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I consider striker fired guns as safe as any other gun, if the gun in question has a manual safety. Otherwise, depending on trigger pull, it's very much like carrying a 1911 cocked and UNLOCKED.
Which no one in their right mind does.
 

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Which no one in their right mind does.
Let's think about this. Full disclosure, I carry cocked AND locked.

A striker fired gun has a trigger safety that prevents trigger travel from a drop, and, in some designs, precludes travel if the trigger is depressed from the side.

The 1911 has a grip safety the will prevent trigger travel if the grip safety is not depressed.

Both have sears.

Strikers have firing pin blocks.

Series 80 have firing pin blocks. Others have the Schwartz safety. Series 70 do not have firing pin blocks.

Some striker fired guns have manual safeties (e.g., shield) that many people admittedly do not use.

So I can see the argument that a 1911 equipped with a firing pin block carried cocked and unlocked may be just as safe as a striker fired gun. After all, once inserted into the holster, the trigger on a 1911 cannot be pulled. Thus, absent a catastrophic sear failure coupled with a failure of half notch AND a failure of the firing pin block (if the gun is equipped with the latter), the 1911will not fire. (Note that the manual safety of a 1911 will NOT stop the gun from firing if the sear "breaks" (but I've never heard of a 1911 sear simply failing like this)).

It then comes down to the user, does it not?
 

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comparing a 1911 to say a glock........this is my takeaway.....

most standard Govt issue 1911's have an out of the box trigger of around 5 pounds.....
the std glock has a trigger of around 5 pounds. So trigger pull weight is roughly the same.

the difference is with the 1911 that 5 pound pull is the glass rod break and short......while the glock 5 pound pull is the rotten plum squish of fighting thru resistance and some distance....

that "squish" and slightly more trigger travel with resistance makes the difference in my mind of carrying a 1911 cocked and unlocked vs carrying a glock.

i simply would not carry a 1911 unlocked.......
 

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Yes, exactly, no one in their right mind would carry a 1911 (and yes, I forgot to specify Series 80) cocked and unlocked. But the same people may think nothing of carrying a Glock, which doesn't even have the option of locking. And from a standpoint of firing the gun, how much difference is there really in firing a rack grade 1911 and a stock Glock. Which goes to the next point...

Which no one in their right mind does.
I think you're being a bit melodramatic on how difficult the trigger pull is on a Glock. There a very light take up against the trigger return and safety plunger springs (maybe a pound or two total), and then five-ish pounds of staple gun break at the wall. Does that little bit of soft take up add much in the way of safety? I really don't think so. And if you'd like, I can post a video of a G43 going off in someone's holster with the carrier's hands no where near the gun.

comparing a 1911 to say a glock........this is my takeaway.....

most standard Govt issue 1911's have an out of the box trigger of around 5 pounds.....
the std glock has a trigger of around 5 pounds. So trigger pull weight is roughly the same.

the difference is with the 1911 that 5 pound pull is the glass rod break and short......while the glock 5 pound pull is the rotten plum squish of fighting thru resistance and some distance....

that "squish" and slightly more trigger travel with resistance makes the difference in my mind of carrying a 1911 cocked and unlocked vs carrying a glock.

i simply would not carry a 1911 unlocked.......
 

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did not say the trigger pull was difficult.......just that it is a totally different feel and more travel distance. The glock trigger to me does not "break"....its more like rolling over a speed bump.
 

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did not say the trigger pull was difficult.......just that it is a totally different feel and more travel distance. The glock trigger to me does not "break"....its more like rolling over a speed bump.
That's because it is not "cocked." You're compressing the striker spring. It's not good or bad, just different.
 

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Just an aside on the Glock trigger ……. When I had Glocks (yes, past tense), I used a staple gun for dry fire practice. Saved me from having the rack the slide to reset the trigger…..😎
 

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I carry revolvers, 1911s, and DA/SA. I have carried plastic striker fired guns before but I didn't really like them. I am not concerned myself about the trigger. I'm concerned with other people around me carrying striker fired pistols without a safety. For me its kind of like driving. I drive safely but I can't count on those around me to do the same.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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I'd like to see statistics that indicate what gun was involved in an accidental shooting or when a child gets ahold of a gun. I tend to believe that most are from trigger safety striker fired guns. Most gun owners that learn to know their guns are safe with them no matter what. But when an idiot picks one up, LOOK OUT!
 

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If you carry a striker fired pistol, as I do, I recommend you remove any draw strings often found inside heavy coats. They seem to have caused a lot of discharges and I doubt many of us ever use the draw string to prevent wind coming in from bottom of coat.

