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A friend came by today for some practice, and he had two Glocks set up with Trijicon RMR sights, and he let me use one as we did various drills and ran thru multiple scenario training.

About 4 hours and I was getting very use to the sight. I liked it very much however, I also ran my carry gun with standard sights, and for me, there was no real advantage.

I can see how they are superior for slow fire and distance shooting, and especially for someone who is a new shooter. And they do have that cool factor.

With much of my shooting being close quarter style, flash sight style shooting, I found that there was little difference for me in seeing an E-dot or a front sight dot superimposed over the target.
Often times my shooting at closer distance is well below the line of sight, and using peripheral vision for muzzle alignment, and here the E-dot was not even helpful at all.

It was good to be able to work with the RDS since they seem to be the thing today, and to really assess it for myself.

I can certainly see how they would be useful for some applications, but I can now say with certainty that I’m satisfied with regular sights and much like the laser when it was the newest thing, will not be jumping on this wagon either.
 

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I just can't overcome the thought that that big lump on the top of my gun will catch on everything and never be in proper alignment - guess I'm just irreparably old school.
 

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A friend came by today for some practice, and he had two Glocks set up with Trijicon RMR sights, and he let me use one as we did various drills and ran thru multiple scenario training.

About 4 hours and I was getting very use to the sight. I liked it very much however, I also ran my carry gun with standard sights, and for me, there was no real advantage.

I can see how they are superior for slow fire and distance shooting, and especially for someone who is a new shooter. And they do have that cool factor.

With much of my shooting being close quarter style, flash sight style shooting, I found that there was little difference for me in seeing an E-dot or a front sight dot superimposed over the target.
Often times my shooting at closer distance is well below the line of sight, and using peripheral vision for muzzle alignment, and here the E-dot was not even helpful at all.

It was good to be able to work with the RDS since they seem to be the thing today, and to really assess it for myself.

I can certainly see how they would be useful for some applications, but I can now say with certainty that I’m satisfied with regular sights and much like the laser when it was the newest thing, will not be jumping on this wagon either.
On a shot timer, reflexive sights slow me down out of the holster out to about ten yards. As much as I like them for longer shots, I prefer irons overall.
 

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I just can't overcome the thought that that big lump on the top of my gun will catch on everything and never be in proper alignment - guess I'm just irreparably old school.
I've carried reflexive-sight mounted pistols off and on for ten years, and have never had them catch on anything.
 

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My first reaction to a canik with from the factory RDS was “That thing will get me killed. I should have gone with my first reaction. Of course I didn’t.

James Yeager did 3 videos on his Canik with RDS experiences. Video 1...everything that are good about a RDS on a long gun, they are good for on a pistol. Video 2 ... dont really remember, but it was positive. In my mind that sealed the deal.

I love RDS on my ARs, so off to the gun store I went, and got another Canik, with from the factory RDS. After some fairly extensive shooting with it, my thoughts on a RDS on a carry pistol are the same as when I first looked at one. Ie “That thing will get me killed.”

I shoot more accurately and once the dot is acquired, easily, with a RDS. It’s darn fun. And I dont like it at all for crunch time.

OH! I almost forgot...Video 3 ... Yeager doesn’t recommen. Yeah, I should have made it to video 3 before buying, lol.
 

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To each there own but glad you got to test before buying. I have about 6 pistols with them and absolutely love them for “open” competitions and edc. They do take getting used to and take some learning to acquire but I would highly recommend if someone is going to carry one daily to take a specific red dot pistol course from a reputable group. The best way to help people find them upon presenting is to just look for the sights like normal and you’ll naturally find it. Distance shots are a HUGE advantage like you said. That helped me seal the deal making easy shots at 50yds and with active shooters becoming a more common occurrence, i wanted every advantage as possible. I do really like irons also though!


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Big fan of RDS on a rifle. Bought a RDS for my M&P. Trained with it for 3-4 weeks. Sold the M&P RDS. Not a fan for handguns. That's my story & I'm sticking to it! 😊
 

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I like it for longer shots, primarily as a vision issue as I'm discovering beyond 20 yards my ability to focus on the front sight causes problems seeing the target.
 
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To each there own but glad you got to test before buying. I have about 6 pistols with them and absolutely love them for “open” competitions and edc. They do take getting used to and take some learning to acquire but I would highly recommend if someone is going to carry one daily to take a specific red dot pistol course from a reputable group. The best way to help people find them upon presenting is to just look for the sights like normal and you’ll naturally find it. Distance shots are a HUGE advantage like you said. That helped me seal the deal making easy shots at 50yds and with active shooters becoming a more common occurrence, i wanted every advantage as possible. I do really like irons also though!
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They're becoming more prevalent in the local IDPA matches I attend and 3Gun matches (for the open guys). Mostly the older guys that are having vision issues. I'm not there yet, but I can see them coming in my future.

I've got mono-vision shooting glasses set up for pistol, so I can see the front sight with my right eye and TGTs/distance with my left. But for 3Gun I have to go with my regular glasses due to the LPVO on my carbine and the shotgun. It makes the Texas star that much more interesting. I find myself going with the shotgun more on the small pistol or shotgun steel.
 

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I bought a GLock 19 MOS and mounted a Trijicon RMR on it. I liked it, but I did not find it truly superior to iron sights, even though I don't see my iron sights razor sharp without a corrective lens. I have not carried my G19 MOS in a couple of years.
 

