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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Just found this...

SIDERLOCK | The Additional Safety for Glock pistols

Anyone have one for their Glock?

I've read tons of arguments against something like this. Everything from 'my safety is between my ears' to 'learn to better control your trigger finger' to 'if you want a manual safety buy a firearm that has one factory installed".

Also,

While I respect most replies, some are hogwash.

#1) Your safety is between your ears, but can what is between your ears control someone elses fingers? Can it control when your firearm is dropped and something very unlikely to happen happens? I'm guessing no...

#2) Your trigger finger might be 100% under your control, but you don't have control of other people fingers... like your 14 year old nephew that found your gun, the one you NEVER let out in the open, at a famliy get-together and decides he wants to pick it up.

#3) Why are only factory engineers capable of designing reliable parts? I am an engineer in the aftermarket field (not firearm related) and I'll put any of my designs up against the OE and I will win. I'm sure there are 'quacks' out there, but there are a lot of aftermarket items for firearms that improve the firearm's function / safety / reliability.

I love my Glock... I bought it because I do not think there is a more reliable gun out there for the money. I know I won't accidently discharge my firearm, but I cannot control everything that may cause a discharge... so I'm looking for something that may help.

I do not carry my Glock chambered, and I don't want to hear the 'if you don't feel comfortable enough to carry it chambered you shouldn't be carrying at all' crap. I'd rather have the slim risk of being shot before I can chamber a round than not having a firearm at all.

What works for me may not (probably not) work for you.. and that's perfectly fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Wanted to add... if Beretta would ever release their PX4 Sub-compact in .40 I might not have to have this argument any more;).
 

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I do not carry my Glock chambered, and I don't want to hear the 'if you don't feel comfortable enough to carry it chambered you shouldn't be carrying at all' crap. I'd rather have the slim risk of being shot before I can chamber a round than not having a firearm at all.
Then why do you need the trigger Lock?

If a kid can rack the slide he can figure out that he needs to press the little silver button.

It should be locked up when your not wearing it anyway.
 

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#2) Your trigger finger might be 100% under your control, but you don't have control of other people fingers... like your 14 year old nephew that found your gun, the one you NEVER let out in the open, at a famliy get-together and decides he wants to pick it up.
I can't let this one stand without commenting. Remove the magazine and empty the chamber, then take the ammunition with you. Don't rely on the manual safety to avert tragedy in the event that a child gains unauthorized access to a firearm.

But back to your question, you might want to check out the Saf-T-Block as well.
 

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Biggest issue is that this "safety" device is not ambidextrous. If you really want a manual safety, it must be ambidextrous IMO. If you have to fire with your support hand, you will not be able to remove this safety.

My home defense Glock 19 must be usable both by myself (right-handed) and my wife (a lefty). If we are out, and I become disabled, I want her to be able to easily use my carry G26.

No thanks. I'll pass.

As an aside, your firearms should be either on your body, or in a safe at home. Access by children or other unauthorized persons should thus be a non-issue. And yes, I have children in the home - my guns go from the holster to the safe, and vice versa. I close and lock the bedroom door while doing this, so as not to be disturbed or interrupted.

JMHO.:smile:
 

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Well, if you install the Siderlock, then your finger goes inside the trigger guard to activate and deactivate this item. Just something more for your controlled finger to understand. Your finger will be touching the trigger before you may intend to touch the rest of the trigger.
 

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Well, if you install the Siderlock, then your finger goes inside the trigger guard to activate and deactivate this item. Just something more for your controlled finger to understand. Your finger will be touching the trigger before you may intend to touch the rest of the trigger.
This.

Regardless of other concerns, a safety that requires you to press on the side of the trigger itself is a bad idea, IMO. What happens if you press too hard at an angle and your finger slips off and across the trigger face?
 

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Good luck accomplishing a controlled, fine-motor skill type of movement to work that device when the adrenaline is pumping 100%...
 

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Sounds like you should be carrying a revolver...
 

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Jr Freak, I guess you expected these comments. I tend to agree with you. The problem(?) with a Glock is if you unintentionally press the trigger, it's going to fire. And that's exactly what it designed to do. But not everyone is comfortable with that. I can't blame them. How many have their 1911s chambered, hammer back, safety off when carrying? Do they really trust that grip safety? Do I really trust the Glock trigger safety? Heck no. Anything mechanical can and will fail.

I have the same style push button on my shot guns and I've never accidently fired a round when pressing the safety, and a pheasent exploding in your face can certainly get the adreneline pumping.

There is also a thumb safety that can be installed on Glocks, if that style is more to your liking. It does require a small slot to be cut into the frame, but doesn't void the warranty. It's, obviously, highly reccomended that it be installed by a competent gunsmith. It runs about $125 installed.

