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I am often glad no one is watching - because I practice draw at all sorts of times!! Walking to and fro, house - office, office - house - and more recently sitting here at puter. Almost any time in fact. :rolleyes:

I am aware despite practice that (for me) a sitting draw is perceptably slower. Not by much but the whole manouver is less slick. When I stand and draw there is a fluid motion, hard to reproduce from sitting.

I am working on it but somehow doubt it will ever achieve standing draw ability.
 

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But that you are AWARE and practice counts huge. Kudos
 

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a draw may be needed at any time, in any position. I practice from a drop and crawl to sitting, crouched, prone all sorts of diffrent positions.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Way to go Rocky - easy to forget some of those but the sitting one has been bugging me!!

You have the age advantage too - my old bod' is less than willing sometimes! :wink:
 

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Just don't shoot the 'puter, unless it does something to annoy you, of course!:comeandgetsome:
 

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Im new to the CHP/CCW arena and am wondering what kind of practicing I should be doing. Where can I learn some good draws and what should I be practicing? I just thought this would be a good questions since the sitting question was raised. :gah:
 

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P95Carry said:
Way to go Rocky - easy to forget some of those but the sitting one has been bugging me!!

You have the age advantage too - my old bod' is less than willing sometimes! :wink:
And don't forget, the older you get the further you have to reach! :stups:
 

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cougartxn said:
Im new to the CHP/CCW arena and am wondering what kind of practicing I should be doing. Where can I learn some good draws and what should I be practicing? I just thought this would be a good questions since the sitting question was raised. :gah:
Practice slow perfect draws from atleast the standing, kneeling, prone, sitting and with your back turned to target. One of the biggest helps in shooting is the dry fire. If you will dry fire about 50 reps from the holster a day, you will find you draw time going down and your accuracy getting better.

But the key is slow perfect reps, good grip, clean smooth draw, hands joining, presentation, commited trigger, front sight, press, and then recovery. Two important things ....ONE make sure the weapon is UNLOADED... I use weighted mags and snap cap in chamber and TWO folks on the TV are wonderful targets, they move, breath and have life like eyes.

Ok I'll hush and go back to my box.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I agree with your method there Steve - and have done it but because most of time the draw is with loaded carrypiece, the practice is usually pretty much getting out and grip etc. The aquisition phase.

I think I will set up the 228 with a weighted mag and snap cap - and substitute that so as to include the dry fire element. I hate frequent load/unload on carry 226 - mostly because of the trauma to ammo.

Practice is only way tho, always. Thx.

Oh and Cougar - welcome :smilez: - follow Steve (fed's) advice - it will help you.
 

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cougartxn ~ In Home Practice

Newbie Draw Practice.

Naturally, check ~ double check your firearm to make sure that it is empty.
Use dummies if you want to match the exact weight.
SLOW is the way to go at first.

VERY SLOW
You need to ingrain that pattern of movement.
Turn off the TV ~ Do not listen to "tunes" while you are trying to pattern your draw sequence.

One thing that really helps:
Close your eyes & do a series of 10 slow and complete draw & presentations every day for a week. You should do that In Addition To your normal practice.
That WILL help your mind to "Brainset" the movement & it helps with fluidity. It really works!
I am "sold" on rehearsing the exact draw sequence in a slightly meditative state of mind.

If you carry covered by a shirt then replace the shirt to its PRE~Draw location for every practice draw.

If your holster has a retention strap RE-SNAP IT prior to every new practice draw.

I hope the above information helps.
 

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All good advise.

If I may, add a bit of "hmmmm" within the thread (or have it branched off if considered a hi-jack).

QK mentioned the "brainset" (or also known as muscle memory). Now, it seems, from reading the boards for over many years, that people carry different depending on season, attire, etc.. So, one in winter may carry IWB/OWB because they have on a coat/sweater but when summer comes around, change to pocket/shorts or use a smaller gun in their OWB/IWB setup.

