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Thinking about a new revolver. Trying to decide between a Smith & Wesson 10 or a 64. Primary use as a range gun and a home defense firearm.

Thoughts.
 
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One of each .....

Seriously, since I have both: I'm satisfied with either in that role. Not sure the difference is even worth considering. Get a good, solid used one at a great price and take whichever one you get a deal on. You get stainless with the 64, but if you're accurate with the first four you have room to spare with the 10 anyway.
 
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Depends if you like blued steel or stainless. They are otherwise the same.

Not sure if SW is making new 64's right now. But there should be plenty of 10's and 64's to choose from on the used market.
 

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Depends if you like blued steel or stainless. They are otherwise the same.

Not sure if SW is making new 64's right now. But there should be plenty of 10's and 64's to choose from on the used market.
The Model 10 with the pencil barrel is beautiful. Only available used, though.
 

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If humidity is a problem the M-64 might be the preferred choice but the bluing on the M-10s I own here in hot and humid North Carolina has held up well for over 25 years. Either model will be fine for range or home defense and will last long enough to be passed down to your heirs and their heirs.
 

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I have a Mdl-10 sitting a few feet away as I'm typing this, it pulls duty as home defense and teaching tool .
 

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Whichever revolver is in best shape and price , the M64 can be polished if needed. I had a M10-10 LE turn in , wasn't much to look at but still solid and safe.
 

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64 if corrsiven ie down south is more of a worry the rest a nice bull barrel model 10 ....You can still find LEO used model 10 often with holster and such for under 350
 

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Both are great. Get the first one you get a decent deal on.
 

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The S&W Military & Police revolvers have been with us for well over 100 years, as has the .38 Special cartridge for which the Model 10 and Model 64 are chambered. Probably one of the most sensible and effective personal defense weapons ever offered. Simple, uncomplicated, inherently safe due to the relative degree of effort required to fire (as well as the internal hammer block safety), minimal training time to achieve and maintain reasonable proficiency.

I carried a .45 in the Army (including combat tours in Vietnam), then I carried double-action revolvers as a cop for many years. Since retirement my usual preference has been a full-size 1911-style .45 pistol. But over the past couple of years I have had surgeries to my shoulder, elbow and wrist, affecting my hand and arm strength and tolerance to recoil. My solution was taking out the old (1979 production) Model 64 round-butt 2" .38 Special, which I can easily handle in my current condition, and I have decades of experience and "muscle memory" with.

I also have a 3" Model 10, several 4" S&W .38 and .357 revolvers. Any of them are excellent choices for personal or home defense.
 

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I have a couple of 10-5 pencil barrel Model 10s that I think are fine revolvers. In your shoes I would choose the one that seemed to be in the best condition.
 
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Smith & Wesson Model 10s in all configurations warm the cockles of my heart. Either blued or stainless steel would serve admirably.

I fancy that I can detect that the stainless steel Smith & Wesson K-Frames are slightly less smooth in action feel to the good ol' blued steel or nickel K-Frames. I'll even admit that notion is probably a figment of my imagination.

My very first handgun is a Smith & Wesson Model 10 Heavy Barrel which I still have and which has given flawless and stellar service through some very severe use since acquiring it in late 1975. To this day it still sees regular use, foul weather field service, and experimental handload test bed service.

Be right back. I gotta go make a quick Smith & Wesson Model 10 group photograph, showing one each of all the variants on hand here. There are additional Model 10s and earlier Military & Police revolvers on hand besides. In fact there are more Model 10/Military & Police revolvers on hand here than any other kind of gun. They're like Lays Potato Chips. They're awfully handy and I believe in 'em.

Or not.

It's raining outside just now, uncharacteristic for late July here. It did appear a bit cloudy earlier, but no rain clouds and no rain in the forecast.

Be thankful for small blessings.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Smith & Wesson Model 10s in all configurations warm the cockles of my heart. Either blued or stainless steel would serve admirably.

I fancy that I can detect that the stainless steel Smith & Wesson K-Frames are slightly less smooth in action feel to the good ol' blued steel or nickel K-Frames. I'll even admit that notion is probably a figment of my imagination.

My very first handgun is a Smith & Wesson Model 10 Heavy Barrel which I still have and which has given flawless and stellar service through some very severe use since acquiring it in late 1975. To this day it still sees regular use, foul weather field service, and experimental handload test bed service.

