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Discussion Starter #1
I keep reading about the 4 golden rules of gun safety, however most don't define them. I guess you are just supposed to know. I've been shooting/hunting for 30 some odd years and never had a negligent discharge. Here is what I was taught by my father and grandfather, let's see what you guys think.

- A firearm is loaded until you confirm otherwise.
- Never point at something you don't intend to dispatch.
- Always keep safety on/ finger off trigger until you are ready to fire.
- Be aware of what is behind your target.

Is there something I missed? Have I been doing it wrong all these years?
 

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I keep reading about the 4 golden rules of gun safety, however most don't define them. I guess you are just supposed to know. I've been shooting/hunting for 30 some odd years and never had a negligent discharge. Here is what I was taught by my father and grandfather, let's see what you guys think.

- A firearm is loaded until you confirm otherwise.
- Never point at something you don't intend to dispatch.
- Always keep safety on/ finger off trigger until you are ready to fire.
- Be aware of what is behind your target.

Is there something I missed? Have I been doing it wrong all these years?
I only disagree with you on one point, a firearm is loaded period.

Something I read from Kathy Jackson (Corned Cat) about firearm safety was you treat all firearms as loaded no matter what. There are no two different ways to handle a gun based on whether or not it's loaded you treat them all like they're loaded. If I can find the article I'll post the link.

Rule One:*“All guns are always loaded. (Treat them so!)”

This rule means that we must always treat every firearm with the same respect we would give a loaded weapon.

When we follow Rule One, even after we have just checked to see that the gun is unloaded, we still never do anything with it that we would not do with a loaded gun.

This is the cardinal rule, and all other safety rules follow naturally from it. At its heart, Rule One means that the other safety rules will always apply. It means we carefully protect our good habits, and never excuse our bad ones.

Some people apparently believe that merely checking to see the gun is unloaded means they can then treat it like a toy — that they can point it at their friends to pose for a picture, or at their training partners for disarming practice, or at a flimsy interior wall for dryfire, or at their own left hands to check trigger function. That’s a foolish, foolish idea that kills a certain number of people every single year.
The Four Rules | Cornered Cat
 

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Roped guns are great stress inocculators when used during force-on-force training.
 
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I've been shooting for over 50 years, including in the military, I completely get the four rules, I follow them, etc. But there are logical inconsistencies.
1. "Always treat every gun as if it were loaded." OK, then you can't field strip it, clean it or dry fire it. If it is loaded, you should not be doing any of those things.
2. "Never point a gun at anything to don't intend to destroy." Do you want to destroy your holster? The wall of your house? The inside of your safe? And again, no dry firing. The muzzle is always pointing somewhere.
3. "Always keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to fire." Again, that means no dry firing and you can never field strip a Glock.
4. "Be aware of what is behind your target." If you are target shooting, fine. If someone is firing at you, you might be able to make a partial assessment of that, but maybe not. No way you are going to be able to make a full assessment of everywhere a round could go in a stress situation.

In other words, no one here who actually carries and shoots always follows the rules of gun safety!

These rules are like the checklists we had in Naval Aviation. Each of them had a context where they were valid and other contexts where they were not. They don't work unless there is a thinking, reasoning brain directing them. They are memory joggers. I would like to see them called "Safety Checklists" instead of rules.

I am reminded of the following cartoon. This guy was just following instructions, aka "The Rules!"

Picture1.jpg
 

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I have added one. It might be a combination of the above. When ever I pick up a firearm, I will do one of two things first - Shoot it or make it safe. And by making it safe, I empty, clear, etc.
 

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Roped guns are great stress inocculators when used during force-on-force training.
Okay, I'll bite. What is a "roped gun"? Yippee kay yay?
 

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I agree with your 4 points including treating a gun as loaded until you have confirmation that it is unloaded. I think considering gun to be unloaded all the time is a bit too scrupulous. That premise does not take into consideration that some guns are unloaded. An unloaded gun cannot fire a round that is not there. I think it is prescribe that one should consider every gun to be loaded until a physical examination of the gun azures that it is unloaded. So I think clarity should portray the fact that some guns are unloaded, but checking that is critical to safety. It is a bit of semantics, but a precisely stated rule is always best.
 
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Okay, I'll bite. What is a "roped gun"? Yippee kay yay?
It works for semi-autos of all types. Drop the mag, lock the slide to the rear and run a length of rope or weedwhacker string through the barrel and magazine well with the ends protruding from both. The gun is rendered physically and visually safe, and can be used for force-on-force training.

Anyone who has ever gone through a handgun class at Tactical Defense Institute is very familiar with the technique.
 

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It works for semi-autos of all types. Drop the mag, lock the slide to the rear and run a length of rope or weedwhacker string through the barrel and magazine well with the ends protruding from both. The gun is rendered physically and visually safe, and can be used for force-on-force training.

Anyone who has ever gone through a handgun class at Tactical Defense Institute is very familiar with the technique.
Okay, now I understand. Just never heard it referred to in that manner. When we first started training, our instructor had us use yellow plastic barrels from 5.11 that rendered the firearm inoperable. We also used blue (plastic) guns.
 
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It works for semi-autos of all types. Drop the mag, lock the slide to the rear and run a length of rope or weedwhacker string through the barrel and magazine well with the ends protruding from both. The gun is rendered physically and visually safe, and can be used for force-on-force training.

Anyone who has ever gone through a handgun class at Tactical Defense Institute is very familiar with the technique.
And the rest of us are not. We have a number of members that like to throw out "terms" that to them may be simple and easy to understand/decipher but not so much for the rest of us. Please stop and remember that the Majority of us on here may not have your level of training/experience/expertise.
 

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And the rest of us are not. We have a number of members that like to throw out "terms" that to them may be simple and easy to understand/decipher but not so much for the rest of us. Please stop and remember that the Majority of us on here may not have your level of training/experience/expertise.
I'm always glad to provide additional explanation.
 

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The Four Universal Safety Rules (as used by my former PD and my training company)
1. All guns are always considered loaded.
2. Never point the muzzle at anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on target & you intend to shoot.
4. Be sure of your target, backstop and background beyond.
 

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I'm always glad to provide additional explanation.
Sometimes ad nauseum...:rolleyes::embarassed:

Sorry Mike, sometimes I cannot resist urges. No explanation needed.

Rules are made to be broken. Sometimes the results are self explanatory.
 
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<snip> Please stop and remember that the Majority of us on here may not have your level of training/experience/expertise.
I say to your, love your enemies, do good to them which hate you. Bless them that curse you and pray for them which despitefully use you. :yup:
 

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Sometimes ad nauseum...:rolleyes::embarassed:

Sorry Mike, sometimes I cannot resist urges. No explanation needed.

Rules are made to be broken. Sometimes the results are self explanatory.
"I'm not arrogant, I'm pedantic. Here, let me explain the difference."
 
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One of the more memorable safety lessons I witnessed at Parris Island. When you came off the firing line the Rifle (M14 @ the time)the bolt was to be locked open. Should the bolt not be open the recruit was told to stand at semi- port arms and open the bolt with their nose. Painful lesson!!!!!. From what I witnessed no one but no one accomplished opening the bolt in that manner.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Sounds like I have my bases covered and mist of you folks roughly agree. I would disagree with some of you that say always treat a gun like it is loaded, otherwise I would have some dirty, broken guns. I agree with the premise behind it, but that is why we have the rule about not pointing at something you don't want to destroy. Plus I like to think I'm not a complete moron, and I feel common sense plays a huge role in gun safety as well.

Thanks for the feedback ladies and gents.
 
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