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I'm not sure when I last released the slide with a slide stop.
My son swears the thing is simply a rest for his thumb. Whether the slide locks back and how it gets cycled, it has no part of the equation for him. I would correct him except he’s finishing his second mag before I’m done with my mag change (and, I’m actually pretty quick).
 

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When I am intentionally practicing a speed reload, sometimes I seat the magazine so hard, the slide releases on its own.

One and done.
My 10mm Glocks do this too which raises the question, is this a design feature or a problem?
 

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It never happens to me since I don't seat the magazine in too hard but it's common (if you seat it in hard and at a certain angle)...especially common with M&Ps and PPQs. Don't count on it happening every time though.

My 10mm Glocks do this too which raises the question, is this a design feature or a problem?
 

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My 10mm Glocks do this too which raises the question, is this a design feature or a problem?
My M&P would do that more often as the spring saw more rounds. Replaced the recoil spring and it worked correctly again. Replaced with a heavier spring and it felt like a whole new gun.
 

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My HK has a ambi slide release (Yes, HK calls it a slide release) and it sits too far back (designed to be within easy reach of shooting thumb)to use anything but your firing hand thumb conveniently. To use your support thumb would be awkward on that gun and take an extra repositioning.
Beretta Pico has no slide release and must be slingshot only.
Commander 1911 I also use as a slide release with my shooting hand thumb so as not to introduce a third system. It is also located for easy reach with shooting thumb.
 

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My 10mm Glocks do this too which raises the question, is this a design feature or a problem?
My M&P would do that more often as the spring saw more rounds. Replaced the recoil spring and it worked correctly again. Replaced with a heavier spring and it felt like a whole new gun.
We have three M&P9’s that will consistently do this, the manual calls it an auto forward feature. I trained my wife to perform reloads, and it consistently works for her, as well.

I consider it an M&P feature, not an “problem,” which is why I have no interest in the 2.0 models.

I’ve had a few 1911’s that would do the same when reloaded “briskly.”
 

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My 10mm Glocks do this too which raises the question, is this a design feature or a problem?
Well, it you wish to convert what I said into meaning using one hand only to insert the magazine and drop the slide, go for it. But you clearly understand the controls are designed to be used with the shooting hand only and not "require" a support hand, seeing as you would now be handling two separate items--gun and magazine.

You asked for comments. I think you're creating a solution for a hypothetical problem. There's more than one way to drop a slide, none are the only way and all are the correct way--sling shot, shooting hand on the release, support thumb, big toe if that's what works for you. I'd be more interested in knowing to cycle the slide on a no-fire than concern myself with any particular method of releasing the slide.
Excellent point, Sir.
 

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My 10mm Glocks do this too which raises the question, is this a design feature or a problem?
My Glock 30 has done that a time or two. I think it's just a case of the slide lock not fully engaged--for a variety of reasons--and a sharp seating of the mag shaking it loose.

Or not.
 

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99.9% of the time when a reload is required in competition , I'm skipping the slide lock lever and using a slingshot action on the slide.
 

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99.9% of the time when a reload is required in competition , I'm skipping the slide lock lever and using a slingshot action on the slide.
But, but, but...

I'm all for someone doing what works easiest and best for them, no matter what flaws someone else may feel that action or method may have. Consistency is important. I can't say what manner of dropping the slide I may use under any circumstance, thus why I use both the release and slingshoting. It's not rocket science, I'll get the job done, and if the slide happens to drop on an empty chamber, I'll just think "Oh crap" as I slingshot it again.
 
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Applegate taught me to forcefully double tap the magazine base when doing a speed reload to insure the magazine is properly seated.
This was in 1996.
Then and now I find that on my Glock 19 — and I have owned 2 others since then—this will cause the slide to go forward on it’s own about 95% of the time.
That’s the good news.
Bad news is that sometimes it will not pick up a round.
 

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A Glock? Say it ain't so!
 

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I have been using the slide stop with the support hand to release the slide since I was taught that way in the Army with a 1911. It is a faster more intuitive reload than the slingshot method. It works with Glocks, M&P's and 1911's, I don't care about the other platforms because I don't shoot them, though I know how to.
 

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My son swears the thing is simply a rest for his thumb. Whether the slide locks back and how it gets cycled, it has no part of the equation for him. I would correct him except he’s finishing his second mag before I’m done with my mag change (and, I’m actually pretty quick).
He would be even faster if he used the slide release.
 

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I can say from experience that an adrenaline dump will significantly inhibit fine motor skills. Every defensive handgun skill I’ve acquired over many decades requires only gross motor skills.
 

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I have been using the slide stop with the support hand to release the slide since I was taught that way in the Army with a 1911. It is a faster more intuitive reload than the slingshot method. It works with Glocks, M&P's and 1911's, I don't care about the other platforms because I don't shoot them, though I know how to.
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I can say from experience that an adrenaline dump will significantly inhibit fine motor skills. Every defensive handgun skill I’ve acquired over many decades requires only gross motor skills.
Reloads are not a fine motor skill, tightening screws on your glasses is.
 

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Reloads are not a fine motor skill, tightening screws on your glasses is.
You'd think it was watching people try to find that mag well with the top of the mag trying to get it inserted. :redface:
 
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