Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 63 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I think this has been covered before here but I couldn’t find the post in the search bar, anyway when you field strip and clean your carry firearm do you simply load it and put it back in the holster right after cleaning or do you fire a few rounds through it then holster it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,958 Posts
I think this has been covered before here but I couldn’t find the post in the search bar, anyway when you field strip and clean your carry firearm do you simply load it and put it back in the holster right after cleaning or do you fire a few rounds through it then holster it?
No. Should not be anything removed for a "field strip" that could go back together wrong if that was the reason for your question? A full detail dismantle might be another story though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,433 Posts
AndyC, some people follow that procedure with hunting rifles. But I am with AzQkr, I've never done that with any hunting or self-defense rifle, or pistol.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,378 Posts
Guns that you plan to go to war with should be kept in good condtion. There are carry guns that can be neglected for 1000's of rounds and still work no problem. I would not want to be the test case. But I would have no problem trusting my life to some of the guns I carry if they have been 500 rounds and not cleaned. However, even if they haven't been shot if I've carried them for a few weeks I will will clean them as soon as I can remember to. Cleaning is also about inspecting when I clean I look for drifted sights, I look for rust, I look for anything out of the ordinary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I carry as clean a pistol as possible. Call it paranoia, OCD, or irrational, even with my duty pistol, I insist on carrying a clean pistol. The irrational reasoning, because I don't want to be carrying a dirty pistol, in the event it's questioned if I have erroneously discharged my weapon.
Hypothetical:
I am off duty, there is a "report of shots fired", and my vehicle "matches the description" of a vehicle seen leaving the scene, or maybe I was seen leaving the area, by coincidence.
Could be a situation where by inspection of my pistol, that it has, obviously, not been recently fired, or even if taken into evidence, forensics wise, it could not have been the weapon fired.
On the other hand, carrying a "fouled" barrel, it's not immediately evident, that my pistol wasn't the one that just discharged.
Sure, won't guarantee I wouldn't be further detained, and or arrested for further investigation, but I like having a clean pistol, literally, on my side to support my claim I didn't just discharge my pistol, should it ever be a question, which I'm sure it'll likely never be an issue.
I understand fouling for consistency in target shooting for long range rifle groups, but for "combat accurate" shot placement at self defense ranges, with a pistol, I don't see the value of it. Just like the argument over a DA pull on a DA/SA pistol, the "miss" , if you're training regularly and effectively, will still be on the threat, and we're not trying to shoot a "one hole" group. Preferably, you would want your self defense group, to have a spread to it, to affect more organs, more blood vessels, to achieve a stop of a threat. The more holes, the better, til whatever threat you're facing, has been stopped. One shot, one hole, likely, won't achieve that.
I would rather have physical, forensic, evidence, I didn't shoot, if hadn't, than the insignificant amount of consistency to bore diameter, and internal ballistics, that fouling would produce.


Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,856 Posts
Do you clean your gun at the range? I do a function check on my guns after disassembly, but never felt the need to shoot them unless I’m replacing parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,715 Posts
Mine are cleaned at home, so test firing in my neighborhood would cause the local PD to visit.
Better put on a pot of coffee.

Fire , clean, holster.
Sometimes it’s clean after extended carry without firing and reholster.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
237 Posts
Nope, never fouled a barrel after cleaning, there is no need in it. For SD situations, usually at very close distances, accuracy will not be that far off. Now if you are doing some very precision target shooting, then a few fouling rounds would be in order. On my .22 I use for squirrels, I may pop a round off to confirm zero, cause some .22 ammo act differently on a fresh cleaned barrel. I mostly shoot CCI Quiets and they tend to have about a 1 inch POI shift on a clean barrel. May not be the ammo, could be the barrel, so I do a few fouling rounds to get the POI back. Both my semi-auto pistols have never had a POI change on a clean barrel, nor has my AR, if it has, it was very minimal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,489 Posts
For a regular semi-auto pistol there isn’t much that needs to be taken apart to do a regular cleaning. Most just have a barrel, side, frame, and spring. Yank it apart, wipe it out, lube, put back together. As for a revolver, nothing needs to come apart. Clean the cylinders and barrel, forcing cone, under the star, breech face, small amount of lube, and you’re done.

Even when I have done a full strip on something like a Glock or any of my rifles, I trust it works once it’s back together. Simple machines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Yes, I function test my Off Duty carry pistol, after a field strip, which I do weekly, even I do not fire it. Of course, this assumes the firing pin is in tact and is capable of hitting a primer. What I do, is take dummy rounds (orange), and color the face with a dry erase marker (blue or black work best). I cycle the marked dummy rounds through, first one, I decock and press the trigger double action, hold the trigger to the rear, cycle the action, reset, and press the trigger single action. I make safe, and inspect the dummy rounds I ejected, to ensure the firing pin struck the back of them. The firing pin will leave a bright orange indentation and spot to contrast against the dark color I marked them with. No need to send anything down range and dirty up my pistol.
As for my duty pistol, I guess I rely on my Armory Officer, who is awesome! Our Glocks run great, and he cleans them right after we qualify with them, so unless something happens from the time I finish qualification, to the time he reassembles after I just fired it, the gun is good to go.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,279 Posts
After cleaning, I do a function check with a dry fire. If it's not my carry piece, it gets a snap cap in the chamber.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,357 Posts
I'll be a little contrary here.

I used to clean my firearms after every trip to the range. Now...not so much. If I'm going to carry a pistol, I make sure it works either by firing a few rounds or by performing a function check. If I don't get the chance to fire the pistol, I'll function check it, to include snapping the firing pin against a pencil eraser to make sure the pin will be hitting the primer with force.

If I've fired a few rounds as my function check, I'll run a bore snake through the barrel, wipe out the chamber, and wipe the pistol down. Make sure it's lubed appropriately.

I do like the smell of Hoppes #9 and a clean pistol, but I really like to know that the firearm is going to work if I need it. A little fouling won't hurt a good firearm.
 
1 - 20 of 63 Posts
Top