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This is no good answer at all.

For me steel is more durable, however it's a matter of aesthetics. Steel is better able to endure as a presence in my gun safe. The other two materials? Not so much.
 
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Discussion Starter #42
I was reading somewhere that all things being equal, both being cared for properly... The Polymer frame is more durable and will last longer than Aluminum, can anyone confirm this claim?
 

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Much as I detest polymer, from my superficial observations I would agree with that claim QuickQuestionAnon.

Aluminum alloys are more prone to unsightly wear and tear than either steel or polymer. Aluminum alloys don't seem to do stress as well as the other two component materials either. Aluminum work hardens. Aluminum cracks, screw threads strip, pin holes hog-wallow out. Aluminum alloy never can be finished in a manner that pleases the eye. It doesn't match the steel components with which it is mated and the finishes wear more quickly.

I have a single revolver, a Smith & Wesson Model 642 with an aluminum frame. It's served mostly as my wife's carry gun since acquisition in 1998. I've seen enough that I'm done with aluminum as a revolver frame component. I don't even care for the weight savings that aluminum alloys afford.

Otherwise, there's a Ruger 10/22 here with its aluminum alloy receiver, a Ruger Model 77V with an aluminum floor plate, a Winchester Model 190 .22 rifle with aluminum receiver and trigger assembly housing, and of course the Colt AR 15 with its aluminum upper and lower. If each one of those firearms were all-steel I'd like 'em a whole bunch better, no matter what current thinking is on the subject.
 
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Having worked in an industry engineering and manufacturing various metal and plastic products....

You can't really answer this question.

There are total garbage, cheap steel grades out there, made by garbage companies. They're terrible. Look at them funny and they'll rust through. Get them a wee bit too cold and they'll crack.

There are absolutely amazing polymers out there that are indestructible.

So it all depends. I know people like to knock things like "plastic" and "glue" (vs say rivets or welds)....but I've come to honestly appreciate modern materials. There is no reason just because it is plastic and not metal to assume that it can't be more durable, more comfortable, lighter, etc than steel (or aluminum). They use adhesives in automobiles all the time and they're incredibly strong, easy to apply, and last forever.
 

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These are the oldest guns I own, some form of steel, wood, mother of pearl and various other metal trimmings for decoration. Been passed down for generations, and are somewhere around 225 years old.

The one in the front falls apart if you look at it wrong. The one in the rear actually still functions, but would likely explode in the shooter’s hands if you actually tried to fire it.

Point being, I guess...buy what appeals to you, and don’t worry too much about it lasting forever. Any gun from a reputable maker with a frame made of any of those materials should not experience a failure in your lifetime. But nothing lasts forever, either. Buy what you like and enjoy the hell out of it, maybe your falling apart Glock/S&W/Colt will be gracing your descendants mantle in a couple hundred years.


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Steel for the win in my opinion. It's the #1 material I prefer my firearms to consist of. Aluminum alloy is OK as long as the firearm is designed well (Beretta 92 & SIG P226 for example). The only plastic I will accept on my firearm is in the grips, magazine follower, and magazine base plate.
 

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Seems to me that the discussion of polymer frames does not seem to include the fact that it in reality, they are a hybrid frame, with steel rail inserts for the slide supported by a polymer base.
 

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I think the question should be which frame will last longer - Aluminum frame with aluminum rails or polymer frame with STEEL rails. In this comparison I will bet on polymer frame with steel rail inserts. Or put another way Glock over Sig P series.

If you want heavy then total steel frame. But most people concerned about weight.
 

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Yeah, heavy, total steel frame works for a few of us.
 
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If you want heavy then total steel frame. But most people concerned about weight.
Yes I am concerned about weight. My concern is if the firearm is too light. I noticed that recoil with plastic framed pistols was significantly more than metal based ones. I prefer my advantage in lower recoil when firing a weapon than it being lighter for carry.

Also the stronger the material used equates out to less of it needed for an overall build. My all steel CZ-75 compact is significantly slimmer and less bulky than the aluminum alloy and plastic based compact pistols that I have seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
So would it be fair to say that all things being equal, if I were to take care of both pistols properly, the Glock 17 frame would outlast the Beretta 92X Centurion frame?

333442
 

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you ask way too many Quck Questions.
 
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