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A friend came by today for some practice, and he had two Glocks set up with Trijicon RMR sights, and he let me use one as we did various drills and ran thru multiple scenario training.

About 4 hours and I was getting very use to the sight. I liked it very much however, I also ran my carry gun with standard sights, and for me, there was no real advantage.

I can see how they are superior for slow fire and distance shooting, and especially for someone who is a new shooter. And they do have that cool factor.

With much of my shooting being close quarter style, flash sight style shooting, I found that there was little difference for me in seeing an E-dot or a front sight dot superimposed over the target.
Often times my shooting at closer distance is well below the line of sight, and using peripheral vision for muzzle alignment, and here the E-dot was not even helpful at all.

It was good to be able to work with the RDS since they seem to be the thing today, and to really assess it for myself.

I can certainly see how they would be useful for some applications, but I can now say with certainty that I’m satisfied with regular sights and much like the laser when it was the newest thing, will not be jumping on this wagon either.
That was exactly my take away as well. For me, out to 25 yards there was no advantage.
 

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I bought a GLock 19 MOS and mounted a Trijicon RMR on it. I liked it, but I did not find it truly superior to iron sights, even though I don't see my iron sights razor sharp without a corrective lens. I have not carried my G19 MOS in a couple of years.
Which is why I am selling my G45. It does nothing for me, I tried to like it. A Glock is a Glock, no matter what you do you can't fix a Glock trigger.
 

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There's some ways to do the close in shooting a little different, you can basically use the "window" of the MRDS as a giant ghost ring sight.

A big issue I have with MRDS at close range is that a lot of people get the optics with the 3MOA dot reticle, if performing close range headshots people tend to wait and try and get that pin prick of a dot centered in the head box and focus too much on pristine sight picture and thus feel it takes too long.

A larger dot and a more "sloppy" sight picture cures that.

In terms of sight picture in general, where a lot of people get hung up is sight focus vs target focus, with the MRDS you need to do target forcus and work on keeping the dot u your focal plane vs sight focus aka chasing the dot.

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It isn't an all or nothing for me. I only have one G23 with an RDS. I have found it to be a useful tool, albeit it does have a learning curve. In a nutshell:

339424


1) Speed - yes and no. In the dark it is faster than night sights - once I adjusted to it.

2) Distance - amazing. I only wish I had been able to use one back when I was shooting in competition. 50 and 100 yard shots are a piece of cake.

3) Carry - so so. It takes a dedicated holster and the "feel" is odd for belt carry. I did find that I can carry it in a shoulder holster, made for a G19, and all the carry issues are not apparent.

My solution is simple. If I feel the need to carry a larger backup, the RDS in the shoulder holster is the berries. If I have to face someone at extended distances, the RDS would be the weapon of choice - provided I didn't have a rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
In terms of sight picture in general, where a lot of people get hung up is sight focus vs target focus, with the MRDS you need to do target forcus and work on keeping the dot u your focal plane vs sight focus aka chasing the dot.

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I have never had an issue with sight vs target focus, and I can’t really explain why.

For self induced panic style shooting I have adopted a hybrid approach, sort of a split vision technique where I am not focusing on either the front sight or the “ threat”, but see both together, although neither are clear.

This works very well for me from 3 to maybe a bit over ten yards where I need to make the fastest shot I can, but want a degree of accuracy.

I think I picked this up from the split vision technique in traditional archery over the years.

The MRDS worked very well when doing this yesterday, but it took me a little bit to adjust. After that, a dot became a dot, regardless of dotted from sight or RDS.
 
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I have never had an issue with sight vs target focus, and I can’t really explain why.

For self induced panic style shooting I have adopted a hybrid approach, sort of a split vision technique where I am not focusing on either the front sight or the “ threat”, but see both together, although neither are clear.

This works very well for me from 3 to maybe a bit over ten yards where I need to make the fastest shot I can, but want a degree of accuracy.

I think I picked this up from the split vision technique in traditional archery over the years.

The MRDS worked very well when doing this yesterday, but it took me a little bit to adjust. After that, a dot became a dot, regardless of dotted from sight or RDS.
So some people's eyes do work different, the wife can work both eyes independently and keep an eye on the front sight and target and keep them in pretty good clarity.

What you are describing is what's kind of like a "Type 2 focus" (credited to Brian Enos in his book) where the sights are in the peripheral view with more focus on the target, again depending on eye sight this presents a little differently for some.

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Threat focus is what your body does naturally. For obvious reasons we focus on the threat to give us the best chance at a fast reaction. The human body is a marvel at self protection with no training what so ever.
"Tunnel vision" is also a natural reaction with the purpose of zeroing in on that threat. We crouch and space our feet to get ready for movement in any direction, we face the threat so as to get optimal vision and reaction and our heart rate increases and the body dumps adrenaline for speed and power enhancement.
Would it not be better to enhance our natural reactions than to try and "cross wire" the whole thing?

Why on earth anyone would try to confuse that excellent natural reaction with "front sight focus" is just beyond baffling to me.

Focus on the threat( because your doing it anyway) and bring the gun up into that natural focus. Both eyes open and a blurry front sight and you don't have to go searching for what to shoot at, your already looking at it. You will make excellent accurate hits that way. Trust your body to do its job.

Now if I am hunting or target shooting its not a threat so I can take my time and super focus on whatever I want to make the shot. Little tiny precise groups are not the goal of self defense shooting. Accuracy is paramount but, precision is unnecessary.
 
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