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There is much talk of holstering a glock or other striker fired gun without safety and the trigger getting caught on the holster or shirt or any number of other things. First thing I recommend is carry in a good IWB holster that doesn't collapse. Second one thing I was always taught in training is it only matters how fast you can draw from the holster, when reholstering in whatever type of holster take your time and make sure everything is clear. There have even been double action triggers that have got caught on something when someone is trying to reholster too quickly and caused an ND.

I have also seen at least 3 ND/AD with double action firearms.

Just my 2 cents

Thanks
mreeveshp
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
IMHO, recent strikers have shortened the take up to nearly non existent; safe in a holster; coming out of the holster under stress, I Don't know.
 

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To me it would be the same as carrying a double action revolver cocked a 1911 cocked, unlocked and grip safety defeated or my Beretta 96 cocked, the safety is always off on that one when carrying. My finger never goes on the trigger period on any of my guns period unless I'm ready to shoot. It's ingrained and would take a conscious effort to do that since that's how I trained myself from day one of owning guns. There are other variables that can cause the trigger to engage besides your finger.
I've had at least 3 hard bike crashes carrying a gun, I've dropped a gun several times, Ive heard of several instances of striker fired guns discharging while holstering and I seriously doubt that was because someone tried to holster with their finger on the trigger.
A striker fired gun is not going to go off when dropped. Most dropped guns go off because someone tried to catch it, and hits the trigger in the process. The Sig Sauer P320 was one that had a defect, allowing it to fire when dropped. It was recalled, and updated to fix the issue. I watched a test performed on other striker fired guns, including my EDC, a Kimber Solo, in which the person making the video hit the guns with a hammer to try to make the gun fire, hitting it harder than the force a gun would see if dropped. They didn't fire. None fired except the P320, that hadn't had the fix applied. I wish I could find the video.

My wife dropped my fully loaded Solo onto asphalt. It was in a hard saddlebag on my motorcycle, and I told her it was there after we parked. I had to disarm to go into a national park building. She forgot, and opened the bag, and pulled out the sweater it was wrapped in. I wasn't happy with her, but the gun didn't fire, and I used that incident as a demonstration to her that as long as you do not try to grab the gun, it won't fire.

If you take a look at the mechanism of a striker fired gun like Glock, or a S&W Shield, you will see it is basically impossible for it ti fire unless the trigger is pulled. As long as you keep the gun in good working order, it isn't going to go off when dropped.
 

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As someone who has worked in the safety industry, the idea of putting the safety, the thing that keeps a gun from going bang when you don't want it to, on the same lever that makes the gun go bang when you do want it to is flat out bad safety engineering. It's like putting the brake and the accelerator on the same pedal. Just MHO, but I don't like striker triggers and I never will. It's why Glock leg is a thing. It was definitely designed by someone named Murphy.
 

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As someone who has worked in the safety industry, the idea of putting the safety, the thing that keeps a gun from going bang when you don't want it to, on the same lever that makes the gun go bang when you do want it to is flat out bad safety engineering. It's like putting the brake and the accelerator on the same pedal. Just MHO, but I don't like striker triggers and I never will. It's why Glock leg is a thing. It was definitely designed by someone named Murphy.
I started in safety and ended up in HR and Risk Management. I tend to think like you do.

Cars have red lights in the back that are illuminated when the headlights are on. Step on the brake pedal and the red lights glow a little brighter to alert the speeding motorist behind you that you are slowing down or stopping. When multiple cars are braking intermittently on a busy urban freeway it is extremely difficult for the human eye to discern which vehicles ahead are braking and which are not. Why don’t cars just have green lights in the back when one has their foot on the accelerator and red when braking?

The NHTSB and Nat Safety Council did push to introduce lights in the center of vehicles, near the rear window years ago but determined it would be too costly and difficult globally to revamp the colors of the lights to improve their signal value.
 

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Anyone who considers the Glock safety trigger as a genuine safety deserves to get Glock leg. It is no more than a pre-trigger.
 

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I started in safety and ended up in HR and Risk Management. I tend to think like you do.

Cars have red lights in the back that are illuminated when the headlights are on. Step on the brake pedal and the red lights glow a little brighter to alert the speeding motorist behind you that you are slowing down or stopping. When multiple cars are braking intermittently on a busy urban freeway it is extremely difficult for the human eye to discern which vehicles ahead are braking and which are not. Why don’t cars just have green lights in the back when one has their foot on the accelerator and red when braking?

The NHTSB and Nat Safety Council did push to introduce lights in the center of vehicles, near the rear window years ago but determined it would be too costly and difficult globally to revamp the colors of the lights to improve their signal value.
They should have done what a lot of motorcycle manufacturers have done, which is put a flasher circuit in. Regular red means no brakes. If the brakes are applied, the red lights not only get brighter, but they flash quickly for five seconds. I retrofitted my older motorcycle with that. It is a simple upgrade, just a cheap little module inserted in the existing wiring.
 

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No. Safety is the operator's responsibility!
 
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I consider striker fired guns as safe as any other gun, if the gun in question has a manual safety. Otherwise, depending on trigger pull, it's very much like carrying a 1911 cocked and UNLOCKED.
 

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A striker fired gun is not going to go off when dropped. Most dropped guns go off because someone tried to catch it, and hits the trigger in the process. The Sig Sauer P320 was one that had a defect, allowing it to fire when dropped. It was recalled, and updated to fix the issue. I watched a test performed on other striker fired guns, including my EDC, a Kimber Solo, in which the person making the video hit the guns with a hammer to try to make the gun fire, hitting it harder than the force a gun would see if dropped. They didn't fire. None fired except the P320, that hadn't had the fix applied. I wish I could find the video.

