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Back when dinosaurs roamed The Plain, and I learned to shoot sidearms, I was taught to use a thumbs-down or "revolver style" grip, where the thumb of the support hand is placed over the thumb of the shooting hand.

To me, this technique has several important advantages over the high-thumbs grip that seems to be de rigour nowadays:

First, it is the same grip whether you shoot auto loaders or revolvers. Try to use a high-thumb grip with a revolver, and you can injure your support thumb via gases and debris escaping from the cylinder gap.

Second, how many times do we see shooters having function issues, where one of the suggestions is "make sure your thumb isn't hitting the slide release lever?" or "make sure your thumb isn't dragging the slide?" How about removing the possibility of that happening at all under stress, and tuck the darn thumbs away in the first place?

And finally, with some of the smaller conceal carry guns out there, a high-thumb grip places the support thumb danger close to the muzzle. If things get dicey, bad things can happen to that thumb.

I fully understand that the high-thumb grip is supposed to put more hand meat on the gun, and it does. However, I'm not at all convinced that whatever control is gained is worth the potential risks.

Does anyone else here use the thumbs-down grip? Or am I the only dinosaur left out there? :embarassed:
 

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I call it crossed thumbs but I'm certain we are talking about the same thing. I don't like semi-auto unless they are pocket sized. I came to the realization earlier today that I avoid service size semi-auto because I can't cross thumb them the same as I can a revolver.
 

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I use to forward thumbs when I was drawing and shooting very quickly for defensive practice, but I am starting to just use one hand for that style of shooting.

I will always cross my thumbs get a nice secure and steady grip if I'm hunting or target shootingwhere I have some time.
 
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I'm and old-school thumbs-down guy. It annoys me when instructors insist that their way is the only right way. It's like the argument about using the pad of your finger on the trigger versus the first knuckle, or halfway in between. It depends on the shooter and the gun.

I had an instructor for a few classes, who was otherwise pretty good, but he was a big high-thumbs guy. He kept saying, "I could get all you guys to shoot better instantly if I cut your thumbs off, but then then your reloads would be too slow!"
 

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I shoot high thumb with both auto and revolver, have for years. The is nothing new, nor modern, nor de rigueur about shooting high thumbs with autos or revolvers. Now, before you call me a liar, checkout the book "Shooting" by John ("Fitz") FitzGerald first published in 1930, plenty of pictures of shooters shooting high thumb with both platforms.
 

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I've used the thumbs down/crossed thumbs grip for two handed shooting. I've tried both but the high thumb never felt "natural" for me with a semi-auto (maybe I gave up too early, read a lot of positives about high thumb but it didn't feel right for me). Never tried high thumb with a revolver, though, for the reasons you stated - I like my thumb tip.
 

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I am with the OP. I was shooting revolvers in 1972 and taught the same grip. It has served me well, even in competition. Plus my fingers are too short to do a thumbs high grip. I like my grip with the thumbs overlapping. I never have to worry about the slide dragging on my finger or my thumb hitting the slide release. It also allows me to put more pressure on the left side of the gun to prevent trigger pull from pushing it to the left. I learned a long time ago when teaching people how to shoot, if something works well for them, don't force them to go by the book which we old timers know changes over time. I laugh when I recall some of the things I was taught by "experts" that are now considered bad.
 

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I've used the thumbs down/crossed thumbs grip for two handed shooting. I've tried both but the thumbs high never felt "natural" for me with a semi-auto (maybe I gave up to early, read a lot of positives about thumb hight but it didn't feel right for me). Never tried thumb high with a revolver, though, for the reasons you stated - I like my thumb tip.
Nothing is going to happen to your thumb tip, if you're doing it correctly. The shooting hand thumb is high, nothing comes out of the rear of the cylinder.

I think you and 10th are confusing high thumb with two handed shooting with the off side thumb held high, not how it's done.

The point is, shoot whichever way is best for you, there is no "one way only", except for streets. :wink:
 

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I shoot high thumb with both auto and revolver, have for years. The is nothing new, nor modern, nor de rigueur about shooting high thumbs with autos or revolvers. Now, before you call me a liar, checkout the book "Shooting" by John ("Fitz") FitzGerald first published in 1930, plenty of pictures of shooters shooting high thumb with both platforms.
He didn't like trigger guards either:)
 

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Nothing is going to happen to your thumb tip, if you're doing it correctly. The shooting hand thumb is high, nothing comes out of the rear of the cylinder.

I think you and 10th are confusing high thumb with two handed shooting with the off side thumb held high, not how it's done.

The point is, shoot whichever way is best for you, there is no "one way only", except for streets. :wink:
Do you mean the support hand thumb resting against the recoil shield? If that is the case, that would seem completely safe, and yes, I used the term incorrectly.
 
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I never shot thumbs High until I started messing with the 1911, and then it just seemed like the natural thing to do, starting with the draw stroke, to safety off.

I always shot thumbs forward, unless I was target shooting, then crossed fingers.

Funny how a platform your hold.
 
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I run parallel down-frame thumbs on most autoloaders. I run cross-tucked thumbs on revolvers. I've also experimented with crossing my eyes, but I ...wouldn't recommend that. :blink:
 
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I like the thumbs-forward variant because I can use the forward thumb to point in as I extend to final position. That helps me get a good line-up on the target.

I do keep thumbs-forward on the very small bit of revolver shooting I do, mostly for consistency.
 

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I'm and old-school thumbs-down guy. It annoys me when instructors insist that their way is the only right way. It's like the argument about using the pad of your finger on the trigger versus the first knuckle, or halfway in between. It depends on the shooter and the gun.

I had an instructor for a few classes, who was otherwise pretty good, but he was a big high-thumbs guy. He kept saying, "I could get all you guys to shoot better instantly if I cut your thumbs off, but then then your reloads would be too slow!"
No grip is perfect nor works for everyone. I prefer a thumbs high/forward when shooting my semi autos.

But I remember reading an article that advised to give preference to the high/forward thumbs grip when shooting, but to allow other methods like the thumbs crossed etc for people who have smaller or weaker hands like some women, the elderly. Extending their grip doesn't always make the pistol more "secure" for those with small or weaker hands and they lose some of their ability to control the recoil.

As long as you don't turn it to the side gangsta style or go teacup grip I'm ok with whatever works for each shooter.
 
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I prefer the thumbs down, support thumb exerting pressure on the strong hand thumbnail. Take the support hand away for one handed, same grip with strong hand. I've visited with/worked with the flagged and high thumbs two handed grips over the years. I remain thumbs locked down two handed, thumb locked down one handed.

In training others, I don't suggest anyone change their grip unless they're having difficulty with what they're presently using. If you're getting the results with YOUR grip that you want, why change anything?

Relative the age of flagged/thumbs forward two handed hold? As OD mentioned, there's documentation in the 40's in one of Fairbairn's books as well, that illustrates the grip with a 1911 held that way. Nothing really new to the world of shooting.
 

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Add me to that list with Brownie and Matthew. I'm a lefty anyway!
 
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