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Greetings from a relatively newcomer to this post.
I have been carrying for a while (G19) in a Don Hume IWB holster and it is relatively comfortable. But I have been thinking about going to an OWB holster and really like the 721H. They come in a model with a thumb break and one without. I know there are lots of threads about whether to have the thumb break or not, but my question is this. On most holsters I've seen with thumb breaks, they seem to fall back in place and partially cover the holster opening after the firearm is drawn. How does one safely re-holster without using the off-hand and having it get in the way? Isn't there danger (although probably rather small) of the loose thumb break strap engaging the trigger accidentaly and causing a ND? I know BladeTech makes a holster with a thumb break that pops open and stays open and out of the way. But I think I want to stay with leather and it appears that all of the leather holsters, at least the Don Hume I've been looking at, allow the retention strap to fall back in the way of the pistol as it's replaced.
Thanks for any input.
 

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A thumb break or piece of clothing in the way and snagging the trigger is a serious concern with ND.

I avoid them for that reason.
 

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If thy thumb break offends you cut it off since you can't pluck it out. :hand5:

Seriously, there is no need for a thumb break for concealed civilian firearm carry.
 

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My duty holster has a thumb break, and my OWB paddle holster has a thumb break. I really like a thumb break, very fast and easy to open, easy re-holstering. When you re-holster, bring the gun in from the rear of the holster, and bring it forward, this will push the thumb break out of the way with the slide, and keep it away from the trigger.

Thumb breaks are perfectly safe, if you have a ND because of a thumb break, it's YOUR fault:yup:, not the holsters.
 

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My duty holster has a thumb break, and my OWB paddle holster has a thumb break. I really like a thumb break, very fast and easy to open, easy re-holstering. When you re-holster, bring the gun in from the rear of the holster, and bring it forward, this will push the thumb break out of the way with the slide, and keep it away from the trigger.

Thumb breaks are perfectly safe, if you have a ND because of a thumb break, it's YOUR fault:yup:, not the holsters.
Pretty much what he said. I got used to thumb break holsters carrying them on duty, and they are second nature when it comes to un-holstering and re-holstering. Come in from the rear, and practice doing so. In your situation though, a well made, form fitting holster without a thumb break should do fine. You shouldn't have any "need" for a thumb break.

That said, all my owb holsters have them.
 

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Most good holsters have the trigger area formed that helps retain the firearm in the holster,I can hold a holster upside down and lightly shake it without the gun coming out,and when its on your waist you have even more pressure holding the gun in,but on the other hand if you train with a thumb break holster and it doesn't hinder your draw then by all means go with what you feel is more comfortable to you
 

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Back when I was a LEO it was mandatory to have an active security closure on our duty holsters. They were very effective and I never heard of an unintended discharge as a result.

Today, I continue to see LEO’s with security holsters and I still haven’t heard or read of any unintended discharges. My current line of CC holsters do not have thumb breaks, but it isn’t because I don’t like them, rather, there are simply not many options that I like. Still, I do plan on buying one for the same reasons as before.
 

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I have mostly Thumbbreak, mostly its just a matter of using the offhand to be sure when reholstering. Although I do have a few models that the straps fall out of the way and make reholstering onehanded easier.
 

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Greetings from a relatively newcomer to this post.
I have been carrying for a while (G19) in a Don Hume IWB holster and it is relatively comfortable. But I have been thinking about going to an OWB holster and really like the 721H. They come in a model with a thumb break and one without. I know there are lots of threads about whether to have the thumb break or not, but my question is this. On most holsters I've seen with thumb breaks, they seem to fall back in place and partially cover the holster opening after the firearm is drawn. How does one safely re-holster without using the off-hand and having it get in the way? Isn't there danger (although probably rather small) of the loose thumb break strap engaging the trigger accidentaly and causing a ND? I know BladeTech makes a holster with a thumb break that pops open and stays open and out of the way. But I think I want to stay with leather and it appears that all of the leather holsters, at least the Don Hume I've been looking at, allow the retention strap to fall back in the way of the pistol as it's replaced.
Thanks for any input.
A thumb break or piece of clothing in the way and snagging the trigger is a serious concern with ND.

