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I have come to terms with, and made the decision that because I have chosen to carry I WILL risk taking a life, if it is down to the wire and ''him or me''. No two ways about it. I WILL survive, whatever it takes ... this is ''mindset''.

The aspect I do wonder about tho is - just how well or badly I might handle any aftermath ... legal aspects aside.

I covet and respect life - it is sacred in all normal circles - but when and if an individual decides they might want to play fast and loose with MY life then all bets are off. This is most of us I reckon.

But - same as mil' folks can suffer PTSD - I wonder about managing after the event - something I do not expect to have to deal with at all but - not unusual perhaps for us to contemplate such.

I know for instance how I have vivid mental pictures - videos even - of things like seeing my deceased Mom or Pop - they are indelibly engraved on my mind. I therefore would expect to relive countless times the moment when MY bullets are taking down a BG - however bad he may have been. This would not be regret, assuming it was totally justified - just a ''haunting'' deal.

There is no answer to this and my post is actually inconsequential as a result. I am I guess just as usual rambling thru thought processes!!
 

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P95carry, this is a good subject that CCW'ers should contemplate. While it will not happen to most here, a few will experience it. My opinion is , better to have nightmares about action taken than about lost loved ones or losing your life.
 

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I guess ya dont know how it will go till it happens to you .. I cant say as ive never had it happen to me but i guess if worst comes to worst you could go see a head shrinker.

I would try to talk thinks overwith a friend or a Priest first if thats your way.. Again hard to say how anyone will react
 

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This rambling from one who has been there, done that.

1. Don't focus on the BG as a person, think of him as a target and your mind should be on placing your rounds.

2. Don't spend any time looking at or examining the BG once he is down. Secure his weapon and the scene, then look away from him and for God's sake don't stare into his face, look at it as little as possible. If you must notice something about him observe his manner of dress or color of clothing, not his face.

3. Remind yourself as often as necessary that you didn't make the decision to shoot, he made it for you.

4. Focus on keeping bystanders away from you and the BG, you don't want them muddying up the scene.

5. You are going to experience some post-stress psychological problems with taking a life no matter how necessary it was. Remind yourself of point #3 again.

I'm sure there are more suggestions that others may have, but this is my advice, just off the top of my head.
 

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better to have nightmares about action taken than about lost loved ones or losing your life.
Rocky - I'll agree on that - that's a four for sure good bud!!!

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Bob thx - just saw your post - good advice - #3 is THE one to keep in mind that's for sure.
 

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Excellent topic! Forewarned is forearmed.

This is covered by Massad Ayoob in LFI-I. In a nutshell, there are a number of things you may experience after a traumatic event such as a self-defense shooting. You may experience one, or more, or none. Every individual is different. For example, it is not unusual to experience difficulty sleeping for a period of time, but if you defend yourself and sleep like a baby that night, it doesn't necessarily mean there's anything "wrong" with you.

I don't have my copy of "In The Gravest Extreme" handy, but IIRC he also covers some of this in the book. It can be helpful, after experiencing a traumatic event, to be able to recognize certain "symptoms" and be able to say to yourself "This must be X" and "Now this is the Y" that can be expected. It can provide a feeling of stability in the period that follows an "event."

I would highly recommend doing a little research on post-trauma reactions, and how they should be addressed if necessary. It's good to have a plan for "psychological first aid" should you ever need it. As far as counseling, better to have some sooner, even if you don't need it, than let a problem go and have it get worse. Best to address any issues ASAP.

SSKC

Disclaimer: I'm not a mental health professional, but I have had some training in "Critical Incident Response," and, more importantly, I'm staying next door to a Holiday Inn Express tonight. :biggrin:
 

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I'm staying next door to a Holiday Inn Express tonight.
All is well then - :biggrin:
 

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Good thread to think about. Never has happened to me... yet (and hopefully never will).

The only experience that I can draw on is a guy here locally that had to fire in defense. He kept on calling up the CCW instructor (the same one that taught me) and going over and over the event trying to think of what could or should have been done differently.

The grand jury ruled it a good shoot (self defense). But man, you should have seen the letters in the paper from family members, here and across the US.

"he was a good man" (who was attacking his girlfriend when the guy intervined)

"they were only having an innocent fight (yeah, one or two smacks is just innocent), the guy should have stayed out of it".

"but the gun (which he had pointed at the self defense guy) was unloaded" :rolleyes:

etc...

I don't know how he is now, haven't seen or heard in a great long time.

Wayne
 
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