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Discussion Starter #1
So I was doing some tap rack drills with snap caps with my Beretta M9 the other day. I discovered something I don't like about the safety, and need some suggestions.

In a couple of ways I tried gripping the slide, while the gun was still up at eye level, I found that doing it fast often results in knocking the safety on, pulling the trigger, and taking a moment to realize why nothing happened.

This mostly occurs when in double action. When the decocker tries to lower the hammer from single action there is usually enough resistance that this doesn't happen. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to grip the slide so as not to turn the safety on, or do I just need to practice doing it carefully in such a way as to not bump it?
 

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So I was doing some tap rack drills with snap caps with my Beretta M9 the other day. I discovered something I don't like about the safety, and need some suggestions.

In a couple of ways I tried gripping the slide, while the gun was still up at eye level, I found that doing it fast often results in knocking the safety on, pulling the trigger, and taking a moment to realize why nothing happened.

This mostly occurs when in double action. When the decocker tries to lower the hammer from single action there is usually enough resistance that this doesn't happen. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to grip the slide so as not to turn the safety on, or do I just need to practice doing it carefully in such a way as to not bump it?
This is a very common problem with guns with this type of safety/decocker.
Some suggest sliding your hand upward after doing the rack but I would suggest another model, such as a Glock.
 

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It's mostly a practice/muscle memory thing. Do it 50 times a day for 30 days straight and you won't have any problems anymore. I'm not really exaggerating or kidding. Ran into the same problems when I qual'd with the Beretta in the Corps. Wasn't real fond of it at first, but it can get the job done. Just keep working on it. I always run my thumb over the lever before firing just to ensure it's in the right place. If you make it a part of your mental nano-second checklist each time you rack the slide you won't have any problems.

Good luck.
 

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My 4506 has a similar safety only larger and as hardcorps79 said it comes with practice. The M9 is a great pistol.
 

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Doing it in the Corps, I would tilt the pistol to the left, grab the slide underhand with my left hand and sort of pull back and upward so it keeps the safety off. I also don't like the safety on the M9. I noticed whenever I pull it out of the holster, it comes off automatically from the back and up motion. It's kind of cool I guess for the range cause you don't have to flip the safety off yourself, but really the safety should always be done by the operator, not by the holster.
 

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Ran into the same problems when I qual'd with the Beretta in the Corps.
Huh......I've never had that problem with my issue M9. That's a new one.

I always run my thumb over the lever before firing just to ensure it's in the right place. If you make it a part of your mental nano-second checklist each time you rack the slide you won't have any problems.
Outstanding advice!
 

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I also have to teach the M-9 to my young soldiers at Ft. Huachuca. I make them include an automatic feel of the safety. Wit gloves on it is way to easy to push it to on.
 

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Take it to an Armorer and see if you can get the Safety Switched to a Decocker Model only. This should solve the problem. Even if you engage that lever it will decock the pistol only and you'll still be up and running. Granted you no longer will be able to to carry the gun safety on; however, many folks don't carry a beretta with the safety on in the first place it cuts out that extra unnatural motion of the clicking the safety "OFF" on a slide mounted safety gun.

Option number #2 buy another gun.

Actually I did some research you might not be able to switch the 92F/S to the 92 G. I thought you would be able to but I guess not. Call Beretta and see if it is option.
 

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I like the tilt to the side method. I would actually try and grip the saftey/decocker with my thumb and crook of my index finger and make a point to keep it in the upward position. This can still be done at eye level.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the suggestions guys. I'll try the tilt method, and add checking the safety to my training routine.
 

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Try racking it with the weapon pointing straight down range, finger off the trigger then use the supporting hand by grasping over the serrated (rear) of the slide so that your four fingers are over one side and safety and with the palm on the other side. With equal pressure and a forward punch with the shooting hand or rear pull of the supporting hand or both at the same time. This works for me with my M-9. My department has Glocks and along with the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council they recommend and practice this method. When I first qualified in the USMC 1974-1984 I was taught this method by an old time Marine infantryman from 1944-1975 who was well versed in handgun usage.
 

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I agree with Spec. Practice, practice and more practice and when your done do it again. Your goal is muscle memorization. So many times during qualifications when shooting and reloading you can hear the training officer yelling at the other shooters to reload or clear the weapon.

This should be instinctual at this point. Bang, bang, bang, click, tap, rack and bang. If you have a jam cover and concealment, drop mag, clear, load mag, release slide, tap and bang. Simple when you practice. Good luck.
 
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