I avoid them for that reason.
Good answer. I also avoid thumb break holsters for this reason. Now....on the other side of the coin, I have had thumb break holsters for my Glocks in the past, and with most any shoulder holster system, the pistol holster is going to be a thumb break for obvious reasons....gravity topping the list. I've also used a thumb break OWB holster for my Glocks, and there's a story to tell (I'm good at that sometimes) on re-holstering with thumb breaks from my perspective, and especially with the Glocks. If you're not going to use your off hand in helping keep things out of the way, you should at least LOOK when re-holstering. Much like the draw, it should go back in the same way it came out (I'm talking about any holster with a forward cant here....straight drop holsters will be different, just like your draw will be different from them. Now.......the thumb break holsters should have a more rigid strap on the inside (closest to your body) that should stay mostly erect when the holster is empty (or after the draw), creating little problems with re-holstering, and if it falls over a little bit, then you use your thumb on it just like you did when you drew the pistol, to keep it out of the way. (All this I'm telling you is for a right handed shooter since I am one). You point the muzzle a bit more backwards (toward the rear) than you did when drawing, and find/feel the front top edge of the holster, and sort of rock the muzzle back into it. All the while, your trigger finger should be out of the trigger guard (of course), but should be pointed forward and parallel with the slide, and at the same time, covering the trigger/trigger guard in a lateral line and centered across it's length. This way, you'll be protecting the trigger from the outboard, curved (formed inward) strap even though your rocking motion with the pistol back into the holster should sweep this strap backwards and out of the way, you still want to be sure. Your trigger finger will be the double check on this. Once your pistol is most of the way into your holster, and you've felt the outside strap is out of the way and the trigger is protected, your thumb should move to the back of the slide and push forward on it so as not to cause the pistol to go out of battery to the final finish of holstering the pistol. As others have said, most quality open top holsters are hard formed, or have a tension adjustment screw where you can feel confident in the open top holster and carrying with it. We're all different, and our minds work in mysterious ways. Confidence in what we do and how we do it usually comes by experience, or gets thwarted by lack of knowledge or the experience. I say every one who carries needs to feel confident in doing so. It's the essential link, and maybe one of the reasons some with permits don't carry on person, or those that carry part time won't carry full time. Know what I'm saying? By all means....if you want a thumb break holster to boost your confidence, then that's exactly what you should get and have. You work with (we all do) the best we have at the time, and something that makes us feel confident. Again...confidence is key. Confidence can mean the difference in a person being a seemingly easy victim, it can mean the difference in you going your way after an encounter without drawing your weapon. If the thumb break is what you're set on, then you'll work with it, and learn. If you want to re-holster with the thumb break, then you'll need to practice drawing and re-holstering as much as you practice on the range and shooting. You get it all together, and you'll be a better person for it. IMO, leather is nice. But...if you wish to gain more confidence in the open top holsters, especially the OWB holsters, then in my opinion, you should look at some of the hard kydex holsters available. They have a more positive retention than open top leather.....something you may feel more confident in. Draw is different, quick jerk usually compared to a smooth, fluid motion. You'll be more modular in the future, once you've tried out some options. If you're set in your mind that one holster is going to do it all, all of the time, then you're kidding yourself no matter how appealing the notion may seem if you're serious about carrying all of the time. Just one of those things. Nobody said it would be easy. Carrying can preserve your life and those you love. It's a change of lifestyle for most, for some it's an ideal way of living. For others, it's an interesting thought for a time, but yet they lapse unto the thoughts of the way things used to be and everyone left their car doors unlocked and their front doors unlocked, and America could sleep safe and sound at night. Today is today, and anything you need to do to feel confident in your carry is to your benefit.
 

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I have three holsters with thumb breaks. On all three of them, I simply move the leather strap out of the way with my thumb as the gun is re-holstered. I have tried repeatedly and have never been able to snag a trigger on one of them.

It all comes down to paying attention to what one is doing. It is the failure to pay attention that causes 100 percent of the negligent discharges.
 

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A thumb break or piece of clothing in the way and snagging the trigger is a serious concern with ND.

I avoid them for that reason.
It's only a serious concern when the person involved doesn't pay attention to what they are doing. 100 percent of the NDs are caused by the negligence of the gun handler.
 

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I have never seen need for a thumb break. A quality, well-boned holster will keep the firearm in place (even if you fall down a set of bleachers at a rodeo...another story).:yup::22a:
 

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i dont see the need for a thumb break as i have never had a situation where my gun has ridden up at all out of my holster....i dont think its a deterent to a grab either as the natural gripping of the gun releases it for all practical purposes...

at the same time i see no danger in it for someone who pays attention to what they are doing...its just as easy to snag a chunk of shirt while holstering with an open top...and n my experience the thumb break doesnt get in the way when holstering...there are plenty o fingers on your gun that can feel whats going on when you are holstering...
 

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OP, I just want to say this about the great reholstering debate:
Why would reholstering be a concern until the situation was "safe." Then you'd obviously have two free hands to reholster in any manner you wish. Would you feel the need to holster your gun when a threat was still imminent, thus keeping one hand free for something?
I don't think speed-reholstering is a big deal, take whatever time and use whatever hands you need to put you firearm away. Get the thumbbreak if that's what you want.
 

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I realize that it may be different for regular carriers, but as a LEO, I was trained to NEVER use both hands to re-holster, and NEVER look at the holster when re-holstering.
As an officer, and in every day life for anyone, I can see the need to switch from lethal force to hands on in an instant. Granted, there is more need of that for a LEO, but there is for both.
 

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I have the 721 Double Nine - Thumb Break (Hume) for both my Ruger P94 & SA XD-45. I have had zero problems drawing or holstering either gun. As mentioned on most holsters the wax paper trick for a new holster and gun works best for me.
 

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Here's what I used to do when I carried with a thumb break ... when holstering, i would use my thumb to push the break out of the way and holster.
 

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I have mostly Thumbbreak, mostly its just a matter of using the offhand to be sure when reholstering. Although I do have a few models that the straps fall out of the way and make reholstering onehanded easier.
I think you'll find in most training circles this is frowned upon. Being able to reholster one handed is like day 1 of Hangun 101.

I don't like thumb breaks. There are lots of other good retention options out there that are better choices IMO.
 

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I have the 721 Double Nine - Thumb Break (Hume) for both my Ruger P94 & SA XD-45. I have had zero problems drawing or holstering either gun. As mentioned on most holsters the wax paper trick for a new holster and gun works best for me.
What's the wax paper trick?
 
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