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Also here in NC last week,a CCW carrier walked into the Atrium Health-Cabarrus Hospital here in Concord with "a gun in his coat pocket".The gun discharged and the bullet grazed the shoe of another visitor.The carrier was charged with discharging a gun in the city limits and violating concealed carry laws because the hospital has signs stating that except for law enforcement, firearms and other weapons are prohibited .The hospital has metal detectors at the ER entrance and deputies on duty but at the time ,did not have them at the other entrances.




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I am a striker fired only tools guy. The reason is: if you freeze water inside striker chamber, striker fired will not shoot: no strength of spting will breake ice to move striker. If you freeze water in chammer if firing pin, hammer fired will still fire: impact of hammer will breake ice (you may need second pull, still). See HK torture test, that video made me think and converted me to hammer fired guy.
Now, this comes from hammer fired guy: stop bashing striker fired in general, and glock in particular (the last I dislike as it points to the sky for me). It is trigger pulled, in other words operatot error that causes these negligent dischargers. Lighter shorter pull just simplifies idiot's actions.
But choice of tool for me, and I am sceptical about myself, is simplicity and reliability. As far as safety is concerned: judge yourself how dangerous you can be. And how lazy. Millions of drills prevents wrong actions no matter where your bran may be in critica moment.
 

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The reason is: if you freeze water inside striker chamber, striker fired will not shoot: no strength of spting will breake ice to move striker. If you freeze water in chammer if firing pin, hammer fired will still fire: impact of hammer will breake ice (you may need second pull, still)
In what circumstances would this EVER be relevant? None is the only answer...
 

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In what circumstances would this EVER be relevant? None is the only answer...
I agree it would not be relevant in normal circumstances, but I would never say never. In extreme cold weather situations, condensation can get into gun actions and then freeze. At the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir in Korea, many gun actions froze, making the guns unfireable. Some militaries in Scandinavia have weapons that are specifically tested and chosen based on resistance to the actions freezing. So yeah, it's not a big consideration for the average person, but there are some situations where it is relevant.
 

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So the take-away from all this is it is impossible to be stupid and have an ND with a hammer-fired pistol. It that it?
25 year old me says, "Hold my beer. I'll show you stupid."

These days, I'm just slightly slower than average.
 

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I agree it would not be relevant in normal circumstances, but I would never say never. In extreme cold weather situations, condensation can get into gun actions and then freeze. At the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir in Korea, many gun actions froze, making the guns unfireable. Some militaries in Scandinavia have weapons that are specifically tested and chosen based on resistance to the actions freezing. So yeah, it's not a big consideration for the average person, but there are some situations where it is relevant.
And so our military went with a striker fired handgun?
 

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And so our military went with a striker fired handgun?
The look ahead for conflict is generally not in frozen climates. N. Korea might be an exception, but let's hope that doesn't happen. And like I said, freezing a firearm action is not a huge consideration, but it is not "no consideration at all."

In addition, I can say from years of working as a consultant in DoD procurement, that process does not follow the same logic the average person does. The big advantage of polymer and strikers to the military is that they are cheaper to produce and procure. Important note: That has nothing to do with retail prices. That is a whole other ballgame. It doesn't even have all that much to do with procurement unit cost, because there are all kinds of hidden costs that can get buried in a weapons system purchase. Remember the famous $600 hammer? That hammer actually cost $15. The rest went to research and development DoD wanted done that had nothing to do with the hammer.
 

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My general rule is draw quickly, finger off until on target, etc., but re-holster slow and deliberately, while looking at and into the holster...
 
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Gotta disagree with those calling the unfortunate trainer "stupid", or that he had no business being a trainer etc.. No one knows the guy, or how competent he is or is not.

These things should NOT happen,, yet they do, and to good competent individuals in ALL walks of life.. guns are dangerous when loaded, although thats not a common theme here.. Mishandling one is the usual cause of an accident.. Either that or inexperience.. However, good, knowledgeable, safety conscious people have accidents with guns on the very rare occasion.. Yes they DO minimize their chances, but even the very diligent and competent can do something wrong for an instant for the first time in his/her life, have attention diverted for a half second, or just plain have a freak 1 in a million happenstance on any given day.
If you are arrogant enough to say "It can NEVER happen to me", I would say that you are being very naive'.. Bad things happen to good, or smart, or accomplished, or even expert people in all disciplines ... bob
Yes, my friend, bad things can happen to the best of us. (Talk to excellent pilots who have landed with the landing gear up.)

Me? I only carry handguns with a manual safety. Yes, I know to keep my finger in the safe position, but I prefer two failure nodes. (I worked much of a career in risk assessment).

I do know that it's an emotional issue with many hereabouts, and I do not judge regarding choice of manual safety or not. That said, NDs are less likely with a manual-safety-equipped sidearm; and for me, that's important, and it drives my firearm selection decision-making.

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"Firearms Education and Training Center" I'd say the instructor succeeded in his job as he taught them how to NOT shoot yourself.
 

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I remember the first time I held a Glock. I asked where the safety was and dude pointed at the thingy on the trigger. I was like “say what?”
 

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I cant speculate about this particular guy but what I have seen over the past decade is a culture where "gun-guys" spend way way way to much time over articulating their weapons and have put way way way too much emphasis on doing everything ultra intuitively ( without looking). These same guys seem to be in a race with one another to see who can do the fasted reholster, the fasted press check... who can catch a ejected round in their hand and half a dozen other fan-boi characteristic which have NOTHING to do with fighting prowess.

Some young goof at the range the other day watched me reholster my weapon said.. "ha! you looked". I told him that I always look. He said "why" and I responded.. why not?
 
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