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Lets have a little structure going on here. Not everyone is familiar with levers, and though a simple picture might stir the emotions of a lever lover... lets give those not drinking the cool aid (yet) the 5 W's to feed their curiosity, and get them to see the light.


1. What: Manufacturer and Model
2. When: When was the rifle/Pistol made - when did you get it?

3. Picture! We always need a picture! Pictures.

4/5. Who and Where: This will preface "Why" - tell us who you are and where you live (mountains, flatland's?).

6. Why: Tell us why you got it. Tell us why you love or hate it. Sell it! What accessories did you put on the thing if any.


When I get home tonight, I'll do mine. I have no photos on the work computer.
 

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As of right now, I personally only own two lever guns. The Winchester 94 I've mentioned once in a while on the forum is and always will be my father's. Same goes for the Savage 99, which was my great-grandfather's.

I own two Henrys. A Big Boy Steel in .44 Rem Mag, and a Henry Golden Boy in .22LR. Both are 2016 Vintage.

101_0716.jpg

I live in Wisconsin and large game shots are usually within 150yds, least 'round my parts.

The Big Boy was a 30-30 I won at a raffle last year. I asked the donating gun shop owner if I could just swap calibers since I actually wanted the other gun on the board (a .44 Big Boy) so she obliged. Won it about a month before a hog hunting trip my dad was going on and I was invited, but wasn't quite sure if I wanted to fork over the money for it being a poor college student and all. Well, winning that lever was the sign I needed to go on the trip. Took a 300lb sow with it last October in Tennessee. If I get the chance to go deer hunting this year, I might carry it instead of my usual 7mm-08.

The Golden Boy was a gift to me from my father, who also has always wanted one. The gun will never see the woods, as it is too pretty. I'll pick up a blued model for that purpose. It plinks well at 50yds and is fun to try to ring drums out to 150yds with. I replaced the original lever with a big loop shortly after getting the gun, but I'm still not sure if I prefer it over the regular lever.

Edit: Oh, and I have a Uberti Yellowboy in .22LR I bought when I was young(er) thinking it'd be the same as a Golden Boy. Oh, how foolish I was. The gun could anchor a truck and it has a barn door spread at 50yds. Looks purdy when shined up (not shined very well in this old pic) and its only good for decoration.

100_1616 (2).jpg
 

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Marlin 39a 22lr lever. It's super accurate and not a scaled down lever gun. They've been made a very long time. Mine's a 1953 made.

Rossi 357 mag lever. Hardly any recoil, with the right loads, it duplictes 30-30 ballistics so it's good to 75-100 yrds on game, or standard 158 grainers for plinking/defensive work without looking like a black evil rifle.
 

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You're just disgusting Brownie, mentioning your Marlin lever-action .22 like that. I've wanted a 39A for quite a while. I'm envious. There have been a few Marlin 39s bopping around the gun shows I work for the past year or so. Been husbanding funds more since to retirement and some new-found additional pressures on income that could otherwise be frittered away on neato guns and so haven't "pulled the trigger" so to speak. That 39A represents a really good choice for any shooter. Would seem that a .22 rim fire lever-action should be a staple in a shooter's lever-action rifle battery.

Lever-action rifles are fun and useful. It's entertaining to putter around with them at the range. They are truly grand for plinking in the field. They are effective for a great many hunting chores, and one could make an argument that a good "high-capacity" lever-action is a reasonable substitute for the so-called "assault rifle."

I like 'em. Will have to post the ones here later.
 

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Here's my only lever gun. A marlin 336c 30-30. This pic is from the mid 1980s, my first deer taken at 150 yards. My Dad bought me this gun shortly before this pic. Still got it still take it into the woods some minus the scope.
 

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All Winchester '94 rifles. I live in the Willamette Valley of Oregon with the coast mountain range and the coast to the west. The Cascade mountains and high desert are to the east. Portland is to the North.

1969 Teddy Roosevelt Commemorative .30-30 with 26" octagon barrel. It was NIB when I bought it a couple of years ago. I cut the strap, took it to the range, and shot it.
Bought used .45 Colt with 20" barrel to go with my Colt SAA and Uberti Cattleman .45 Colt revolvers.
Bought used .44 magnum with 16.1" barrel to go with my Colt, Ruger, and S&W .44 magnum revolvers.

Winchesters (1024x754) (2017_01_22 17_26_42 UTC).jpg
 

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I only have one lever, a Marlin 336 in 30-30.

Have no idea when it was made but bought a few years ago at a gun show in Fayetteville.

Marlin.jpg

I live in eastern North Carolina (sand hills).

Didn't have a lever and had some empty space in the safe. I have since added a scope to it.
 

