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Sorry for two new threads on the same day (a record for me) but this one is just too good to pass up.
I had no idea there was a limit!!!
 

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I had a guy I work with that was called by both Local Leo's and the FFA for shooting down a drone. It would hover over his pool every time his wife and daughters were out!
After contacting him a couple times, and him both admitting he shot it, and giving up the wreckage, they lost interest and quit calling him.
My guess is the Perv with a plane did not want to talk about what he was doing with it. DR
Even got the Future Farmers of America (FFA) involved? :smile:
 

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It would seem to me formation flying 30 drones would be quite a feat for non-military operators. I am aware the technology exists to do this, but how much money and logistics would be involved? Anyone should be able to defend their privacy from drones the same as any other form of "peeping".
 

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Its all legal guys. Its actually the University of Colorado Boulder using their drone swarm to test a new form of terrestrial mapping for agriculture.

Being a gun guy, and a guy who also builds and flys my own drones, I don't understand why people are so against drones. They do great things, provide aid where needed, accomplish tasks, and are even just a fun hobby in general (like shooting.) I would say that 99.9% of drone pilots don't care who or what they are looking at, they are just flying around to get the experience of flying, they don't do it to spy on people. Most drones barely have cameras over cell phone quality, so anything further than 50 feet away, you start to struggle to tell who or what it is with any sort of clarity. From 150 feet up, moving at 20 mph, and with the oscillations from the propellers, its nigh impossible to even tell that it is a person.

Also, now that since about 2017 the FAA has made it so that drone pilots have to register their drones with them, it makes all legally registered and operated drones aircrafts, and its a felony to shoot at, or shoot down an aircraft.

Now if the drone is like 25 feet over your property, and has been there for like 10 mins getting close ups of the inside of your house, thats a much different situation from a guy flying by at 100 feet up.
 

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@TheGurgeMan it's the second scenario we are discussing. The peeping toms, or the criminals, checking things out remotely. Well, peeping toms are a subset of criminals, or at least deviants. Keeping their perversions in check will only help keep them from escalating their behavior to far worse things.
 

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That is illegal too. Doing pretty much anything to a drone even over your property is off-limits, they're protected the same as any aircraft. Just shining a laser pointer at one could land you in the same trouble as shining one at a commercial jet liner.
Last week, I was in my driveway and heard a noise. I turned around and a drone was 15 feet behind me at eye level. I will admit a few thoughts crossed my mind. But, seeing as it was too low to peer into a window, I avoided fire and gave consideration to using a broom.

The neighbors were filming a movie and had the drone setup to follow the actor as he walked in and out of the house. Every time he went inside, the drone would approach me.

Anyway, how much would it cost to get a taxidermist to mount a drone? Just curious.
 

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@TheGurgeMan it's the second scenario we are discussing. The peeping toms, or the criminals, checking things out remotely. Well, peeping toms are a subset of criminals, or at least deviants. Keeping their perversions in check will only help keep them from escalating their behavior to far worse things.
Yeah Im just saying that it happens far, far, far, less than people think its happening. I used to train with a guy whos job it is to design radio transmission systems, and he actually uses drones in order to move the systems away from him, and then test the signal strength and clarity, etc. There would be people asking him why he was flying over their houses, etc, etc, why he was spying on him and everything. The drone had no cameras, its only job was to get a certain distance from the transmitter, broadcast a signal, and return home. Several people though that because the drone stopped above their house for a few seconds, that it was for ulterior motives, while infact it was just a random coincidence that it showed up there.

People nowadays are way too paranoid that someone is trying to get some insider info on them or some candid photos. I really wish that I thought random people cared that much for me, but I know they dont.
 

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Lots of farmers fly. Time to fire up the Cessna or crop dusters. I wonder what kind of turbulence a close pass might cause.
Brings to mind a cool story from my Navy days. A friend of mine was big on the history of flying aces and he got me interested in reading up on it. There was an Israeli pilot, Major (later General) Shlomo Egozi during the Arab-Israeli war, who became a flying ace in one pass, without firing a weapon. It is probably the only time it has ever happened in the history of air combat.

Egozi and his RIO, Roy Manof, were returning from a ground attack mission in their F-4E in Oct. of '73. They had no weapons left and were just trying to make it home. Egozi saw five Russian-made, Egyptian Mi-8 "Hip" helicopters in an echelon formation, flying down low near the ground. He put the F-4E into a supersonic dive, lined up on the echelon, got down low and flew supersonic right over their rotors. The shock wave crashed all five helicopters and was recorded as five air-to-air kills, making him an instant ace. FWIW, Egozi went on to get three more air-to-air kills the normal way.

Anyhow, many years later, I got to meet him. When I was at the Naval Safety Center in the '84-'85 timeframe, General Egozi was on a visit to the US and decided to visit the Safety Center and I got assigned to give him a tour. He was amazed when I asked, "General Egozi, weren't you the pilot who..." He said it was all true, but played it down. He was obviously a really humble guy. If you saw him on the street in plain clothes, you probably would guess he was an old Jewish accountant.
 

