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If the motor is not a sustained burn I think I would let it free fall to terminal velocity and then kick the motor in for the terminal phase so we don't lose energy to drag in a sustained glide to the target.
But that's just me.
 

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How "secret" can a weapon be that is in the Wall St. Journal? I'm sure the terrorists will not find out about it there!
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Interesting.

During World War II if there was a ball bearing factory in a German town producing parts for a German tank or aircraft factory the Allies carpet bombed that town. Nearby residential areas housing skilled workers and engineers were considered legitimate target.

Neither Hiroshima nor Nagasaki were high priority military targets. They were selected as a demonstration of the futility of further resistance, and the historical record clearly shows that these bombings resulted in the capitulation of Japan, thus saving the Allied forces from the need for invasion against a hostile populace. Proof, you ask? The US government planned for the invasion of the Japanese home islands, making estimates of the casualties to be expected, and placed an order for 400,000 Purple Heart medals, and those Purple Heart medals are still being issued today, thanks to the fact that we didn't have to invade.

War is ugly. War is to be avoided whenever possible. But when war becomes inevitable it must be conducted ruthlessly and ended as swiftly as possible, which limits casualties in the long run.
My father flew those missions. You have to remember they didn't have "smart" bombs like we do today. The technology of the day (Norden bombsight and "dumb" bombs) and German defenses (flak, fighters, and smoke pots) made the need for great skill in delivering the usual 4-5 thousand pound bomb load. That load was normally 8-10 500 pound iron bombs. That bomb load was released in a matter of seconds, so "carpet bombing" is somewhat of a misnomer. According to the Squadron history, dad only participated in one true "carpet bombing" mission out of the 33 missions he flew, that being a mission to destroy entrenched German troops in northern Italy.

The British perfected the technique of "carpet bombing" at places such as Dresden using small incendiary bombs, a technique we picked up for B-29 raids on vulnerable Japanese cities. The B-29 fire raids caused a great many more causalities than the atomic bombs. 100,000 dead and estimates of as many as 400,000 injured - in ONE NIGHT. Here is a little information on the deadliest bombing mission in history:

https://www.airspacemag.com/daily-planet/deadliest-air-raid-history-180954512/

And here is a little bit about the B-17 in WWII.

https://www.britannica.com/technology/B-17

@mcp1810 Post #22 ---> BINGO exactly how you do it. That comes at the expense of standoff range, but that is why you carry the weapon on a very quiet running Reaper at 12-15 thousand feet.
 
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