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LimaCharlie;

I think one of those long-barreled 94 commemorative rifles like yours would be the way to do .30-30 in the Winchester 94. Was always intrigued by the notion of the .30-30 from out of a 24-inch barrel. Might be ".300 Savage-ish" in performance, especially with a 150 grain bullet?

Many years ago I was given the task of "restoring" three Winchester commemorative rifles that had been stored by a friend of mine who went to live in England for a few years. They were left at his wife's parent's house. When he returned, water had gotten to them in some way and spoiled the surface finishes on the rifles. I was suppose to clean them up. There was little that I could do. One can't return steel to the rust pits.

They were still sound and bores were fine. I tried to talk him into selling me the NRA centennial commemorative because, of the three, it had the longer 24-inch barrel. I was going to make it into a shooter. He wouldn't budge, had bought them all as an investment, and seemed to want to stubbornly will them to still be valuable though ravaged by rust.
 

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Marlin 336W Package gun. Have had it about 6 years, mine is a pre Remlin model.

No pics, y'all know what it looks like. :smile:

Wanted a .30-something defensive rifle, max range I can see is 150 yards in my suburban area. Wanted the ability to get through cover better than can be done with 5.56, if it came to that.

Almost got a bolt action, but the lever was cheaper, and the mag tube can be topped off while the gun is still in battery.

Lever gun was priced right, well below a semi auto. I added a 10 round elastic butt cuff, otherwise bone stock. 10 plus 6 in the tube of .30-30 should get me through anything realistic.

Tactical stuff is all the rage, but lever guns are the original combat repeaters, and they can still do the job. The fact that they are now considered hunting and not combat guns is a bonus.
 

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I only have the one. It was a gift from my father. I really didnt have a need for it, but my dad wanted me to have a legacy firearm. It is a henry big boy 44 mag. Pictured with it, is my Ruger redhawk 44 mag....

magnums.jpg
 

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1/2) Top gun is a Winchester Model 94 30-30 from 1958
2nd is a Henry 22 carbine
3rd Marlin 1895 Guide Gun 45-70
Bottom Rossi 44 mag

3)
IMG_4238.jpg


4) Live on the East bank of the Rockies

5) Bought the Winchester off a friend, who bought it off a guy in the early 80s and let sit in his closet. I actually took it bear hunting with me the time I got the bear, but never got it out of the truck. The other guns have no value other than monetary.
 

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Here's a couple: these are just a few..(pardon the non-lever guns, already had the pictures for insurance)

Winchester 94 .30-30 1986 Parkerized, synthetic stock & scout scope (farm carry)
(Ruger Gunsite .308 2016 scout scope (hunting))

Marlin 1895 .45-70 2002 scout scope (hunting)
(Springfield SOCOM .308 2002 scout scope (defense))
(GSG .22 2006 (fun))

Winchester 94 .30WCF 1970 (collect)
Winchester 94 .30WCF 1947 (collect)
Henry .45LC 2005 (anniversary present from wife)
Sharps .45-70 1989 (first big bore gun)

(Spanish Mauser clone .308 1954 (collect))
(Winchester .22 1976 (gift from father))
Remington Nylon 76 'Trail Rider' .22 1962 (collect)- only lever gun by Remington...called the 'worlds fastest lever gun'.
 

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I've hunted in Texas all my life, hunting the state's rolling prairies and in the hill country.



Lever-Actions, top to bottom:

Winchester Model 1873 .38-40 (.38 WCF) rifle- This rifle is a more recent acquisition, purchased to replace a similar one I had early on in my adult shooting career and kept for some years, only to sell it off to fund another hobby. Mourned it endlessly so in 2016 I got another just like it only in better shooting condition. This rifle is from 1900 so is a later vintage Model 1873. I don't know why Winchester bothered with cranking out Model 1873s after the trim and much stronger designed Model 1892 rifle was brought out with one of its chamberings being the .38-40. My replacement Model 1873 has a better bore and tighter action than the first one ever did. No matter, the first one fired a jillion rounds of handloads at knot holes in trees, cactus, rocks, chased jackrabbits with hails of bullets, and took a whitetail buck (at 100 yards no less). This one hasn't done much more than prove that it shoots tight groups (for what it is) on paper and fuel some fall hunting dreams of taking a deer or hog at close range.

The .38-40 is a chambering of the Colt Single Action Army. One of those resides here that's near the same age as the rifle. The .38-40 is a cartridge that gives interchangeable fun between rifle and revolver.

