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So long story short, I paid extra for a chromed line barrel and would like to maintain its value outside of normal wear. Does the much more easily found 7.62 steel casings degrade it faster or not? I can’t find any conclusive information and hope that someone here would have first hand experience or very accurate 2nd hand knowledge.
 

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Obviously steel cased ammunition won't affect the barrel's bore. Don't know about long term effects on chambers.

I've only dabbled with steel cased ammunition in .45 ACP, .223, and 7.62X39 as cheap "burnin' ammo" for plinking sessions. I don't know much about differences in wear characteristics, but don't much like the idea of steel cases, even mild steel cases clunking their way through my guns actions and chambers.

Since I hand load I'm not much interested in buying steel cased ammunition beyond an academic interest.
 

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I have shot thousands of cheap steel cased ammo in my AR's and AK's with zero problems other than being somewhat dirtier. I don't shoot it in my handguns.
 

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Shooting steel-cased ammo is grounds for punishment for us range-brass scroungers.
 

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During World War II there were shortages of many strategic materials, including copper (which is the key element in cartridge brass and bullet jacket material). As a war time expedient both cartridge cases and bullet jackets were made of mild steel, which is much softer and more ductile than the steel alloys used in firearms barrels or receivers.

As I recall there were two problems to overcome in these developments. The first was corrosion (rust), and the second was lubricity. For bullet jackets these issues were resolved by applying a copper wash (light copper plating) of the jacket surfaces. For cartridge cases the solution was coating the cases with either varnish or shellac, which provided some corrosion resistance while also improving lubricity during functioning in automatic and semi-auto firearms.

My reading on this subject commented on research done on barrel life, with the results indicating that wear to the rifling was within an acceptable range (bearing in mind that military thoughts on this are quite different than those of an individual caring for his own personally owned firearms).

Over the years I have used quite a bit of steel-cased ammo and steel-jacketed bullets of US GI surplus origin. Other than the necessity for good cleaning procedures (good old GI surplus bore solvent and plenty of bronze bore brushes) I can recall no negative issues. My use was in .30 Carbine, .30 M2 Ball, and .45ACP.
 

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The only real big no no for steel cased is in revolvers.
The cases get stuck and you have to tap them out!


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I think that the only ammo I've ever put through my SKS has been steel cased. No problems there.

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What is it in a firearm design that makes it "designed for steel cases"?
 
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What is it in a firearm design that makes it "designed for steel cases"?
From my understanding it is how they size/shape the chamber?

Not real sure but I've been told many times that AK's like steal cased ammo because that is all the comm-bloc countries used in them.

I know that mine shoots it quite well so no reason to buy the more expensive stuff, so there is that.
 

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It's not the steel cases that wear the bore, it's the bimetal bullets. Steel cases carbon up your chamber and can mildly accelerate wear on the extractor hook.

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Buy it cheap, stack it deep. Cheap steel ammo is 90% of all the ammo that I shoot. If your gun does not run properly with steel case ammo, your gun does not work properly.

Unless you are trying to reload, or want quality defensive ammo that all comes in brass cases, I see no real point in buying brass cased ammo as it works just as well and is cheaper.
 

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During World War II there were shortages of many strategic materials, including copper (which is the key element in cartridge brass and bullet jacket material). As a war time expedient both cartridge cases and bullet jackets were made of mild steel, which is much softer and more ductile than the steel alloys used in firearms barrels or receivers.

As I recall there were two problems to overcome in these developments. The first was corrosion (rust), and the second was lubricity. For bullet jackets these issues were resolved by applying a copper wash (light copper plating) of the jacket surfaces. For cartridge cases the solution was coating the cases with either varnish or shellac, which provided some corrosion resistance while also improving lubricity during functioning in automatic and semi-auto firearms.

My reading on this subject commented on research done on barrel life, with the results indicating that wear to the rifling was within an acceptable range (bearing in mind that military thoughts on this are quite different than those of an individual caring for his own personally owned firearms).

Over the years I have used quite a bit of steel-cased ammo and steel-jacketed bullets of US GI surplus origin. Other than the necessity for good cleaning procedures (good old GI surplus bore solvent and plenty of bronze bore brushes) I can recall no negative issues. My use was in .30 Carbine, .30 M2 Ball, and .45ACP.
I've used a bit of the World War II .30 Carbine and .45 ACP. Reloaded it too, mostly because some loading manual said one couldn't. Don't recall about the .30 Carbine, but the .45 ACP primer pocket was some odd size, somewhere between the .175 of the small pistol primer and the .210 of the large pistol primer. Seems like it took a .204 boxer primer, perhaps to keep anyone from later reloading the case.

Anyway, I reamed the primer pockets out to .210, loaded 'em up and fired 'em off in my 1918 Colt 1911. That was over 40 years ago and I still see those five or six cases drift through whenever I prepare large batches of "general purpose" loads for the .45 ACP. Don't know how many times those cases have been reloaded and without trimming either.

Same for the .30 Carbine. A few come through whenever I get in a big reloading way to feed the Carbine, left over from early experimentation in my youth.

I think rust would be the big bug-a-boo in reloading boxer primed steel cases. Rusted ones would almost have to have diminished strength characteristics.
 

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I have more malfunctions with steel and aluminum cased ammo, so I avoid both.
Many here are fine with them, and that's good info. That said...

I do not buy, or use steel or aluminum cased ammo.

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Shooting steel-cased ammo is grounds for punishment for us range-brass scroungers.
I like to shoot aluminum cased just to drive you guys nuts...:danceban:
 

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I had more problems with steel than brass ammo too, but never with Tula steel cased ammo. Some people will have problems with one particular brand of steel or aluminum cased ammo, and then go on to assume and make blanketed statements about ALL of that kind of ammo when, just with some brass ammo, their gun might not have liked that one brand of ammo...

I buy it all the time for years for both my rifles and handguns... Nothing has broke or worn down prematurely because of it.
 
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