My wife dropped my fully loaded Solo onto asphalt. It was in a hard saddlebag on my motorcycle, and I told her it was there after we parked. I had to disarm to go into a national park building. She forgot, and opened the bag, and pulled out the sweater it was wrapped in. I wasn't happy with her, but the gun didn't fire, and I used that incident as a demonstration to her that as long as you do not try to grab the gun, it won't fire.

If you take a look at the mechanism of a striker fired gun like Glock, or a S&W Shield, you will see it is basically impossible for it ti fire unless the trigger is pulled. As long as you keep the gun in good working order, it isn't going to go off when dropped.
It's not the impact of falling that concerns me, it's the trigger catching a stick or rock or other object, which, when I drop one for whatever reason, will happen.
 

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It's not the impact of falling that concerns me, it's the trigger catching a stick or rock or other object, which, when I drop one for whatever reason, will happen.
Don't be a clutz?
 

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All else being equal, I would rather that a striker not be fully-cocked, when the trigger is at rest. This is a reason that I would rather use a Glock, than some other striker-fired pistols. The running or cycling of a Glock’s slide does not fully cock the striker. If a striker is fully-cocked, I know that the weapon is closer to a potential inertia-fire situation, as we all saw occur with the SIG P320.

By the way, the “safety lever” on the Glock trigger, as I see it, helps prevent inertia-firing. I do not see it as being equivalent to a true safety lever. With the Glock striker not being fully-cocked, when the trigger is at rest, the trigger safety is redundant, but redundant in a good way, IMHO.

Long-stroke DA, with a hammer, does give me an extra margin of safety, in some situations. One such situation is re-holstering, while having to keep my eyes on a potential threat, a task I did quite often, while policin’ a big city. My thumb can “ride” the back of the de-cocked hammer, to make sure the hammer is staying down, during re-holstering.

Hammer-fired pistols that allow Condition One carry, such as the 1911, allow me to re-holster while my thumb impinges directly on the hammer’s potential travel path.

Notice that I have said good things about three different firing mechanisms. I have, at various times, been trained-up with each of these. Ultimately, regardless of the firing mechanism, I really need to practice trigger finger discipline, and also make certain that the trigger is kept away from other things that might press against, or snag, the trigger.

In these panic-demic times, when training is curtailed, I find myself carrying DA revolvers, but not primarily because of safety concerns, but because my DA revolver trigger skills are less-perishable, compared to my auto-pistol trigger skills.
 

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The Gadget (Striker Control Device) addresses the concern about the trigger catching something while holstering. It works great. When not being used, it does nothing. So no need to remember to swipe the safety off in order to fire.

The Glock trigger dingus is to prevent the trigger's inertia from firing the pistol if it's dropped on its butt, which is the exact issue that plagued early Sig P320s. Sig's fix was to lighten (which also weakens) the trigger in order to appease the "I don't like Glock triggers" crowd. The dingus can also help if something catches the edge of the trigger, but that's not its main purpose.

If the trigger is too light for your tastes, you can simply install the parts to make the trigger heavier. Easy.
 
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Anyone avoid striker carry for this reason?
That is one of the reasons why I won't own such a pistol. Another reason is due it being made from soulless plastic. Steel and wood pistols are old-school, and the only way I roll.
 

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I am going against the grain with this one, but I don't like the "safe trigger" in modern striker firearms. I see no reason t justify my position, I just don't like them.
 

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If you carry a striker fired pistol, as I do, I recommend you remove any draw strings often found inside heavy coats. They seem to have caused a lot of discharges and I doubt many of us ever use the draw string to prevent wind coming in from bottom of coat.

 

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The Gadget (Striker Control Device) addresses the concern about the trigger catching something while holstering. It works great. When not being used, it does nothing. So no need to remember to swipe the safety off in order to fire.

The Glock trigger dingus is to prevent the trigger's inertia from firing the pistol if it's dropped on its butt, which is the exact issue that plagued early Sig P320s. Sig's fix was to lighten (which also weakens) the trigger in order to appease the "I don't like Glock triggers" crowd. The dingus can also help if something catches the edge of the trigger, but that's not its main purpose.

If the trigger is too light for your tastes, you can simply install the parts to make the trigger heavier. Easy.
You really gotta stop with the technical terms, like "dingus." We aren't all engineers here!
 

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As someone who has worked in the safety industry, the idea of putting the safety, the thing that keeps a gun from going bang when you don't want it to, on the same lever that makes the gun go bang when you do want it to is flat out bad safety engineering. It's like putting the brake and the accelerator on the same pedal. Just MHO, but I don't like striker triggers and I never will. It's why Glock leg is a thing. It was definitely designed by someone named Murphy.
JMF552, I don't understand. Are you referring to the trigger safety? It's only a safety in the sense that it precludes inertia travel from a drop. Given that Glock wanted its guns to not have a manual safety, it's a necessary safety device.

It's late, and I'm a bit more dense than normal at this hour, so perhaps I missed your point.
 

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The Gadget (Striker Control Device) addresses the concern about the trigger catching something while holstering. It works great. When not being used, it does nothing. So no need to remember to swipe the safety off in order to fire.
...
I've always thought the gadget is an ingenious device.

Had Glock invented it, no doubt people would sing its praises for its simplicity.

However, a third party invented it, and thus it is derided as a complicated solution to the relatively minor problem of people shooting themselves.
 
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