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YES

I answer, N/A or (Not Applicable).
Because they don't have N/Y/B. Or (None of Your Beeswax) section.
 

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I answer "No."
 

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Our Southern rural school does not have such inquries...it they did, they would only want to be sure that you had ENOUGH firepower at home.:comeandgetsome::smoke23:
The day my doctor asks about my firearms is the day that I change doctors.:yup:
 

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I don't have school age children so don't know what kind of questions might be ask. As for a doctor. Well that is a question that will be left blank. It's none of his business.
 

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I live in a small rural town. It's pretty much assumed that everyone owns a gun of some type. The ones that don't are the odd ones.
My doc is an ex-navy doc that likes to shoot and hunt. My kid's pediatrician asked and I told him it wasn't any of his business. He apologized and said it was reccomended questions from the AMA.
 

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I have never heard of this question being asked by a doctor.
 

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It's catching on everywhere. People who have never held a firearm or received any training are now sticking their noses in peoples business. I've heard Peds Docs are really grilling parents on ownership.

The answer for me is simple .Tell them it's none of their business. Medical professionals are everywhere. Just get a new one.
 

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Since this is the second thread on this issue in 2 days, and I refrained from the first, I just want to give a little insight. I don't expect you to answer any differently, other than hopefully answering more politely than some of the responses I've seen. Anyways, a little background--I'm about to finish up medical school. For the first two years, I learned "academia medicine". When I finally got into my third year, I was grateful I could finally learn "practical" medicine; instead, what I've had to learn is what I'm calling and telling my patients, that this is "legal medicine." I'll get back to that in a second. In our full History and Physical's that we have to do, there is a "social history" section in addition to the past-medical/surgical and so forth. The social section is where this question would go; the others we ask about are if you are married/single, have children, type of work/retired/disabled, live with others, and of course the tobacco/alcohol and illicit drug use. It's often rare when we have to really rely on these, but they are used big time on our boards. For example, if you got some kind of lung cancer going on--smoking; or if we think it's asbestos, and we're wondering where in the hell could you have picked that up--if I look back in your chart and see you worked on a ship-yard, that will lead me into ruling out mesothelioma. That is a classical board type question--and the only clues to answering the question of "what type of cancer should you rule-out and how" are the "worked in ship-yard" and "cough." Immediately I'd know to scan your lungs to rule-out mesothelioma.

Now personally, I've not asked about the firearms in the house, but there are times when I should have. Think about it in this way if you will for a moment: I just diagnosed you with a major depression episode during a routine office visit (and this does happen often). I start you on an anti-depressant; let's use prozac as an example. With depression, sometimes you can be completely drained of energy that you can't do anything; well, the prozac starts to kick in after about 3 weeks, and you're finally getting enough energy to get off the couch, get your gun, and kill yourself. I didn't ask you about having a gun in your home, so your wife wants someone to blame (or your insurance policy wasn't big enough or didn't cover suicide), and she sues the f*** outta me. But, if I had asked about firearms/weapons in the house, I would have been somewhat protected because that would be in my note/H&P. Or, in this case, I could have looked back at the questionnaire which makes things like this quicker to assess, and see if you had firearms/weapons in your home. That is basically combining my "legal" and "practical" medicine into one.

Just a couple facts: asking about firearms is on the "suicide risk assessment" that we're supposed to do to assess whether or not you're going to kill yourself; also, the person most likely to commit suicide is the older, white male. With depression, it happens a lot of times just like the case above, when you're finally getting enough energy to actually carry out the plan you made when you had no energy to actually do it.

Like I said above, I don't expect to change anyone's opinion, but just to provide the doctor's point of view.
 

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Uncballzer, the potentially suiciadal patient is one thing, but then, even in that case what will you do if he says yes? You can't take it from him. But just in the social history, I don't believe that is a reasonable question. I certainly don't ask my patients, unless it's to compare notes.
 

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With regard to suicide, I have to ask what other items do physicians inquire about:

Sleeping pills
Razor blades
Knives
Rope, extension cords, belts
Natural gas or propane ovens
Access to tall buildings
Access to bridges
Motor vehicle with a garage

I guess I'm just wondering why guns are singled out when there are so many popular methods of suicide.
 

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Uncballzer, the potentially suiciadal patient is one thing, but then, even in that case what will you do if he says yes? You can't take it from him. But just in the social history, I don't believe that is a reasonable question. I certainly don't ask my patients, unless it's to compare notes.
No, can't take it from him; but definitely document using my example from before, document that you are aware of this, that you spoke to the patient about this--ie suicidal thoughts may occur with anti-depressants and especially that you recommend not having the guns in the house until stable and so forth. One way my preceptors have been teaching me have been like I'm on the stand:

Lawyer: Doctor, did you ask if the patient had guns in the house?
Doctor: No.
Jury: we award to the wife $$$$$$

or
Doctor: yes
Lawyer: and did you tell him the possibility of suicidal thoughts from the anti-depressant or even ask the patient about suicidal/homicidal thoughts or ideations, or that if he has a plan or intent?
Doctor: no
Judge: you just got screwed, doc.

or
Doctor answers yes to both of the above, and gave recommendation and alternatives to protect both the patient and himself.
Like I said, legal medicine. But also, if I believe he is a danger to himself/herself, or others, that's where the "duty to warn" comes into play and I notify either authorities or the person whom I feel will be in danger. In this case, I'm not exactly sure who I'd notify or speak with--possibly the spouse/family member if there is one, and recommend removing the weapons from the house or etc (oh, and definitely a psychiatric referral will be in order) (this is probably also where in the board question, you'd want to consult the "ethics committee").
 

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My annual hearing tests at work used to have these sort of questions on the paperwork. They don't anymore. They also quite asking for social security numbers to be entered. I always answered no to the firearms specific questions previously. "Do you shoot guns?" "Do you wear hearing protection when you shoot guns?" "I have shot a gun in the past week, month, ...........days." Were the typical questions I've run across. Physician questionnaires? I avoid physicians just like I do answering those types of questions.
 

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As I said in the other "Doctors & Guns" thread; I have to assume that my medical records will soon be in the hands of the New Bolsheviks that have control of the government.

For this reason I WILL lie and evade any question on a medical questionnaire that I do not see the immediate relevance to my current medical situation or long term health. Do I drink? I am now a tea totaler. Do I smoke? I have never touched tobacco. Do I own guns? I am a member of the Brady Bunch.
 

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This seems like a moot point for me,I was required to get a physical to get my CCW.The form for the doc to fill out was included in the sheriffs application package.
 

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uncballzer, I can see your point about asking someone that may be on anti-depressants but what good reason is there to ask a kid's parents except to spew the "guns in the house with kid's are dangerous" line?
Smoking, drinking, eating habits, sure, it's relevent. What possesions I own is not.
 

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Y'all will not be surprised to know that in the PALS (Pediatric Advanced Life Support) textbook that is affiliated with the AAP, there are references to 'facts' from anti gun organizations that lead the author to the 'proper' conclusion that guns are bad bad bad and should not be in the home of any child.
 
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