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Discussion Starter #1
Hello gents.

If you are going to store your Glock, should you pull the trigger first and let it "rest" that way?

I see allot of gents do that on YouTube and wondered if that's how one is supposed to store a striker fired pistol. Will it hurt the pistol if not done or done??

Any insights will be appreciated - Thanks in advance.
 

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There's no reason, or benefit, to do that. Besides, shouldn't it be loaded and ready to go?
Mine is always ready to go I don't see a point to it either and mine does not stand up by itself and go boom. :smile:
 

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I'd just leave the trigger alone. Mine has been loaded since I got it in 2012 with exception to cleaning and dry fire practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks gents!

I don't keep my guns loaded in my safe... I guess I could. Just never did. Not sure why lol.
 

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If you unload the gun then pull the trigger while pointed in a safe direction and it doesn't go boom you can be reasonably certain that it will not just go off if someone else picks it up. Other than that no need to.
 

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Six Glocks...at least three are always ready to go...:yup::hand9:
 
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The only thing i was told was not to load the magazine to max, if it was to stay unused but at ready. considering the extended Ruger magazines are hard to come by these days. I want to make sure i don't wear out the magazine spring before i get to use it.
 
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The only thing i was told was not to load the magazine to max, if it was to stay unused but at ready. considering the extended Ruger magazines are hard to come by these days. I want to make sure i don't wear out the magazine spring before i get to use it.
You will not wear out a magazine spring by keeping it compressed. This is probably one of the biggest myths in the firearm community.

Constant compression and decompression will wear out a spring faster than keeping it in one state or the other, and even then it takes a LOT of compressions/decompressions to do so.

The good news is that springs are designed to compress and decompress, and magazines are designed to hold their full capacity. As such, have no fear in leaving magazines fully loaded for extended periods. It's what they were built to do and unless you've got some janky khyber pass POS gun you found in a sewer you will not have any problems using the magazine as it was designed to be used.

There have been 1911 magazines that were loaded for 50+ years and still worked just fine.



As for the OP, guns going into my safe are always unloaded and uncocked. It's just something I was taught to do and it's a habit. As such, I pull the trigger on my striker guns after unloading them and verifying they are unloaded 3 times. It doesn't matter either way really. You can leave them cocked and it will be just fine.

This is, of course, assuming you have another firearm for home defense. I have a loaded shotgun by the bed for bumps in the night. If you do not have a dedicated home defense firearm I'd echo the others in saying it might be a better idea to keep your Glock loaded and holstered on the nightstand.
 

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Alex has it right....

American Handgunner
May-June, 2003
by John S. Layman

(C/O American Handgunner Magazine)
The shooting sports are full of some of the most knowledgeable and capable people you'll meet anywhere. I've been impressed consistently with the abilities of those I meet at the range to diagnose and fix a gun problem with as little as some spray lube and a cotton swab. However, sometimes a myth will creep into the folklore.

The magazine spring myth has been around for many years and is growing in popularity. It goes something like this: "You should unload your magazines when they're not in use or the spring will weaken causing failures to feed." This has gone as far as shooting competitors actually unloading their magazines between stages to extend the life of their springs. A variant of this myth is: "You should never load a magazine to capacity and should always leave it one round short." What if you need that round some day?

Recently, I read an article in a gun magazine suggesting you rotate your magazines so the ones not in use can "recover and rest." The same author uses the phrase "spring-set" to describe weakness of a spring because it was compressed for a long time. Hogwash. There's nothing further from the truth. Springs don't care how long they're compressed and don't require rest, recreation or even a vacation from time to time.

Shameful Spring Benders

To put this one to rest, you have to understand creep. Creep is the slow flow of a non-ferric metal like copper, brass and lead under force. At temperatures outside of a furnace, steel doesn't have any appreciable creep. Under most conditions, steel flexes and then returns to its original shape. When pushed past its elastic limit, steel will bend and not return to its original shape. All designers of well-made magazines make sure the spring never approaches the elastic limit when the magazine is fully loaded. Honest. This means the spring will not weaken when the magazine is fully loaded -- not even over an extended time. Like 50 years. American Handgunner recently ran a story about a magazine full of .45 ACP that had been sitting since WWII and it ran just fine on the first try. So there you go.
Springs are springs, whether they're magazine springs, hammer springs, or striker springs.....

Cycling springs is the cause of spring failure, NOT static compression.
 

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If the Glock is going to be put into a safe unloaded then I decock it; I see not reason to leave it cocked when empty.
 
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Hello gents.

If you are going to store your Glock, should you pull the trigger first and let it "rest" that way?

I see allot of gents do that on YouTube and wondered if that's how one is supposed to store a striker fired pistol. Will it hurt the pistol if not done or done??

Any insights will be appreciated - Thanks in advance.
Assuming you are doing this at home...Firing a round prior to putting the gun away is a waste of a bullet and could be very dangerous.
 

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Assuming you are doing this at home...Firing a round prior to putting the gun away is a waste of a bullet and could be very dangerous.
He is not firing a round, he is "dropping the hammer" on an empty chamber to remove tension from the trigger spring, so no wasted ammo.........
To the OP, I do this for weapons that are in the safe, but my HD and EDC guns stay lockied an loaded at all times. I only do it on my safe guns because it is what I was taught when I was young and its habit.
 
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Assuming you are doing this at home...Firing a round prior to putting the gun away is a waste of a bullet and could be very dangerous.
I think he means unloading it before pulling the trigger, but certainly it bears repeating that verification of unloaded status should be conducted multiple times prior to pulling the trigger and all safety rules very much still apply.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Some great reply's - thanks Gents!! Some reply's that kind of didn't see coming though funny may need the following to help clear things up :).

Assumptions for my original post lol:

As I said in a follow-up post - I unload my weapons before "safing" them, hence when I pull the trigger, it's on an empty weapon.

I didn't ask if I should have a loaded weapon in my house at all times LOL!! Though your concern is endearing lol... If I am putting a weapon in the safe, clearly I feel I don't need that weapon handy :). However, if you wish to speculate as to if I have more than one firearm (as you have been lol), feel free to assume that I do if that'll make you feel better :)!!! LOL!!

Good times!! Thanks again guys!
 

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Appreciate the update on Magazines being loaded to max... prefer to have it ready to go, if needed.
 

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Alex has it right....

American Handgunner
May-June, 2003
by John S. Layman

(C/O American Handgunner Magazine)


Springs are springs, whether they're magazine springs, hammer springs, or striker springs.....

Cycling springs is the cause of spring failure, NOT static compression.
In contrast to a gun magazine opinion, here's is Wolff Gunsprings opinion, which being experts in gun springs should carry some weight. My opinion is if you don't need a magazine to be loaded for expected or possible immediate use, why do so.

From Wolff gunsprings FAQs:
"More recently higher capacity magazine have become popular. These are designed to hold more rounds with less spring material often in the same space. This puts more stress on the spring and will cause it to fatigue at a faster rate. Unloading these magazines a round or two will help the life of the spring. Rotating fully loaded magazines will also help the problem somewhat but it is not always practical."

Seeing as mag springs last a long time either way, it's a moot argument.
 
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