Be right back. I gotta go make a quick Smith & Wesson Model 10 group photograph, showing one each of all the variants on hand here. There are additional Model 10s and earlier Military & Police revolvers on hand besides. In fact there are more Model 10/Military & Police revolvers on hand here than any other kind of gun. They're like Lays Potato Chips. They're awfully handy and I believe in 'em.

Or not.

It's raining outside just now, uncharacteristic for late July here. It did appear a bit cloudy earlier, but no rain clouds and no rain in the forecast.

Be thankful for small blessings.
You are not mistaken. The blued guns a bit tighter and slicker.
 

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Crummy indoor lighting with crummy camera will have to do. Smith & Wesson Model 10 variants. From top to bottom:

6-inch: From 1969 - Graceful at the range and mechanically equal in accuracy to a Model 14 K-38 Masterpiece.

5-inch: From 1968 - Nickel ex-police department issue. 5-inch was not too common. Bit long for modern carry considerations. Very accurate and extracts much punch from best .38 Special loads.

4-inch Heavy Barrel: From 1971 - My first handgun. Supposedly less muzzle flip though I can't tell any difference between it and the standard 4-inch barrel below it. Very familiar balance for me.

4-inch standard barrel: From 1974 - The iconic Model 10 appearance. Populated law enforcement holsters for many years and popular with homeowners and sportsmen as well.

3-inch: From 1970 - Uncommonly seen barrel length that many claim is the "just right" length for K-Frame toters. Just as concealable and better performance than 2-inch can deliver.

2-inch: From 1996 - The Model 10 snub. Popular for it's bu'nesslike look and concealable. Soaks up recoil of the heaviest loads in ways that J-Frames never can. This one's a round butt, but square butt 2-inch guns were available.

Round butts were the original grip frame style until the appearance of the square butt configuration in 1905. For many years both butt styles could be had in any barrel length in blue or nickel. This was back when customer was king.

All barrel lengths and styles discontinued except the 4-inch Model 10 Heavy Barrel still appears in the Smith & Wesson catalog with round butt and the wretched lock hole in its side. None of the above will ever inadvertantly lock due to lock failure as they don't have a lock.

In the early decades of the 20th century the 6 1/2-inch was a standard length in addition to the 6-inch length. I don't see why both were offered simultaneously. I once had a 1910 example with 6 1/2-inch barrel. A few custom order revolvers were produced in 7 1/2 and 8-inch lengths, but were non-cataloged item as were the odd special order 2 or 3 inch revolvers produced. The 2-inch barrel wasn't made a part of the regular Smith & Wesson catalog until the early 1930s. In the late 1960s or early 1970s, a special contract order was filled for 2 1/2-inch barreled Model 10s. A few contract overrun 2 1/2-inch revolvers were sold on the market. Rare and high dollar collectibles now, these offered the full extraction stroke that is absent from the short ejector rod of the 2-inch Model 10. I wish I had an example of the 2 1/2-inch Model 10.

Never will lick cameras. Barrels were all even, but distortion shows the 6-inch pointing slightly downward while the 2-inch points slightly upward.
 

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Thinking about a new revolver. Trying to decide between a Smith & Wesson 10 or a 64. Primary use as a range gun and a home defense firearm.

Thoughts.
I have both.

In use, there's no difference between them that I've ever noticed. I prefer the looks of blued steel and wood grips but that just my personal preference. The S&W K-frame revolvers are just right in so many ways. I think you'd be pleased with either because there's no bad option.
 

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I would go for the 10. I shot a 64 owned by the manager of a Armored Car Co years ago when I invited them to our range for an afternoon of shooting steel plates. When the sun hit that stainless barrel the sights were all but impossible to see. I know you can paint them but I decided right then and there that blue was the way to go. I've had a 19 and now a 14 but never a stainless smith. I had a ruger stainless hunter .44 but it was almost always scoped. Recently I bought an older 2" CA Undercover in stainless but haven't had it out on the range yet. It though fills a different need then a 4" revolver. I like the older stainless of the earlier Stratford production because It's carried outdoors when I'm hot and sweaty and next to the skin sometimes. I can only assume with proper care it should stand up to the moisture better then blue steel.
 
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