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Ok my 2 cents. I used to have a dji mavic air, when I heard these reports about drones in Colorado and Nebraska there were reports of them hovering for hours.

This doesnt pass the smell test as the flight time of even the best multi rotor drones is about 25 to 30 min flight time.

Now mind you they collect amazing quality video but this is about akin to a hobbyist flying an rc airplane.

With such a limited range and speed, this can't be anything mode than a couple hobbyist neighbors enjoying the day.

Do you get upset if someone flies a private airplane over your property? We don't worry about men in cesnas with Nikon's do we? I would fly my drone on regular basis to capture the scenery of where I was traveling that week for work. I had an altitude limit of 500 feet agl set by the faa. I guarantee I probably crossed someone's property line on accident. I probably caught someone on footage accidentally, but that's akin to riding my motorcycle with a go pro past sometimes property. Much ado about nothing in my opinion.

I think the whole drone paranoia held by the older crowd might be a little unrealistic.
 

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It's true that drones currently have limited flight time. Until improvements in battery technology, that will remain the case.

The issue here, is with the "behavior" of the drone, and not with all drones. Being situationally aware, we notice when something isn't right, and take steps to deal with the situation. One person here did shoot down a drone that was being used to spy on his family. Technology isn't bad, but how it gets used sure can be. It's when things are being done in a manner that isn't right that we need some recourse to deal with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
......People nowadays are way too paranoid that someone is trying to get some insider info on them or some candid photos. I really wish that I thought random people cared that much for me, but I know they dont.
I suspect that if criminals stopped casing places to commit violent crimes and the government and tech companies would stop spying on American citizens, we wouldn't be so disturbed by them. You think?

@glocknjeep You and I both know there are flyover restricted parts of the country where your little Cessna might get shot down at worst, or you could end up in Leavenworth. You do know about ADIZ regulations, right? I'm sorry if some pilots get a little hot about the issue. I cannot really figure a valid reason for a drone to be hovering 25 feet above my back yard when Mrs OldChap is out sunbathing or my great grand children are swimming. Having worked with a police department for almost 10 years, I know that police and prosecutors have a great deal of latitude in how they enforce the law when it comes to someone shooting down such intrusions.
 

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I had a long diatribe prepared to post but decided it just sounded like a rant. Instead, I offer the advice that drones are the 21st century version of “get off my lawn”. Except, they aren’t. The use of drones and sensors and their conflict with property rights and privacy rights is in its infancy. The laws punishing those who steal (sorry, disrupt) are very much lacking.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I think the future of drone use will show a great many more uses than we see right now. I know that SWAT folks are waiting with baited breath for the new generation of "micro drones" (ones that look like insects). I can see a lot of lives saved by those.

By the same token, I see almost all the problems are being caused by amateurs and people who care little for the laws and restrictions. I know that isn't fair, and realize there are a great number of recreational and non-professional users who never cause problems.
 

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Its all legal guys. Its actually the University of Colorado Boulder using their drone swarm to test a new form of terrestrial mapping for agriculture.

Being a gun guy, and a guy who also builds and flys my own drones, I don't understand why people are so against drones. They do great things, provide aid where needed, accomplish tasks, and are even just a fun hobby in general (like shooting.) I would say that 99.9% of drone pilots don't care who or what they are looking at, they are just flying around to get the experience of flying, they don't do it to spy on people. Most drones barely have cameras over cell phone quality, so anything further than 50 feet away, you start to struggle to tell who or what it is with any sort of clarity. From 150 feet up, moving at 20 mph, and with the oscillations from the propellers, its nigh impossible to even tell that it is a person.

Also, now that since about 2017 the FAA has made it so that drone pilots have to register their drones with them, it makes all legally registered and operated drones aircrafts, and its a felony to shoot at, or shoot down an aircraft.

Now if the drone is like 25 feet over your property, and has been there for like 10 mins getting close ups of the inside of your house, thats a much different situation from a guy flying by at 100 feet up.
We need more SAMs. :rolleyes:
 

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I suspect that if criminals stopped casing places to commit violent crimes and the government and tech companies would stop spying on American citizens, we wouldn't be so disturbed by them. You think?


@glocknjeep You and I both know there are flyover restricted parts of the country where your little Cessna might get shot down at worst, or you could end up in Leavenworth. You do know about ADIZ regulations, right? I'm sorry if some pilots get a little hot about the issue. I cannot really figure a valid reason for a drone to be hovering 25 feet above my back yard when Mrs OldChap is out sunbathing or my great grand children are swimming. Having worked with a police department for almost 10 years, I know that police and prosecutors have a great deal of latitude in how they enforce the law when it comes to someone shooting down such intrusions.
I think a drone hovering over your sunbathing wife or grandkids in a pool is not quite what I'm talking about, egregious and I would say a rare occurrence in the drone world. That's def a different story. That's a perv that probably needs his clock cleaned.
 
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