Now, you have to obtain muscle memory for both types of carry / different types of firearms (reach, draw, grasping the grip, etc..). BUT, in the time of need, which "brainset" will be the one that it goes to? Could this cause a problem or is it maybe a non-issue? And if it is an issue, what would be the best solution?

Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wayne - your point raised is why I standardize my carry as close to 100% as possible. The ''muscle memory'' of the essential draw and fire will probably hold good but IMO never quite as well as with the same gun, same rig, and same position every time.

I have ''OWB'd'' now so long I hesitate to use my sho rig again as I fear my hand will dive to right hip before I remember, even allowing for the feel of where gun weight is!!

QK - emphasis on the SLOW - yes indeed - build by increments. The closed eyes too is another good ploy - I open eyes at end of draw to see where gun is pointing and how sights look etc. All good stuff.
 

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Closing your eyes while drawing is great training - helps to ingrain point of aim into muscle memory. It can also be beneficial in selecting a carry piece. Some handguns just flat-out point better than others, and it varies by individual. For some guys it's Glocks, for others 1911s or S&W wheelguns. When shopping, try a bunch and find the one that points naturally for you, not just what the salesman is pushing or the flavor of the day.
 

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Some handguns just flat-out point better than others
Mine is my Luger. But it's heck to conceal lol.

Chris. That is what I've been thinking of doing, but sometimes it doesn't seem feasable to always do so. But I've started to learn to dress around the gun, not just going and buying inexpensive clothes that fit but not so great for concealed carry.

Wayne
 

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Discussion Starter #15
dress around the gun
For anyone who can indulge this luxury - it is the way to go IMO - and also pretty much allows use of full size.
 

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Good points already made.

Consider:

Driving, and this "drawing from sitting". Now some right handed folks have found crossdraw not only more comfortable, also affords 1) easier to draw if being carjacked and 2) if approached from passenger side, CCW "may" not be thought of - instead driver messing with seat belt, door locks, window...

Other folks that sit a lot, including wheelchair bound folks find this to work better for them.

Just tossing this out...

Steve
 

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When in the office my primary method of carry is pocket carry. I recently got a belt clip holster to use in the car. In the car the gun comes out of the pocket and into the belt clip in a cross-draw position. There is no way that sitting down in my bucket seats with seat belt on that I would be able to get at my pocket carry piece. When stopped at red lights it is easy to cover the grip with my hand and at condition yellow no perceived threat will get near the car without me being able to draw quickly.
 

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QKShooter said, "I am "sold" on rehearsing the exact draw sequence in a slightly meditative state of mind."

This brings to mind how I learned the art of fly-fishing, specifically, the cast. With no one around to teach me, I started watching videos of the "masters." (Minor correction, there was one lesson from a local legend, in the parking lot of the store I bought my first fly rod.)

As I am prone to do, I watched these videos while in a "meditative" state, probably an Alpha state of consciousness. I cannot advise on how to go about that, but I can suggest a good book on the subject, Concentration and Meditation - A Manual of Mind Development, by Christmas Humphreys. I'm sure there are others, as well.

The short version of this is that it didn't take very long at all for me to learn to cast at a level quite beyond what most beginners achieve in such a short time.

This training method sounds very much like what Bryan S. Williams describes in his book, Welcome to the Real World, A Dangerous Place to be Caught Unprepared! He calls it "Neuro Linguistic Programing." Although he doesn't go too much into the subject, he does discribe this method, NLP, and tells us that it does indeed have a history and is effective as a learning tool in the field of firearms training.

Once in a while, what sounds like a Spooky, Left-Coast, Shirley McClain-oriented fad, will actually turn out to be a very real thing, with a good grounding in actual science.

Works for me, anyway.

mm
 

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Once in a while, what sounds like a Spooky, Left-Coast, Shirley McClain-oriented fad, will actually turn out to be a very real thing, with a good grounding in actual science.
Ya know, I agree with mm.
In learning anything, a slow accurate repetition will build a muscle memory that can then be built up for speed. That is how I teach my kids to play musical instruments, and with Chris’s advice, my own carry and draw technique.
It doesn’t have to be spooky, but it is scientific.
 
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