Winchester Model 1886 .45-90- This rifle was produced in 1887. A design originating in the mind of John M. Browning. Have had it since the late 1980s perhaps. Was a gift to me by a kind friend of long ago. He had a story to go with it. Owned an ice plant in Cleburne, Texas and was known as the gun crank in town. During the depression, 1937 to be exact, a carpenter he'd not seen around town before wandered into the office of his ice plant one afternoon bearing this rifle. Man said he'd heard that my friend was a gun nut and might buy the rifle. Said he had done a carpentry job down on South Anglin Street for a widow lady, finding this rifle in the attic while working. She hadn't known the rifle was up there and really didn't have the money to pay the entire bill so ask him if he'd take the rifle as part payment. He really needed funds more than he did an old rifle so sold it to my friend for $13.00. My friend saw it as a project. The original fore end was split so he wrote Winchester, ordering a replacement. They sent him one, apologizing that the only replacement fore ends they had in stock for the Model 1886 were all exhibition grade walnut which was provided him at regular price. So the rifle wears an eye-poppingly pretty piece of walnut as a fore end. My friend was short. The rifle was just an old gun and not collectible, so he took it to the Knight Bros. gun shop in Fort Worth and they cut the 26-inch barrel back to 22 inches for him. He told me that if he'd known what the rifle would become on the collectors market he'd have left it alone for me.

The .45-90 shares the same case dimensions as the .45-70 excepting for case length. The neato thing about this is that the shorter .45-70 cartridge may be used in the rifle with flawless function and perfect satisfaction. Think of using the .38 Special in the .357 Magnum. I mostly shoot it with .45-70 ammunition as I have supplies of cases on hand and handload for another .45-70 rifle. Deer and turkey have been taken with the '86 Winchester. .45-70 has been generally used except for an occasion when the effort was made to take a deer using cartridges prepared to mimic original .45-90 ballistics. Bertram .45-90 brass was procured, 300 grain cast lead bullets were found and loads were assembled using full-charge weights of FFg black powder. A whitetail buck was taken on a rainy morning from 15 yards. Texas whitetails don't have enough "meat" in them to stop a frontal chest shot from a .45-90 which pierced him from end to end and exited. This rifle has a fine bore and is good for 2-inch, 5-shot groups at 100 yards from off the bench rest with carefully prepared smokeless .45-70 handloads. I never could get it to shoot better than about 6 inches at 100 yards with the black powder .45-90 loads.

Winchester Model 1892 .32-20 (.32 WCF) Saddle-Ring-Carbine- This one's an early Model 1892 having been made in 1896. Another Winchester I've had since young adulthood. It's so compact and cute and is great fun to have for hikes and plinking sessions. I've just loaded a batch of .32-20 in anticipation of fall rambles on our old family place. Through handloading, it can be near as cheap to feed as a .22 Long Rifle. With cheap cast bullets and with the minuscule powder charges this cartridge takes, this rifle is a great one to take out, with a pocket full of cartridges, when poking around in the shinnery in this part of Texas. Winchester advertised the cartridge as a small game round that would also do for deer. It's a bit light for deer. I'm tempted though to take a careful shot at one so I can say I took a deer with it. The rifle can be loaded to be as effective as the .30 Carbine round and that cartridge isn't shabby on the deer here if ranges aren't too long. It's a good, sturdy Browning design, really the same design as the Model 1886 only rendered in miniature and is still shot regularly.

A 1920s Smith & Wesson K-Frame Hand Ejector .32-20 revolver is kept on hand to compliment this rifle. Makes the .32-20 cartridge twice as nice.

Winchester Model 94 Carbine in .32 Winchester Special - This rifle was produced by Winchester in 1941, right on the eve of World War II. This is another great John Browning design. Not nearly as popular as 94 Winchesters chambered for the .30-30, it's a bit of a puzzle why Winchester bothered with the .32 Winchester Special. Guess it was a marketing scheme to give the potential buyer something just a bit different. And just a bit is all it is. Old timers have claimed that the .32 Winchester Special is more powerful than the .30-30 but this does not hold up to scrutiny. I chronograph tested this rifle with Winchester 170 grain factory .32 Special ammunition against another Winchester I have here that is cambered for .30-30 and also has a 20-inch barrel, using 170 grain Winchester factory .30-30 ammunition. Both had the same weight bullet and the .32 Special beat the .30-30 by 10 whopping feet-per-second. In other words the same for deer hunting purposes for bullet diameter differences aren't enough to make a difference. There's no real good explanation for the .32 Winchester Special's existence and the .32 Special has a 1-16 rate twist while the .30-30 enjoys a tighter 1-12 twist rate. Barnes "Cartridges of the World" states that perhaps the slower twist would better serve the owner who chose to reload with black powder (still being used to an extent when the .32 Special was introduced). It also states that a .30-30 with a less than perfect bore can still produce useful accuracy while the .32 Special's accuracy fails once its bore becomes poor. Likely true. Five deer have been taken with this rifle over the years and it works great. Longest shot taken was 90 yards and the deer hit the ground hard.

