Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 71 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious how many Correctional Officers we have on DC I'm going to be taking my course this spring and I'm well to put it bluntly Excited! :danceban:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
After 10 years of service in the Irish prison Service prior to moving to the USA.. The word of the day is "NO"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Former, for a reason. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Unless you like loud noises and having grown men complain all the time then go ahead. Also it gets boring working the gun tower or in a housing unit all the time.....I hated it.........I thought I was going to see alot of action but that was far from the truth......its boring most of the time.

Also don't think you are going to get alot of respect from Cops...you won't...to them you are just a prison guard.

The only thing I got out of it is I learned alot about street and prison gangs which helped me out on the streets. Also I got to carry off duty without a CCW.

I suggest you go take the exam for Police Officer or Deputy Sheriff.....deputies work in the jails so you can see what its like working custody.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Very boring. I was always put on the yard first, even though we rotated posts every 4 hours. I cooked many days out there in 95* in uniform while watching a bunch of thugs lift weights and be stupid. Some people love the work but i hated it. You might as well be doing time yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Very boring. I was always put on the yard first, even though we rotated posts every 4 hours. I cooked many days out there in 95* in uniform while watching a bunch of thugs lift weights and be stupid. Some people love the work but i hated it. You might as well be doing time yourself.
I heard that....I worked in a prison located in the desert....man it would get to 120+ degrees and my boots would get hot.

Some CO's would bring in dope for inmates or the female CO's would get caught having sex with the inmates....what a joke...avoid at all costs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,908 Posts
Dang, you guys just took the wind right out of the soon to be rookie's sails.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,252 Posts
Just curious how many Correctional Officers we have on DC I'm going to be taking my course this spring and I'm well to put it bluntly Excited! :danceban:
Keep your enthusiasm, you will need it.

There are a lot of lessons learned inside that translate well to the outside. I'm inside by choice, and yes, some of us are considered LEO's no matter what the "real cops" think.

Inside you will learn about the most important thing, and really the only thing, RESPECT and how to talk to people, not at them. I've talked with a lot of city, county, state and federal LEO's and none have ever complained about a former C.O. who now works the street. If you can hack it inside, you really and truly can make it anywhere.

Working inside the wire is a very negative environment. Yes, it almost like doing time yourself. It will be what you make of it. It can be boring, if you want it to be. You could use that boredom to do cell searches, work snitches, monitor phone calls, do breathalysers, and many other jobs that maintain the security of the institution.

For the police officers that think C.O.'s are just prison guards, some are and some aren't. Just like there are police officers and there are Cops. To put it bluntly, I don't respect "police officers" but I respect Cops. You will learn the difference at some point in the future. Most LEO's can't do the job inside, and that is a pity in my opinion. Knowing how to talk to people is an important skill that I see underutilized by a lot of police officers.

Take care, stay safe and always keep your word. That is the only thing you will have on the inside.

Biker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,044 Posts
Gee guys, you are all sunshine and happiness here! What about the down side of the job?:rofl:

I was not a C.O. but was a steward in a union that also represented our jail staff. Talking with their stewards, it was not a lot of fun. But it was a job with (where we were) good pay and benefits.

Things to keep in mind. It is a 24/7/365 operation. While you are low man on the totem pole no one cares when you want your vacation, what hours or days you want to work. All that is usually (not always though) done by seniority. If your significant other has a problem with you not being home for holiday dinners etc. you might want to reconsider. Depending on staffing, turn over rate etc. it could be five years or more before you get part of a weekend off on a regular basis. And even then you might have to work the midnight or evening shift to get it.

Oh yeah, you will get to meet the nicest people!

If you go in with your eyes open it could be a positive experience. But make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Dont forget about working 12 hours with no breaks, eat lunch on the fly between rotations. I hear working at the jail here is alright and have applied to it, but working in a prison is nothing but ______.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,194 Posts
Gee guys, you are all sunshine and happiness here! What about the down side of the job?:rofl:

I was not a C.O. but was a steward in a union that also represented our jail staff. Talking with their stewards, it was not a lot of fun. But it was a job with (where we were) good pay and benefits.

Things to keep in mind. It is a 24/7/365 operation. While you are low man on the totem pole no one cares when you want your vacation, what hours or days you want to work. All that is usually (not always though) done by seniority. If your significant other has a problem with you not being home for holiday dinners etc. you might want to reconsider. Depending on staffing, turn over rate etc. it could be five years or more before you get part of a weekend off on a regular basis. And even then you might have to work the midnight or evening shift to get it.

Oh yeah, you will get to meet the nicest people!

If you go in with your eyes open it could be a positive experience. But make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.
Along with what mcp1810 said look forward to mandated overtime. I have had to do three and four x-tra shifts a week when the LT. would call me in my unit to say I was going to be my own relief officer for the following shift. 16 hours in the same housing unit gets a little old after a while. Sometimes I would catch a break and they would assign me to booking, escort, or the SHU/MHU.