I recommend paying attention to what you are doing while re-holstering, go slow, and using a good holster that fully covers the trigger, and one that it rigid, that will not collapse.
 

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Over the past 35+ years, my wife and I have personally seen some NDs. Here is the list:

1. ND with a Colt 1911 Govt Model - single action type (round fired into ground)

2. ND with a SIG P220 - DA/SA action type (round fired into leg of shooter trying to re-holster his duty weapon)

3. ND with a Bersa .380 - DA/SA action type (round fired into ground down range while trying to "decock" the pistol)

4. ND with a Glock 19 - striker fired (Witnessed by my wife - round fired down range)

5. ND with a Walther PPK/s - DA/SA action type (gun store employee fired round across the room and struck another employee in the "love handle", employee was putting away guns from the counter)

6. ND with a SIG P226 - DA/SA action type (round fired into ground down range while shooter was trying to "unload and show clear")

I not a believer that one action type is "safer" than another, I am a believer that one must be safety conscious at ALL TIMES with his/her firearm and never take them for granted or get complacent.
 

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3. ND with a Bersa .380 - DA/SA action type (round fired into ground down range while trying to "decock" the pistol)
Did the Bersa not have a decocking lever? If so, was it used or did it fail?

On a side note, it sounds like all of these instances occurred because a finger was on the trigger when it shouldn't have been. Also, a lot of LEOs don't handle their weapons properly. Short story, in one instance I asked a Sheriff Deputy what weapon he was carrying. He said as he drew the weapon, "Well I don't know!"
 

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Did the Bersa not have a decocking lever? If so, was it used or did it fail?
It did, he didn't use it.
Only one instance was the ND "performed" by a LEO, other instances all shooters with some training and experience. Not that it really matters.

Like I stated "One must be safety conscious at ALL TIMES with his/her firearm and never take them for granted or get complacent."
 

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be as it may.....some trigger systems are a bit less tolerable towards negligence....
its a training issue that covers really all trigger/action types.....

one can easily make a case for training......it falls on deaf ears or some forget probably 90 percent of the time.

its like following the instruction manual for a car, lawn mower, shampoo bottle.....rarely exactly followed if even read, there is some back-sliding, a cheat or short-cut here and there.....and finally, ignoring the instructions and procedures as you "know what you are doing".......
 

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be as it may.....some trigger systems are a bit less tolerable towards negligence....
its a training issue that covers really all trigger/action types.....

one can easily make a case for training......it falls on deaf ears or some forget probably 90 percent of the time.

its like following the instruction manual for a car, lawn mower, shampoo bottle.....rarely exactly followed if even read, there is some back-sliding, a cheat or short-cut here and there.....and finally, ignoring the instructions and procedures as you "know what you are doing".......
It doesn't take a whole lot of training to learn to not put your finger on the trigger until you are going to shoot, and always point the gun in a safe direction.
 

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Glock 19 . . . Resistance is futile.
 
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It doesn't take a whole lot of training to learn to not put your finger on the trigger until you are going to shoot, and always point the gun in a safe direction.
yet......the simplest and most logical basic rules are often the most violated rules....and continue to be violated for decades......it happens to the trained and licensed CC, the leos, the military, the hunters, the competition shooters, people that have been using guns practically all their lives,,,,,,etc, etc.....

the human factor....

if you offer the training for free.....the majority would probably not attend.
mandate training and basic handgun safety....it will be resisted/resented as govt intrusion.
If they take the course....that is not a guarantee of safety...but hopeful thinking
add stress......all bets are off
 

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So I can see the argument that a 1911 equipped with a firing pin block carried cocked and unlocked may be just as UNsafe as a striker fired gun.
FIFY
 
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I think you're being a bit melodramatic on how difficult the trigger pull is on a Glock. There a very light take up against the trigger return and safety plunger springs (maybe a pound or two total), and then five-ish pounds of staple gun break at the wall. Does that little bit of soft take up add much in the way of safety? I really don't think so. And if you'd like, I can post a video of a G43 going off in someone's holster with the carrier's hands no where near the gun.
It helps when people read for understanding. My reply had nothing to do w/ the Glockomatic, and everything to do w/ carrying a 1911 in Condition-0.
 

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The melodramatic line was in response to Retired Deputy's post. I multiquoted. Look above to my reply to your post.

It helps when people read for understanding. My reply had nothing to do w/ the Glockomatic, and everything to do w/ carrying a 1911 in Condition-0.
 
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