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I clean my carry weapon after shooting for the same reason @aikironin21 does, I want it clean in case there's ever a question about my weapon having been fired. Other than the carry pistols, they get cleaned from time to time, it's generally not humid here so few issues with rust.
 

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No. As long as I put it back together correctly and the hammer drops when I tell it to, I am good.

If you are concerned about that last part, put a pencil in the barrel and drop the hammer before loading it. If the gun functions correctly, the firing pin will shoot it out.
Yep. My garage ceiling is full of pencils from functional checking my guns.

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Clean, light lubrication, function check, light oil on outside, put away. I do not fire a clean firearm just to put it away.
 

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I typically let my newly cleaned firearms "dry" for a day or two before I reload them. I don't bathe my guns in Hoppes and RemOil, but knowing that those types of chemicals are about the worst thing for primers I'd rather err on the side of caution and let the chemicals dry up. So I just carry a different gun until everything has been given time to "dry".
 

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No, if I shot it I'd have to clean it again.
 
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Fire...unload...field strip...clean...reassemble...function check...load...holster. No post-clean firing required.
 
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If you need to field strip a gun after a little shooting to make sure it will operate properly, ya need a better gun.
I didn't hear anyone say they needed to clean it after firing. I heard them say they cleaned it after firing.

Ever hear of "plausible deniability?" What about a "legal defense?"

The best defense against a false charge of having fired your weapon is having an old, dried film of Hoppes on it along with a not-so-recent layer of gun oil.

Then again, the likelihood of that is about zilch.

I just prefer not to allow powder residue do whatever powder residue does to steel.

I clean it.
 

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I didn't hear anyone say they needed to clean it after firing. I heard them say they cleaned it after firing.

Ever hear of "plausible deniability?" What about a "legal defense?"

The best defense against a false charge of having fired your weapon is having an old, dried film of Hoppes on it along with a not-so-recent layer of gun oil.

Then again, the likelihood of that is about zilch.

I just prefer not to allow powder residue do whatever powder residue does to steel.

I clean it.
So...what point are you trying to make?
 
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I had my SP101 apart and in pieces today. Man, there are a lot of little pieces and springs in a SP101.

And there is a decent amount of fouling that gets in some of those little, hidden areas. Especially in the extractor rod and it's associated bits of housing. I haven't had this particular revolver apart for about three years. But it is nice and clean now.

I'm curious how you guys who are in the "clean after every shooting session" camp clean your revolvers. Do you tear them apart completely? If not.....well....did I mention the internals were kinda dirty?

Again, I won't be carrying this SP101 until it gets some range time and I know that it works, especially with magnum loads. Yes, it pops a pencil out of the barrel during dry fire, and the cylinder locks up just fine, the time seems right. But, until I know, I don't know. I should be from Missouri......


Edit: I will say that after every (95%) shooting session at the range, I do run a swab through the barrel and visually check the chambers and extractor for excessive fouling. I'm a little paranoid about excessive fouling under the extractor in a revolver--a potential source of reliability issues. However, none of that requires disassembly of the revolver what so ever.
 

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Oh brother..
" I never foul my gun barrel after cleaning it"
As if one test shot is going to foul the gun... c,mon lets use just a bit of common sense...
If a gun owner feels better testing a gun after cleaning and runs a round or two through it, take my word for it, its STILL a clean gun.. Takes more than a shot or two to "foul" it wouldn't ya think???
 

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I had my SP101 apart and in pieces today. Man, there are a lot of little pieces and springs in a SP101.

And there is a decent amount of fouling that gets in some of those little, hidden areas. Especially in the extractor rod and it's associated bits of housing. I haven't had this particular revolver apart for about three years. But it is nice and clean now.

I'm curious how you guys who are in the "clean after every shooting session" camp clean your revolvers. Do you tear them apart completely? If not.....well....did I mention the internals were kinda dirty?

Again, I won't be carrying this SP101 until it gets some range time and I know that it works, especially with magnum loads. Yes, it pops a pencil out of the barrel during dry fire, and the cylinder locks up just fine, the time seems right. But, until I know, I don't know. I should be from Missouri......


Edit: I will say that after every (95%) shooting session at the range, I do run a swab through the barrel and visually check the chambers and extractor for excessive fouling. I'm a little paranoid about excessive fouling under the extractor in a revolver--a potential source of reliability issues. However, none of that requires disassembly of the revolver what so ever.


I only do a complete disassemble once a year on my revolvers. The Smiths and their side plates are definitely easier, imo. Rugers are kind of a pia.

I like to use non chlorinated brake cleaner to clean em up real good and fast.
 

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I change out my underwear for clean every day, well, mostly. Does that count?

I have some teeny tiny black pit marks and scratches on the receiver of my Weatherby Orion. Lord have mercy!
 

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No, I field strip, clean, quick function test, put back in service or into the safe. The only fouling shot I have ever found necessary was on a Ruger 10-22 target build, and then for just a couple brands of ammo. The first shot with them after cleaning would always be substantially off, but after usually only one fouling shot or two for good measure it is grouping again.
 

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Fouling the barrel is an accuracy/consistency tip. It is essential for precision shooting, like match shooting. It is fine for the piece of mind before rifle hunting season.

Defensive guns don't get that level of accuracy. Some carry guns get carried without being shot or cleaned for a much longer time than a target match or a hunting season. For these reasons, carrying a clean and properly lubricated defensive gun is the way to go.

...but...I've intentionally shot a couple magazines through each pistol I might carry and let the gun sit a week. Then fired it dirty, after cooling and absorbing moisture. I started this habit after I found a certain pistol didn't like to cycle after sitting dirty for a day or two. It ran hundreds of rounds in a range day, but shoot 50 and let it sit? FTF until it warmed up. That gun is gone.
 

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Fouling the barrel is an accuracy/consistency tip. It is essential for precision shooting, like match shooting. It is fine for the piece of mind before rifle hunting season.

Defensive guns don't get that level of accuracy. Some carry guns get carried without being shot or cleaned for a much longer time than a target match or a hunting season. For these reasons, carrying a clean and properly lubricated defensive gun is the way to go.

...but...I've intentionally shot a couple magazines through each pistol I might carry and let the gun sit a week. Then fired it dirty, after cooling and absorbing moisture. I started this habit after I found a certain pistol didn't like to cycle after sitting dirty for a day or two. It ran hundreds of rounds in a range day, but shoot 50 and let it sit? FTF until it warmed up. That gun is gone.
That’s odd.....mind telling what gun it was?
 

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another member that cleans carry arms after use, and never carrys a dirty handgun, but its not really about some Martha Stewart drive for pristine gunmetal, its all about deniability, and proof of no-use, in the real world, having said that, I carefully maintain a copper-fouling in the lands/grooves of a magnum rifle...
 

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