1911s, etc. have external safeties that take extra time to release, why would one on a Glock be any more of a problem for the owner, who should have practiced with it?

There's a million ways to accomplish anything, find the one that you're comfortable with and go with it.
 

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I just took a quick look and the sliderlock is dangerous! A saftey device that you must operate by putting your trigger finger on the trigger and pressing sideways before you are ready to fire? Do they think that is a good idea?

It is far too easy to press the trigger reward while trying to disengage the button. Fumbling around with your index finger on the trigger is a very bad idea. How do you re-engage the safety? By using your weak hand or by sticking your finger into the trigger guard, around the front of the trigger, and then pressing it to the other position? An "accident" waiting to happen.

I am all for appropriate safety devices. This particular one seem dangerous to me. If any of these are sold, they will be recalled.
 

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I have the small plastic Glock safety that is inserted behind the trigger and can easily be pushed out on the draw. It's probably an unnecessary precaution but it can be removed without actually fingering the trigger and I can carry loaded and chambered. I really only worried about it when carrying in my SmartCarry. My IWB holster pretty much covers the trigger. I feel more comfortable with a wheel gun in my Smart Carry. As to safety with youngsters, there should be no compromise. Keep them locked in a gun safe and keep the key on you at all times. I have a good friend who will have to face his quadraplegic son for the rest of his life, who was shot and severed his spinal cord with a supposedly unloaded gun that was well hidden but unlocked.
 

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Just found this...

SIDERLOCK | The Additional Safety for Glock pistols

Anyone have one for their Glock?

I've read tons of arguments against something like this. Everything from 'my safety is between my ears' to 'learn to better control your trigger finger' to 'if you want a manual safety buy a firearm that has one factory installed".

Also,

While I respect most replies, some are hogwash.

#1) Your safety is between your ears, but can what is between your ears control someone elses fingers? Can it control when your firearm is dropped and something very unlikely to happen happens? I'm guessing no...

you dont control others fingers...you control access to your gun...thats your responsibility...curious minds will work every lever and button on a gun and if you think a child cant figure out how to turn a safety off and pull a trigger you are sadly mistaken and fooling yourself...glocks have a striker block mechanism that will not allow the striker to contact a chambered round unless the trigger is pulled...dropping the gun will not cause an accidental discharge...get your facts straight before you challenge others...

#2) Your trigger finger might be 100% under your control, but you don't have control of other people fingers... like your 14 year old nephew that found your gun, the one you NEVER let out in the open, at a famliy get-together and decides he wants to pick it up.

you already made this point in number one...so i wont repeat myself...


#3) Why are only factory engineers capable of designing reliable parts? I am an engineer in the aftermarket field (not firearm related) and I'll put any of my designs up against the OE and I will win. I'm sure there are 'quacks' out there, but there are a lot of aftermarket items for firearms that improve the firearm's function / safety / reliability.

original manufacturers parts generally work best with the equipment they are designed for and are usually more model specific...the manufacturer that produces a product generally spends more money and time testing their own components than aftermarket companies as they make components for many different manufacturers products...therefore...reliability, fit and function are usually...usually better with original manufacturers components...as an engineer yourself i'm sure youre pretty proud of what youre capable of and will disagree with this statement but i will stand fast with it....

I love my Glock... I bought it because I do not think there is a more reliable gun out there for the money. I know I won't accidently discharge my firearm, but I cannot control everything that may cause a discharge... so I'm looking for something that may help.

something mechanical probably isnt going to make a difference..if it did you wouldnt be hearing about guns with manual safeties having negligent and accidental discharges...it all comes down to the operator/owner and their commitment to safety...not the gun...

I do not carry my Glock chambered, and I don't want to hear the 'if you don't feel comfortable enough to carry it chambered you shouldn't be carrying at all' crap. I'd rather have the slim risk of being shot before I can chamber a round than not having a firearm at all.

that is the most interesting statement you have made...your choice but what in the world is going to cause an accidental discharge of a gun without a chambered round?...

What works for me may not (probably not) work for you.. and that's perfectly fine.
i am not interested in insulting you or downplaying your commitment to safety...i just dont believe you are approaching it correctly and you are spending more time trying to discredit others thoughts than understanding them...
 

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I see the cocked and locked 1911 is brought up and compared to Glock. Yes, the hammer is cocked on the 1911 and to not use the two active safeties is ridiculous. The difference with a chambered Glock is that the effect of actively pulling the trigger completes the cocking of the striker. Quite a difference. Now, if you wish to use one of these devices thats your decision. If feeling safe or making your gun less prone to discharging without your intent, I say go for it.

