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I'll be a little contrary here.

I used to clean my firearms after every trip to the range. Now...not so much. If I'm going to carry a pistol, I make sure it works either by firing a few rounds or by performing a function check. If I don't get the chance to fire the pistol, I'll function check it, to include snapping the firing pin against a pencil eraser to make sure the pin will be hitting the primer with force.

If I've fired a few rounds as my function check, I'll run a bore snake through the barrel, wipe out the chamber, and wipe the pistol down. Make sure it's lubed appropriately.

I do like the smell of Hoppes #9 and a clean pistol, but I really like to know that the firearm is going to work if I need it. A little fouling won't hurt a good firearm.
I agree. After 300 plus rounds thru my gun this weekend, I brushed off the bolt face, snaked the bore twice, and sipped off the feed ramp, then straight to carry mode.

If you need to field strip a gun after a little shooting to make sure it will operate properly, ya need a better gun.
 

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Seems kind of OCD. Like washing your hands after you dry them because there might have been germs on the towel.

Clean your gun after you shoot it.

Bathe every Saturday.

Like we did in the Navy, never wash your coffee cup. That brown crust makes it taste better.
 

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I clean my guns after every shooting because that's what I was taught to do, not that it actually needs it. I just don't like a dirty gun. A simple functional check after cleaning works for me. As for the concept of fouling a cleaned barrel, I've never missed a deer, caribou, or moose because the barrel was too clean. I'm not fond of cleaning guns, don't care for the smell of Hoppes, but I get the grime out and call it a day.
 

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Do a function check after reassembly.
 
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I clean em after I get back from the range everytime, 100% of the time.

I normally only take whatever gun I'm carrying at the time, so it's just the one gun I have to clean. Takes only 5 or so minutes, no problemo.

Being as it's usually a revolver, I'm about 99.3% sure it's gonna go bang if it's called into action.
 

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I think the OP's question has more to do with ensuring that the gun works than any perceived need to "foul the barrel".

And no I don't because it's simply not feasible for me.
Guns are simple machines. If it goes "click" after pulling the trigger after cleaning, it's good to go.
 
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I clean them most the time after a range trip. I work the slide I pull the trigger call it good. I don't dirty the gun until the next time I go shooting. I figure we all do things our own way and that way is correct.
 

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I carry for defensive purposes, and I shoot competitively.

Among the serious game shooters, the guns are rarely broken down unless they show signs of so much crud built up it impedes function. By the time you have your favorite load nailed down you're pretty sensitive to how the gun runs and should know "cleaning time" is approaching. But none of the serious shooters I know will show up at an important match with a gun that's been cleaned but not fired since cleaning. Call it OCD, anal retentive or just detail-oriented, the opportunities for introducing problems expand exponentially after a teardown/reassembly cycle.

I'm not quite that intense, but ahead of a major match (like our Area 2 match coming up in 2 weeks) I'll give my gun a thorough cleaning, short of a total detain strip, and find a way to put 50+ rounds through the gun before game day.

The defensive guns are kept cleaner, primarily because I don't want extra oil weeping onto street clothes (did I mention the game guns are run "wet"?). They'll get wiped down (revos) or field stripped (autos) and have feed ramps cleaned, bores wiped if needed, and frame/slide rails re-lubed.

Having "survived" 3 Pat Rogers training courses I'm far less fastidious about gun cleanliness than I used to be. Credit also is due to current firearms design which allow for less-than-white-glove cleanliness in order for guns to run well.
 

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Honestly, I seldom strip my guns down, maybe a couple of times a year. But, when I do, I clean, lube, reassemble, load and place in holster.
 

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I clean after the range and either put it in service or put it in the safe.
My next range session could be a month or more depending on my work schedule. I’ll usually shoot my current carry gun and second gun but sometimes I’ll take 4 of my pistols. Whatever I take I’ll field strip and lube before going to the range. Haven’t had any failures.


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My ideal scenario would be a detail clean and lube followed-up by range test in +1 loading configuration and successful reload with carry magazines and carry ammo. Then we are good to go.
 
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Clean, reassemble, load, holster. No test fire required or desired.
 

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If I am target shooting or hunting at longer ranges, I take a fowling shot after cleaning.
 
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I've never fouled the barrel on a pistol or rifle after cleaning it in 50 years of shooting.
Agreed, during the ten years I was in the Corps we cleaned our weapons as soon as possible/practical after firing. The we let them be until we had a reason to fire them. Assuming you do not mess up reassembly after cleaning the gun it will work as well at it did before you cleaned it. A well maintained gun is a reliable gun/
 
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I just finished breaking down a S&W 686 into all it's bits and pieces. It got a deep cleaning. Even the firing pin spring got a gentle wipe down.

I'm 99% sure that I put it back together the correct way and didn't end up with any spare parts, a good sign.

A function check confirms that the revolver is working well. Very well. And, in single action, it passes my pencil firing test. (Launched a no.2 pencil a good 3 feet vertically into the air.)

Revolvers are simple, there is absolutely nothing wrong with this revolver now. I'm 99.99% sure of that.

I'm also 100% sure that I won't carry it until I've put 14 rounds through it. :wink:
 

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If I am target shooting or hunting at longer ranges, I take a fowling shot after cleaning.
Police counter sniper week long course. We cleaned the rifles after every 5-10 rounds or so.. No fouling shots were necessary to keep a newly cleaned barrel well within the 1 MOA
 

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Not really doable for me. Fire. Clean. Function test. Carry.


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I agree. After 300 plus rounds thru my gun this weekend, I brushed off the bolt face, snaked the bore twice, and sipped off the feed ramp, then straight to carry mode.

If you need to field strip a gun after a little shooting to make sure it will operate properly, ya need a better gun.
Yup.....like I say in my signature..... :image035:
 
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No. As long as I put it back together correctly and the hammer drops when I tell it to, I am good.

If you are concerned about that last part, put a pencil in the barrel and drop the hammer before loading it. If the gun functions correctly, the firing pin will shoot it out.
 
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