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Have to say I was until today unaware of this -

http://www.cylinder-slide.com/sfs.shtml

It gives a sort of ''condition5''. I wonder how much effort is needed to tweak safety off and get hammer back but - in theory it seems to give best of all worlds and of course keeps gun mega safe for those who feel uneasy with con' 1.
The SAFETY FAST SHOOTING system combines the advantages of both mechanisms while eliminating their drawbacks. Available as a kit, it can be fitted into an existing pistol. The S.F.S. system is a drop-in kit.
The 1911 S.F.S. kit can be installed in a series 70 or series 80 style 1911. When installed in a series 80, the firing pin lockout system is still fully functional. The Browning Hi-Power S.F.S. kit can be installed in the new MK III Browning Hi-Power or the pre MK III Browning Hi-Power and the various clones. When installed in a MK III Browning Hi-Power, the S.F.S. kit retains the firing pin lockout system. The S.F.S. system does not eliminate the magazine disconnect on the Browning Hi-Power.

With the three safeties activated the S.F.S. allows the hammer to be cocked, and the safeties are then deactivated by simply pressing the ambidextrous safety lever with the thumb. The trigger pull remains light and accurate, allowing a very fast first shot.
 

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1951 - 2011
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Hello. I don't own one, but have shot a couple. They're not difficult to use and provide a way around the prohibition some LE agencies have about single-action autopistols. As you've noted, the system might provide some extra peace of mind for folks not entirely comfortable with Condition One carry.

A gentleman is going to use an SFS Hi Power for about a dozen IDPA type matches as well as some heavy practice sessions during the coming months and let me know his first-hand observations at that time. I will pass those along be they good....or bad.

Best.
 

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That'd be most interesting Steve - any feedback has to be useful. Thx for the response.

As I said - totally new to me so - my interest is piqued :smilez:
 

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Sorry, I just see it as a solution in search of a problem. If an individual is too careless to carry a 1911 in condition one, he or she shouldn't carry any weapon. JMO and perhaps a bit strong, but still my opinion.
 

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I agree. If you have a functioning thumb safety there is no reason to be worried about carrying in condition 1
 

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Very nice system,, had one installed on a P-35, so I could get approval for carry, Cylinder and slide was the first to bring the FN system to us and I believe they have one that has a couple of thounsand rounds down the tube with no ill effects,, mine has just under a 3000 so far... The korean daewao had the same type of system..

Took a little while to get use to pushing the hammer foreward and letting the safety pop up, and don't realy like the plastic levers.

Now that I'm retired it has become a safe queen, but it served a purpose
 

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I had one. (Still have it but took it off gun and put back in the box). It's a kinda nifty "hey, will ya looka that" little thingie. I have always been a little concerned about mechanical failure in condition 1 causing an AD, so I got it and tried to make it fire with the hammer down. (Rubber band holding hammer forward while safety was held down and trigger pulled). It has a split hammer, part of which is at full cock while the other is forward. The cocked part falling against the hammer in the forward position did not cause the gun to fire. However, at the back of the hammer, there is an opening into the coiled spring housing of the hammer into which you could drive an 18 wheeler, so I had a concern about it being a possible point of failure.

Then I saw how the thumb safety works on a 1911, and immediately removed it and replaced the standard system.

There are possibly a couple of liability problems with it. If one doesn't know what it is and picks up what they think is a gun with the hammer down and pushes the thumb safety down, they will have a cocked and unlocked gun with no idea of how to re-engage the safety. Think EMT or emergency room doctor or police officer after you've been in an accident.

The only reason I can see to have one is, as was mentioned, to keep a superior happy.
 
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