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I'm not exactly sure if this is permissible, I get mixed feedback from different sites, but I'm looking for suggestions. I have searched through lots of threads and didn't see anything recent.

Does anyone have a suggestion for a home safe? This will be inside the house. There is really only one constraint I won't go into detail about other than it be larger than 22 inches wide.

I would like a few shelves because I have more hand guns than long guns. I saw one somewhere (I can't find again) that gave you an option for all shelves or set up for all rifles.
 

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Why do you want a safe? Theft? Children? Fire? What kind of lock? There are so many options that without a little more information it's difficult to suggest anything.
 

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I saw Liberty safe in California that had customer options when it came to measurements.
Their web site says that your size will be what they make.
I would also urge you to make sure that you only need 22 inches wide.
Mine is 37 wide and was filled rather quickly when I thought I would only need 24.
Local gun shows in your county might be somewhere you might go before you buy.
That is my two cents worth. BTW! I own Fort Knox and not affiliated other than a really satisfied customer.
Tom TKH
 

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There is really only one constraint I won't go into detail about other than it be larger than 22 inches wide.
You sure you didn't mean it can't be wider than 22"? Otherwise, that' not a limitation. The safes that are narrower than 22" are the exception and not the norm.

I'll also echo what @arte710 said. You have to determine the purpose and what is important to you. You can get a safe for less than $500, but it won't be very good at fire protection and won't put up much of a fight for a determined person trying to get into it. But, if your only purpose is to keep your weapons away from little ones in your house, something like that might be acceptable.
 

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Set a list of needs based on your collection size, value, and the risks to it.
Maximum price
Maximum + Minimum size (don't forget about space required to get into position)
Fire
Water
Security
Entry method
Features & Finish & Interior
Weight limits
 

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I go against the grain on this. IMO the big heavy safes are a needless carryover to feel safe, not actually be safe. Most aren’t as fire nor intrusion resistant as they claim.

With how frequent we move (averaged every two years for approaching the past 30 years) I’ve preferred multiple light and smaller locking cabinets over a single big safe. I bolt them down around the house, making theft harder. It also makes moving less difficult than dealing with something requiring a crane.
 

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Hard to say without knowing more info. This video has a lot of good info. Liberty makes good safes. A lot of people recommend them, but they make everything from the lowest to highest quality. A lot more to look at than the brand logo on the front.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GHAyRO566sU
 

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After 20+ years in the alarm industry and seeing a LOT of "gun" safes after a house fire not one of them came through without damage to the contents.

Don't count on a gun safe to protect your guns from a fire.
 
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After 20+ years in the alarm industry and seeing a LOT of "gun" safes after a house fire not one of them came through without damage to the contents.

Don't count on a gun safe to protect your guns from a fire.
Most people buy cheap safes from big chain sporting goods stores. Look up how the liberty presidential fared in the California wildfires. You get what you pay for.
 

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Another source for information on safes: https://gunsafereviewsguy.com/

Once you decide on your budget, then decide what features are most important, like fire resistance or burglary resistance and then you can start narrowing it down. Personally, I like a mechanical dial (GroupII or better UL listing) for reliability and long life expectancy and as thick of steel as possible. Sturdy Safe comes to mind. Fireproofing I like the cement slurry between the inner and outer walls walls instead of sheet-rock, but that will usually cost you a premium. AMSEC uses this. In the long run you will get what you pay for with something in every price range. Good Luck!
 

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After 20+ years in the alarm industry and seeing a LOT of "gun" safes after a house fire not one of them came through without damage to the contents.

Don't count on a gun safe to protect your guns from a fire.

yeah really... its just an oven
 

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I lucked into under-floor safes web pages two nights ago. Placed in-ground under a concrete floor, these are largely fireproof, cannot be removed and are inherently very difficult to break into. Flush with concrete floor, can cover with vct or carpet squares flooring and they disappear. Wouldn’t it suck to forget where you hid it?

They are NOT water proof, so if in an area where floor could collect water atop the safe there’s exposure. Lots of sizes and profiles.
 

