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Bumper did it again. We were talking about how neither of us cares too much for a small plastic gun, and I just had another thought.

Most of the semiautomatic pistols I have been exposed to, I dare say perhaps all of them, have had polymer or alloy frames and steel slides. I thought about it and realized you know what, I don't have just a heck of a whole lot of experience with an all steel semiautomatic.

I was born in '81 after all. Plastic semiautomatics are a fact of life to me.

Maybe that's really why I think revolvers are so great. They are after all solid metal, even if that metal is aluminum sometimes. I think revolver, I think big hunk of steel. I think semi, I think little piece of plastic. That's been my experience, and most of the guns out there are semiautomatics with polymer/plastic/lightweight alloy frames with heavy metal slides.

But should it really matter? Is there some kind of significant advantage of an all steel gun over the polymer and plastic wonders that I'm used to? If anything it seems the more modern plastic/polymer design should be better. Or is it all in one's head?
 

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That's Neat

I'm older than you are & when I think "Semi~Auto"...I think BLUE or STAINLESS STEEL & walnut grips...with the modern New Fangled ones being made out of cheapo plastic. :biggrin:
 

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QKShooter said:
I'm older than you are & when I think "Semi~Auto"...I think BLUE or STAINLESS STEEL & walnut grips...with the modern New Fangled ones being made out of cheapo plastic. :biggrin:
I'm with you, QKShooter, blued steel or stainless, wood grips, leather holsters. About as "unconventional" as I get are the AlumaGrips on my latest 1911. I do love those.... :wink:
 

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weight is about the only advanatae to polymer and slimmer grip for more rounds.... my springfield xd makes a nice lightweight carry gun holds 13 rounds of 9mm... my colt cobra also makes a nice super lightweight carry gun but only holds 6 of38 sp so for same size package i get lot more round..



Also if ya got to pistol whip someone a all steel frame would work a lot better :biggrin:
 

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The polymers are primarily used because of lighter weight and they stand up against the elements...pretty darn tuff...I've never minded the weight and personally think it helps in overall control for larger calibers. The polymers also give the manufacturers options for various colors...seems a lot of folks want a "pretty" gun.....I'll hold off on those til I start seeing colored hammers!
 

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I like my poly guns for the above mentioned reasons. It is pretty too.....in all black. Also no finish to wear off it either.
 

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Actually

My very first "Introduction" to any sort of plastic firearm was the Remington NYLON 66 .22 LR Rifle Lightweight .22 with its nylon stocks & a few plastic parts used in its bright chrome receiver. I STILL have that amazing little rifle and it's a fantastic and accurate little tube fed plinker. It has NEVER had a FTFeed or fail to FTfire!!!
 

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Polymers are lighter which is the primary reason so many manufactures are going that route, along with being resistant to environmental elements; however polymer does stand up to heavy recoil better than metals. Try to find a Bren 10 that is not cracked at the slide stop/takedown pin, or a Glock 10mm that is cracked, and the various alloy framed guns usually come with warnings about excessive shooting with high pressure loads. Polymer frames achieve the weight reduction of the alloys while being more durable than steel. I am very practical, I don't allow form to take precedent over function, there is nothing aesthetically pleasing about a Glock, I love a 2 tone 1911 with all the bells and whistles and custom wood grip panels, but I carry Glocks.
 

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I was sitting here reading and thinking I wanted to chime in about plastic guns but wanted to talk about shotguns. Since the Nylon 66 got entered in I'll go ahead. I grew up with all steel rifles and shotguns. Several years back I got a Benelli Nova 12 ga. 3 1/2" Mag for turkey hunting. AWSOME firearm and load!!! The gun is so light I can trek around all day with it and 3 rounds in it. No worry about rain, mud, etc. Touch that thing off and it is a whole new world! It never fails to kill even if ONLY on the recoil pad end. I love the thing till then. Yep I can put a reducer in it but then I may as well carry a steel shotgun. As far as I can see it holds up to way bigger pressures than any CC gun is going to make and keeps on booming. Plastic has a place in firearms as far as I'm concerned and I like it so far. You pay in recoil some but as far as a carry gun I don't really see that much recoil compaired to the other hunting application handguns I use. Just my $.02 worth though. QK I envy you as I always wanted a 66. You seen the prices lately???
 

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I think I'm pretty much the ''ol' fart'' round here - born end of war when no gun had even a lick of plastic!!

All my really active (most active) shooting years, which were approx late 70's thru later 90's - competition stuff - I hardly even thought of anything plastic.... certainly nothing that I actually owned and shot. Most competitive shooting was with my trusty 686 or my BHP.