And rest assured you will get ample opportunity to deal with feces, urine and spit.

Forget about your personal feelings about people who commit crimes such as child molesters as you will not only meet plenty you will also have the charge of ensuring their safety during their stay. If they get hurt do to officer negligence you and the facility are in deep do-do.

It's not all bad but it helps to know what you will be dealing with. Glamor and respect are two words you will not here much when describing the job.

All that said, should you go for it.... ALWAYS watch your six and have a safe tour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
One of the hardest things for me to wrap around when in there is the fact that you do NO physical work or anything, everything is done by inmates. If you see a piece of trash on the ground, you dont dare pick it up, you call over an inmate to do it. If you need a chair to sit down, you call an inmate to go get you one. Food trucks get unloaded my inmates in assembly lines, etc etc etc. The hardest thing is dealing with boredom that is always hovered by intimidation, anxiety, and a bit of fear. Best bet is to work for county or maybe state (which is what i did). The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is rediculous, the inmates word has higher regard than the officer. Heaven forbid you have to use a bit of force on an inmate, you'll be the one doing the explaining in order to keep your job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Keep your cool, NEVER give your word if you're not 100% sure you can keep it, and always remember that you're outnumbered every second that you're there.

It can be a rewarding job, and in fact, some of the jobs people on here didn't like due to the boredom were jobs I liked due to being left alone, like outside mobile patrol, control tower, and office work.

Also something you need to remember, the inmates are paying attention, to every little thing you do, what you drive, everything about you. They don't have much else to do.

One last thing, be fair to everyone, not necessarily nice, but fair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
And rest assured you will get ample opportunity to deal with feces, urine and spit
I have never been a guard, but I married into a family that.....half the family are prison guards (one is assistent warden and one was the leader of the squad when they had to go in and get a inmate) and the otherside of the family are the prisoners, lol. Most of the stories involve the above quote. My best friend is now a head maintenance guy at 2 prisons.... no, thank you. I wish you the best luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
Worked as a CO for about a year in WV. Before I would work as a CO again I would live under the I-44 overpass at Exit 30.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I'm currently a C.O. in Montana and I gotta say, everyone here has hit the nail right on the head. It's menial work. I tell my friends that I babysit Montanas finest residents... of course that's out of sheer sarcasm that I say that.
I've had plenty of people ask: "Well, it's just Montana. Not like you have many bad people to deal with right?!" Let me tell you, we have some nice and decent people and at the same time, we have the Worst of the Worst!

Check this out. I'm sure many of you have seen it before, but it still catches my eye each time I watch it. This guy is in our facility!
YouTube - Re: Montana Police Chase

It still amazes me at how wreckless and careless people can be. My girlfriend and I often talk about my job and how potentially dangerous it is. People like the BG in the video constantly remind me to stay on my toes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
The best advice to give you is this. Be firm, fair and consistent from day one. If you say you are going to do something do it. Don't be afraid to say NO. You are going to be tested as all NEW JACKS are. Just stand your ground and do not give away the house and you will be fine. Trust me on this your co-workers are more of a problem than the inmates. Figure they are bored to death being inside and have nothing better to do than talk **** about each other. Keep your personal life to yourself don't ever talk in front of the inmates as they always have their ears open for gossip. Do your eight and skate. But I say this dead seriously If an inmate ever puts his hands on you you make sure he's the one going to the infirmary not you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,194 Posts
The best advice to give you is this. Be firm, fair and consistent from day one. If you say you are going to do something do it. Don't be afraid to say NO. You are going to be tested as all NEW JACKS are. Just stand your ground and do not give away the house and you will be fine. Trust me on this your co-workers are more of a problem than the inmates. Figure they are bored to death being inside and have nothing better to do than talk **** about each other. Keep your personal life to yourself don't ever talk in front of the inmates as they always have their ears open for gossip. Do your eight and skate. But I say this dead seriously If an inmate ever puts his hands on you you make sure he's the one going to the infirmary not you!
Everything spot on....:hand10:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
If prisons were properly staffed and didnt have to work with their hands behind their back (metaforically speaking), it wouldnt be that bad. But as youll soon find out, its much different than that. Ive come across cops on the outside who couldnt hack it on the inside, its a world within a world, and 99% of people will think your crazy to volunteer to go in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
A good day is having to deal with 100's of grown spoiled children.Did it for 12 yrs I liked it at first but there is nothing worse than a long timer that has no incentive to follow the rules.
Prisons work on the carrot and stick principle and when they take away the carrot and you don't have a big enough stick (metaphorically not physically)you have no control and that happened in the prison I worked at I was so glad to get out.
 
1 - 20 of 71 Posts
Top