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I lucked into under-floor safes web pages two nights ago.
The last house we lived in had an under-floor safe. It was well hidden under the carpet in a corner of our walk in closet. It stuck down into the crawl space, not embedded in concrete, but even so, IT STUNK! Mildew in that thing was a serious problem. We only used it to store guns when we were going to be away from home for more than one day.

I will add that the real safe we have now would grow mold quickly also if we did not keep several nylon knee high stockings filled with silicon desiccant pellets in it - and take them out to bake/dry/refresh them every several days. Heck, we even keep our clothes closet doors open so our clothes do not grow mold on them and we do not live in a really high humidity area!
 

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The last house we lived in had an under-floor safe. It was well hidden under the carpet in a corner of our walk in closet. It stuck down into the crawl space, not embedded in concrete, but even so, IT STUNK! Mildew in that thing was a serious problem. We only used it to store guns when we were going to be away from home for more than one day.

I will add that the real safe we have now would grow mold quickly also if we did not keep several nylon knee high stockings filled with silicon desiccant pellets in it - and take them out to bake/dry/refresh them every several days. Heck, we even keep our clothes closet doors open so our clothes do not grow mold on them and we do not live in a really high humidity area!
Can you put a dehumidifier inside?
 
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I installed a floor safe this week. A Sentry Safe by Master, the instructions say to open it every week or two to dry it out. The safe came with a large desiccant package, and the instructions say to maintain it in there as “the humidifier”. They state their proprietary insulation gives off moisture.
 

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Can you put a dehumidifier inside?
If you mean a heat stick which is called a dehumidifier but does nothing except heat the air in the safe, no. We tried the plastic "dehumidifier" packets that you supposedly plug into a wall socket when they turn dark color. They are so small they do absolutely nothing at all except waste your money. They contain very small amounts of the desiccant granules, so why not buy the granules in bulk and use enough to do the job properly?

If we had a place in the house proper - on a wood floor, not on a cement floor - we would not have to refresh the granules as often, but we do not have any place in the house proper to put the safe.

Like many others: We do what we need to do.
 
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I'm on my 2nd safe in 35 years time. Both fairly large safes.
The first one had an electronic keypad...not the type you see these days...and after 20 years with it the keypad failed. I found that the builder had sold the company to a safe company in Fort Worth years prior so I called them. Then I called a professional safe cracker, a guy who installs bank vaults and safe deposit systems.

Every possible remedy was tried to open the safe and I finally had to do what the safe company in Ft Wth suggested and rent a commercial grade grinder with a cutting disc and cut the entire lock mechanism out of the door. Once I had a big hole in the door I simply reached inside and moved the mechanism to move the lock bolts and opened it up. Of course the safe was trashed...I sold it for scrap.

And, of course, the failure occurred the night before I was leaving for opening weekend of white tail season so I couldn't access any of my hunting firearms gear and had to scramble at late night and borrow a rifle to hunt that weekend. (I ended up getting two does and a hog that weekend btw)

I replaced that safe with a Liberty/Franklin and have been very happy with it. Standard dial lock. No more electronics for me.

My son has a safe with an electronic lock, but it is a newer build and the keypad is replaceable. His failed about a year ago and he had to order a new keypad. But once he hooked it up he was able to open the safe. Still...a bit of a PITB.
 

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Safe suggestions:

1. Get more than you think you will need. If a 8 or 10 gun safe will take care of your immediate needs, consider a 12 or 14 gun safe to take care of future needs.

2. Mama will want to take up considerable room in your new safe, so make sure she has room for all of her stuff. Otherwise you can just get her a new safe when you buy your new safe.

3. Pay the dealer's price for delivery and installation. Please don't consider wrestling that big iron pig around by yourself, or even with a couple of your buddies to help.

4. Add a workers' compensation endorsement to your homeowners insurance policy, just in case a couple of your neighbors try to steal your safe and rupture their nut sacks or have it fall over on them while they are stealing your stuff. This is the 21st Century after all, and even burglars and thieves deserve proper insurance coverage. Their lawyer may go lightly on you while concentrating attention on your insurance company.

5. When it is time to move try to sell the safe with the house. Probably a lot easier and less expensive than having it moved to your new house.
 
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