Winchester Model 1895 .405 WCF- Made in 1904 the first year that the .405 was introduced. The "Teddy Roosevelt African Safari Rifle". Well, that isn't the only rifle he took along. Yet another fine John Browning designed Winchester lever-action. This is a glorious rifle to own and use. I love the unique (for Winchester lever-action model designs) box magazine and the way the lever appears to "spill its guts" when opened. The rifle feeds fast and slick. Very reliable. The Model 1895 in this chambering is a horse! It's everything its historical reputation has suggested it to be. Recoil from off the bench rest is similar to being in a bad automobile accident. The kind where one walks dazedly down the road afterward. It's due to the performance of the cartridge coupled with stock design and ergonomics. The stock that works fine for the very mild .38-40 is wholly unsuited for a cartridge that comes within shouting distance of the muzzle velocity performance of the .375 H & H Magnum. Yep. Handloads have been worked up that gave 2402 fps from the 300 grain bullet. That's within 150 fps of the published velocity of the 300 grain bullet in the .375 H & H Magnum. My hunting load for the rifle gives a more sedate 2319 fps, similar to the 2300 fps or so that 1930s factory Winchester loads chronograph tested to give.

The stock has too much drop which accentuates recoil, the stock has a thin steel butt plate, its curve exaggerated which amplifies recoil, the stock is too short which reduces recoil control and the rifle, at around 8 1/2 lbs. is too light and doesn't contribute to dampening the recoil. The cartridge would better behave in heavier rifle of more modern dimensions, perhaps even being comparatively pleasant to shoot. But, it's chambered in a torture device in this instance. Oh, it isn't so bad when shot off hand and the recoil isn't noticed in the field. Load verification is a chore from the bench rest and is enjoyed for a couple of five-shot groups after which it's time to go do something else. 3-inch 5-shot groups at 100 yards with Winchester and Hornady factory loads can be had. Same for handloads using 300 grain Barnes bullets. Bore diameter is .412 so it was discovered that .41 Magnum revolver bullets could be used at reduced velocities for more satisfactory "plinking.' A side benefit is that groups worked out to be about 2 inches at 100 yards. It's pitiful to shoot Texas whitetail deer with the .405. On the only occasion it's been used to take a deer, a buck was shot at about 90 steps. He "sagged in place" upon bullet impact, much as a string puppet would do if the strings were suddenly snipped loose. As he sagged to the ground on the broadside shot, a large geyser of earth sprung up some 400 yards past him in the middle of a freshly plowed field. This was all most gratifying to see from my perch on the bough of a large live oak tree where I'd spent a miserable morning shivering in drizzling rain, having caught a bad cold that weekend.

Savage Model 99 in .300 Savage
- I greatly admire the Savage 99 rifles and would collect them if I was wealthy. Very modern design for the era when they first hit the market. Appearance is both dynamic and timeless. Gorgeous lines. Great ergonomics and handling. The older ones exhibit fine workmanship. A good sturdy action for handloading. A great uncle used to hunt in the Kiabab forest using a Savage Model 99 in .300 Savage and I was influenced by his tales and the appearance of his well-worn yet attractive rifle. He was old by the mid-1960s when we would visit them in Arizona. I was an impressionable kid. A used Savage 99 in .300 Savage from the mid-1950s, equipped with a Weaver K4 was one of the early acquisitions when I was old enough to purchase my own firearms. A large pile of deer have been taken, the .30-06 being the only cartridge with which I've taken more deer.
 

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The combo guns.

Winchester Model 1873 and Colt Single Action Army, both in .38-40


Winchester Model 1892 and Smith & Wesson Hand Ejector, both in .32-20
 

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The gun I regret selling the most was a Marlin "Golden" 39A that I traded for a Ruger 10-22. Dumbest thing I've ever done with a firearm! :banghead:

Have had many levers over the years.
Currently owned:
Marlin 336Y 30-30, 16" bbl, and short stock. It is a 2015 Remlin and doesn't have as nice fit and finish as the 336 that it replaced, but I'm not going to complain because all it cost me was the shipping to return the original one to Marlin.

16" Rossi Puma, Saddle Ring Carbine in 45 Colt with the large loop lever. Thankfully it was in my truck when I had the house fire. Action has been stoned with trigger and sear smoothed and squared up. Dehorned all the sharp edges and touched up the blueing. I put a lot of time into making it run smoothly.
Haven't removed the stupid safety lever or upgraded the sights, but that will eventually be done too.

Sorry, no pictures, am not at home.
 
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