friend had both the four and five inch guns; we couldn't shoot one better than the other. My gun is stock as I simply have not found grips that suit me better than those that came on the revolver.

I shot one of these that had had a scope mounted on it and fired from a rest. That and subsequent experiences showed me a couple of things right off the bat:

1. The Model 625 is capable of extreme accuracy with loads it "likes" and will group very well with about anything out to about 25 yards. At 50 yards and farther, the "liked loads" will do better. It seems that each gun is a law unto itself about which load it actually likes best.

2. The human error I introduced even from a rest and using a scope is without question the major cause of groups spreading out. I think we might all be surprised at how much error we bring into the accuracy equation; I know that I sure do.

The double-action pull on my Model 625 is heavier than on other N-frames I own. I've read or heard that this is because:

1. The gun will fire .45 ACP with moon clips in different variations and there can be some spring in these clips which holds the cartridges slightly away from the rear of the cylinder such that the firing pin must not only detonate the primer, but push the cartridge forward before doing so.

2. Some military .45 ACP primers are harder than others.

I lean more toward the first reason. I have never tested .45 ACP military primers for hardness, but if commercial primers can vary, I reckon it's not far-fetched to assume that the same could be true of military .45 primers. (I know it's true with some military .223 when trying to fire it in some bolt guns.[/i]

Ejection is usually very sure and very positive due to the short case length of the ACP or AR cartridges and I find the felt recoil out of the big N-frame with its heavy barrel and full length underlug to be noticeably less than when fired from a 5" 1911 type pistol.

Lots of folks use the ACP rounds as their primary loads for the Model 625. Since I don't use mine for defense, I went primarily with the AR cases and generally use a 250-260-gr. hard cast SWC. I've read that the rifling is shallow and that cast bullets are not supposed to group well from this revolver, but such has not been the case in mine or a few others I've seen shot over the years.

If a person uses AR cases, it might be possible to lighten the double-action pull as the case would seat against a thick rim as do other revolver cartridges. I've not experimented any along these lines as I'm happy with the gun as is.


For those wanting to use AR cases, HKS does make speedloaders for them. In this picture, one is loaded with Corbon's DPX load while th other a 250-gr. handload.

Out of my 5" Model 625, I got the following average velocities based on 10 shots fired 10' from the chronograph screen:

Kead 255-gr. CSWC
6.0 gr. Unique
R-P cases
WLP primer

Average Velocity: 860 ft/sec
Extreme Spread: 32
Std. Deviation: 12

Speer 230-gr. Gold Dot
7.0 gr. Unique
R-P cases
WLP primer

Average Velocity: 937 ft/sec
Extreme Spread: 35
Std. Deviation: 12

Corbon 160-gr. DPX:
Average Velocity: 1108 ft./sec
Extreme Spread: 37
Std. Deviation: 12

Remington 230-gr. GS:
Average Velocity: 840 ft/sec
Extreme Spread: 6
Std. Deviation: 3

Winchester USA 230-gr. FMJ:
Average Velocity: 804 ft/sec
Extreme Spread: 14
Std. Deviation: 5

From what I've seen and experienced, at least with the 5" gun, if one is good enough, he should be able to literally chew out the X-ring; sadly I cannot do that well, but it is reassuring to know that the intrincsic accuracy of the revolver can.

I truly think that if a person shoots this revolver, he or she will become a convert. I also think that if one opts to do so, get an de-mooning tool for the inevitiable use of .45 ACP ammo.


Here is a half-moon clip of .45 ACP ammunition. These are available as are full-moon clips and at one time I saw some that held 2 cartridges. I don't know if they're still available. Using moon clips allows for the use of a wide variety of high-performance .45 ACP rounds in the revolver, a very good thing in my view.

Another thing that I appreciate the N-frame Model 625 for is that it can be shot and shot and shot with full-power .45 ACP factory or handloaded ammunition without concerns of shooting the gun "loose" as can happen with certain magnum calibers.

Best.
 

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....no one can blame you for the lack of objectivity when it comes to this gun....it's another fine example of S&W workmanship and quality.....one that I need to add to my collection.
 

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My thx too Steve for your usual excellent input.

srfl - without putting myself on the spot too much - I will reckon that should you aquire one - you will like it a lot. It'll be a nice addition to the collection.

Oh sorry - ''your accumulation'' :18:
 

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What a great revolver!

Mr. Camp's review is excellent and accurate.

I will add the following about the DA trigger pull.
They can easily be smoothed and lightened by the average guy. There are several threads on the Smith forum telling "how to". No great mechanical knowledge is required. Patience is a virtue when smoothing triggers.

My 5" 625 DA pull is 6 1/2 lbs and smooth as butter. Randy Lee at Apex in CA. has worked competition 625's down to 3 1/2 lbs DA with reliable function. These lighter pulls are for competition and require Federal primers for reliable ignition.

8 lbs DA pull for a carry revolver is easy to obtain and reliable with normal factory ammo.

The Kuhnhausen book on S&W revolvers is a handy guide to help you understand the innards and how they work.
Dave
 

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This would be a great house gun. I think Revolvers are more suited for house guns but, need a large caliber like the .45 to balance the small amount of rounds..:yup:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Wow not 1 negative comment. Sounds like I am going to have to save a few penny up and get one. Thanks for all the info guys.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Stephen
Thanks for sharing your enthusiasm with me. I am sure I will be picking a 625 up before long.
Mike
 
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