I usually carry a revolver because of the reliability it affords me. This reliability coupled with the fact it can be fired while in a pocket and is less prone to malfunctions makes me feel safe.
 

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Anybody remember the spate of LEO NDs into perps with Glocks before the NY trigger was born?
 

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I have one that I tried on my Glock 23. It worked as advertised but I don't carry the G23 anymore so I took it off. If you want to try it shoot me a PM and I'll throw it in an envelope and mail it to you and you can test it out.
 

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I too love and carry Glocks, and 1911 style pistols also. I carry at all times with a chambered round and that dictates my holster and style of carry no matter what brand of pistol I'm carrying.

If you think that you will have the time to chamber a round, plus the mindset to do so when you must shoot or die, I think you "may" be a bit mistaken about how much time you will have. And clarity of mind and motor skills necessary to accomplish this task at the worst 1.5 to 2.0 seconds in your life. I have trained on a live fire simulator (real bullets at real mansized targets that react to your every move/shot/etc and counter your move/shot/etc) drawing from concealment. This $100K computer system was a real eye opener and I found that I could pull from concealment and hit with the first shot in roughly 1.5 seconds with another .3 to .4 seconds to hit with two additional shots (mozambique drill). And even at that timing, the perps would shoot me before I got off my first shot on more than one occasion. By the time your mind registers the threat, you acknowledge the threat, you react to the threat, and you neutralize the threat, you are probably at least 2-3 seconds into the situation. Taking another .5 seconds to work your slide, if you can have clarity of mind to pull that off that quick, come back on target, and engage, may just be the .5 seconds that you "don't/won't" have available to you. So there is no such thing as a "slim chance" of you being shot while you take the time to chamber a round. More like a "great' chance but don't beleive me. Find a professional live fire simlulator and see how good you really are, or aren't.

My most important safety is between my ears, even if you don't think so. I too hate cliches but the bottom line is "you can't fix stupid" to take a quote off another Texan. I've never had an AD but have gotten close once when my finger "slipped" inside the triggerguard on my G36 when I was holstering it and not paying full attention. That was a "between the ears" problem if I've ever experienced one and I was fully awake and aware of the situation within milliseconds of the mistake. Feeling the side of my G36's trigger for even a millisecond scared the bejesus out of me. And as far as wandering fingers of children or others, I never let anyone feel my weapon at any time, nor is it available for them to feel at any time. Since I carry concealed, no one even knows I have it on me anyway.

I too am an engineer, registered in fact. Even with all the design drawings, calcs, etc in my hands, and I was a proficient firearms designer, I "might" be able to improve on another's design. But there is a far better than 50/50 chance that I don't know as much as the original designer nor am aware of or understand all the tradeoffs in the original design that make any product what it is. But sure, with enough training, time, and knowledge of a particular design an engineer may certainly be able to improve the design. Happens all the time. But as an engineer fully aware of my liability exposure, I would have to be one h*ll of knowledgeable firearms designer before I would ever try my hand at designing an aftermarket part for any mechanism that is capable of or has a primary purpose/function that is meant to take life or protect life. The poorhouse and/or prison is not a draw for me at this or any other time in my life. Isn't it great that we live in the USA where we can all "still" make personal choices on firearms and their use and carry. :hand10:
 

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I'm with the 'a safety that requires putting your finger inside the trigger guard isn't all that safe' camp.

I'm also a believer in a standard manual of arms when it comes to my pistols...they all either have a 'sweep down to fire' safety, or no safety at all, so no matter what I'm shooting, sweeping the safety (or where it would be if there were one) keeps it consistent across platforms.
 

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I know I will probably get flamed for this but it makes me feel safer.I am used to the 1911 pistols and when I got my first glock it worried the hell out of me so I had a cominilli(sp)safety installed.It works just like a 1911.If you are used to shooting this style it is just natural to push down with your thumb as you bring the pistol up to shooting position.I have it on a g26 and I like it a lot better.I can just drop it in my back pocket and not worry about tripping the trigger.So flame on all you glock as is lovers.I also have a g19 as my house gun in stock form and love it too.sj
 

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Anybody remember the spate of LEO NDs into perps with Glocks before the NY trigger was born?
Not entirely sure which side of the argument about this device you're on, but I don't think this (or any other safety) would have made a difference. If an officer has their gun pointed at a subject and has gone as far as putting their finger on the trigger, I'm pretty sure this safety would have been disengaged by that point.

Even if it's just really bad trigger discipline, I still feel a more traditional thumb safety is a better answer than one mounted on the trigger, and more training, of course.
 
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