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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The layout:
Our house sits ninety yards off a lightly traveled township road with a shared driveway. Beside us is a rental, currently occupied by a single working woman who isn't home much. Three hundred yards south of us, the road comes to a T-intersection with a more populated and traveled county road. One house, occupied by an elderly couple, sits between us and the county road, with perhaps ten houses between our road and a state highway. In short, no strangers breaking down, no neighbors needing help, not even one trick-or-treater in the seventeen years I have lived here.
At 5:00 this morning, I awake to "Mike, there is a man trying to get in the back door!". I jumped up, grabbed the Glock and told the wife to go to the back bedroom and call 9-1-1. I took the seven steps from my bed through the bathroom to the back door, and sure enough, a young man was indeed trying to get in. He had the screen door open and was rattling the locked entrance door knob. I saw that he had no weapons in his hands, was alone, and noted his appearance. I shouted to him several times "Get out of here! You are not supposed to be here. Leave now." He responded with mumbled mutterings about "c',mon I don't want trouble. Just open the door". He was clearly intoxicated, severely. He did, however back away from the door. I shouted for him to leave a few more times, and he disappeared from sight. I heard my wife on the phone with dispatch. He walked around on the screened-in back porch for a short while, then left my field of vision. He appeared to be trying to dial a number or text while on his phone.

I grabbed a pair of shorts and a t-shirt, and went around the house, checking windows. As I looked out front, I could see my truck door open, with what appeared to be a pair of feet sticking out. I thought he had perhaps laid down and passed out. I took my eye off him for about thirty seconds to put on a holster, and he disappeared. I noted to the dispatcher that no one was home at the renter's, because her car was not in the driveway.

I live in a remote part of the county, and there were only two deputies on the night shift. They both arrived at the same time, about fifteen minutes after the call, which isn't bad, considering. As soon as they pulled up the driveway, I opened the garage door, and with my hands raised holding my drivers license announced myself as the homeowner. The deputy quickly verified my identity, got a quick rundown of the situation, and they both began searching to the south, thinking he may have come from one of the neighboring houses. I walked to my property line with one of them, then returned to the front of our house as they continued their search.

My wife came out and asked me if we had checked the doors on the neighbor's house. I had not, since the neighbor wasn't home and both doors were closed, or at least appeared to be from a distance. I walked up to the front door, close enough to see that it was in fact slightly ajar. I got back to behind the cruiser with an Oh crap, get them on the radio and bring them back.

The two deputies returned and did a textbook armed entry. As soon as they got in, they immediately retreated and asked me who the woman was asleep on the couch. I gave them landlord permission to re-enter, and, of course it was the tenant. Passed out on the love seat across the room was the individual who had tried to get in my house. I identified them both and went back outside. After no small effort, they were both aroused and eventually bought outside for the discussion.

It turns out the guy is her cousin, and they had been out drinking last night. He was so hammered she bought him home, but since she was too drunk to drive, had caught a ride. Hence, no car in the driveway. He had woke up in a confused stupor, probably went outside to take a leak, and in his disoriented state, stumbled to the wrong door. The good news is that he didn't get shot or arrested. The bad news is that he had a bag of pot and a pipe laying on the floor beside him, so he will wind up paying a fine on a couple misdemeanors. He apologized, she apologized, and it all worked out.

Takeaways for me:
1) It all happens insanely fast. From asleep to gun drawn ready to perhaps kill a man in well under ten seconds
2) Adrenaline dumps are real, even when aware of them and trying to fight them off.
3) The police do a great job, but it takes them awhile to get there.
4) The thousands of training dollars I spent paid off. It is easy to surmise what have happened if I were a frightened, untrained armed homeowner.

Thank you, John Benner, David Bowie, Bill Posey and the rest of the instructors at TDI for having me ready when the stakes were high.
 

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Until now I thought there was just one David Bowie.

People unaccustomed to heavy drinking should leave the heavy drinking to those acustomed to heavy imbibery. :blink::nono:
 

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Glad you and yours are OK. I also live in a rural county the deputies are good(I've worked with some in other agency s) but like yours only two on at night and they wait for the second one before making their presence known. Stay trained stay safe. Pray to God but be ready to take care of yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the positive, encouraging feed-back. It takes about forty-eight hours for the effects of the stress of a situation like this one to diminish. I'm sure I will have some more thoughts and observations to put up.
 

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Wow. I have to say you handled that whole thing as well as could be expected. I'm not sure how I would respond in that scenario at 0500 with a guy trying to get in the house. My compliments to the OP for a well written summary and great post-event analysis.
 

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As a brief coda, note that this was the typical "drunk person at the wrong house" scenario. It's common.

While the situation almost allows a defensive shooting, it doesn't. Per the rules of firearm safety, "Know your target." Thank God you didn't shoot the intruder. Everything ended well because you exerted self-control and good sense. Great story and a good lesson.
 

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Good job, Mike. All's well that ends well. Now you know that when your neighbor's car is not in the driveway that does not necessarily mean she is not home. Good info.
 

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Good thing you are not a drunk or pothead. I get tired of addicts infecting society. Now you see what happens when people lose their dignity and self-control. It could have been much worse if not for a level headed, concerned citizen.
 

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Love happy endings... so why did the kid go into your truck? that has to be weird...
 
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