Finally, I succumbed to temptation and my first plastic was P95, followed by P97 - and of course I started trying other folk's Glocks etc. I was pleasantly surprised overall and now accept some platforms as being well worthy of attention... preferring the mid to larger sizes than the miniscule ones. Even my SW99 has become quite a useful addition, altho ergonomics far from ideal

Mostly tho when it comes to carry - I am still steel pretty much thru and thru. SIG, SP, BHP, even larger revo's - I just prefer the heft and weight.
 

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Euclidean said:
I was born in '81 after all. Plastic semiautomatics are a fact of life to me.
I was also born in 81, and plastic semi-autos feel weird to me. I do own two though, a Kimber Polymer and a Kahr PM9.

My carry guns are steel. If I run out of ammo, I want an effective club...
 

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:biggrin: I"M the "old Fart" here........born in 53......I remember that you had a choice of Blue or Nickel.that was it! Until the first stainless steel guns came out. it was Smith model 60's at 350.00 <unheard scalping price as it was 165.00 new, WHEN you could suck up to a dealer friend and get one> or a Model 66 at the same price range.<they sold for 185.00 retail but scalped for 350.00 as well> Aluminum frame guns were the rage as well. I can't remember what my first plastic gun was, but I know it was a very long time ago. I'll buy plastic, blue, nickel, or staiunless, no preference here, cuz ya can't have enough toys :biggrin:
 

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I can remember when aluminum frame pistols were not really trusted. Now if it's built by a good gun company, has been used by a fair number of shooters without problems, then 'plastic' is fine by me. The polymers used in guns are tough, don't rust, and are light. These are all good for a CCW.
 

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damm talk about thread resurection LOL original thread was at March 31st, 2005, 09:50 PM and a reply today ... heck its all good as some topics are timeless LOL
 

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I just bought my first polymer gun XD45C. I bought it because I think plastiguns make great CCWs. After all, they are virtually indestructible, reliable, easy to carry, and inexpensive enough to be relatively expendable. This little XD45C can hold up to 13 rounds of .45 ACP. With the shorty magazine it still holds 10+1 rounds.
 

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A reasonable person could go either way with this one. But in my (admittedly limited) experience, a good gun is a good gun- - stainless steel, blued steel, alloy, polymer, what have you. I've had and shot some of each.

The old wood and steel autos are durable and feel solid. When I'm in a traditional mood, I've got a 1911. Some of the polymer ones amaze me with their capacity, accuracy and durability. When those things spring to the forefront of my mind, my XD45 comes out of the drawer.

Ditto with revolvers- a good solid one, with blued steel and walnut grips is cool. A stainless or alloy one with rubber handles can do the job, too.

I like'em all, if they're good, but sometimes for different reasons.
 

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Ok ill go ahead and take the bait lol . For me " combat tupperware " makes sense for a couple of reasons 1. is weight and 2. is its friendly , where metal can take on the temp of the moment either hot or cold , plastic normaly feels pretty neutral . I dont take pride in my plastic framed pistols the same as i do others , but i do confess to using them more for concealed carry due to the points listed .
 

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Got Sig?

I don't mind owning my first polymer pistol (a SigPro2022), since I am not the first customer.

Mag44LaF
 

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Wow. I'm old enough to remember having to crank start a car. Today, through the miracle of polymyers and ceramics, we have engine blocks that are poured much like a piece of pottery. They do not wear, they weigh next to nothing , and they are the wave of the future!

For me, MASS gets the edge. I like the mass of a full steel weapon. This is a personal opinion, and really has nothing to do with the relative effectiveness of the gun. I grew up with mass. Mass is whear I feel most comfortable. Those born after 1950 have a different feel, a different perspective. No harm, no foul. There are plenty of "Plastic" high performers out there that are as good if not better than my 5 pound MASS-R-Ator!!
 

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But should it really matter? Is there some kind of significant advantage of an all steel gun over the polymer and plastic wonders that I'm used to?
It all comes down to the design of the specific pistol. Some plastic jobs don't stand up well to the abuse; but then the same can be said of the brittle nature of some ultra-thin steel numbers, or aluminum unless it's forged and properly built-up to withstand the abuse. The risk comes when pushing a design goal to its limit. At those limits come failures, material fatigue, etc. Don't want that? Just go with a tried-and-true design, regardless of type. ie, an all-steel 1911 Government model, a polymer Glock, a forged alum/scandium/titanium lightweight revolver, and so on.

Hey, I've had a Browning BDM since inception, so what do I know! But then, I do have a CZ P01, so perhaps I'm bright enough to get by. Ah, me. Choices, choices. :yup:
 
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