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I got the opportunity to attend a couple of classes here in Alaska. These classes are designed to teach you how to be a more competent shooter, no matter where you go. Though it can have the look of trying to be a tactical class, the whole focus is on doing things safely and in the most efficient manner for you. But the coolest thing to me was this short lecture about the three things that make up a good shooter. Check this out.
 

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Absolutely Positively Correct! If you don't have Mind Set Everything Else Doesn't Matter.
 

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1. Marksmanship- hit what you are aiming at
2. Manipulation- be able to fix/maintain your gun
3. Mindset- be a smart shooter, and stone cold decision maker when needed

For those who, like I almost didn't, watch the video.
 

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Yes, thinkers before shooters. Nice share DaddyDon.
 

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1. Marksmanship- hit what you are aiming at
2. Manipulation- be able to fix/maintain your gun
3. Mindset- be a smart shooter, and stone cold decision maker when needed

For those who, like I almost didn't, watch the video.
I didn't quite understand the bolded. I can understand knowing how to maintain a firearm [ as in field strip/clean/lube ]. I don't understand having to be able to fix a gun. Does that mean remedial fixes as in fte, ftfl, stove pipes etc? Or being an armorer.

I really haven't bothered to train to be a gunsmith/armorer. I'm more an end user. That took up a disproportionate amount of my time for decades, and never entered my own "training mindset" to become highly proficient at being an armorer/gunsmith. Perhaps it was the Corps that gave me that mentality. We didn't "fix" our guns in the Corps, we passed them off to armorers and were handed something else that worked. Field maintenance sure, gunsmithing/armoring them? Definitely not.
 

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I got the marksmanship part, but the rest of the rhetoric didn't resonate.
 
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I believe it's a spin-off on the Cooper "Triad":



Not gunsmith fixing, but weapon manipulation. I've taken several classes with instructors that have done multiple iterations at Gunsite and the triad comes up frequently. One of the guys I shoot with was a personal friend of Cooper's, went with him on several safari's and although I've never seen it, I wouldn't doubt he's got a Triad tattoo somewhere.

Chuck
 

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I believe that mindset and reliability should be the top two on the list. Hitting your target takes only really good practice.
A person should be able to go from amiable and friendly, to a fast and violent aggressor faster than a flip of a switch!
So, I put a non-hesitating violent and ferocious mindset when needed at the top of the list!
 

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Something I've been preaching and writing for years is mindset. In an imminent extreme encounter one of three factors is probably going to present itself: fight, flight, or freeze. Freeze has its own particular nemesis; hesitation. Hesitation gets good people killed. They hesitate for a variety of reasons but they all pretty much boil down to "I can't believe this is really happening right now to me" along with the fact that good people don't really want to hurt other people. Bad people have no such compunction when doing their evil duties.

Last year I did a video training course and one of the things that came out of it and made a lot of sense to me regarding the freeze is this quote...

"The key to avoiding the freeze is to know there will be a fight before it happens."

What this means is that you survey your environment, your surroundings prior to something bad happening with the idea in mind of what you would do should something bad actually take place. For example, you enter a restaurant, survey the room and where you sit, and take note of exits, passages into other parts of the business, the seated patrons, and a few other factors. Then you imagine what you would/should do if a person or persons suddenly burst into the place and opened fire. The trainer felt that in this way you have already given thought to what you should do so now all you need do is carry out your plan... with whatever slight modifications that may be needed. In this way, you're ahead of the curve.

To me this made a lot of sense and I try to do this whenever I am out in the general public domain.
 
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Mindset IMO, is 90%........you must be ready, willing and able to do what must be done without hesitation.
 

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From a training perspective, I tell students that the three general things they need, in this order, are first and foremost, mindset. Second, a sufficient skill set to get the job done, and third, and last, the proper gear. I always find it interesting on various shooting forums, including DC, that the vast majority of posts concern themselves with gear, be it the gun, the holster, the ammo, the belt, whatever. Not that these things are not important, but from a defensive shooting perspective, my take on this is that gear falls to a necessary, but third place.
 

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I believe that mindset and reliability should be the top two on the list. Hitting your target takes only really good practice.
A person should be able to go from amiable and friendly, to a fast and violent aggressor faster than a flip of a switch!
So, I put a non-hesitating violent and ferocious mindset when needed at the top of the list!
How do you do that? How do you go from amiable and friendly to a fast and violent aggressor in the complete absence of any experience? That's the rub.

Putting something at the top of a list of 'to do' is one thing. Enacting it, knowing you can enact it is quite another, especially for the peaceful, law-abiding citizen/civilian who may have never seen violence in their entire life.

As one person said, one way is knowing there is going to be a fight before it happens is one aspect. But that is not the whole story.
 

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How do you do that? How do you go from amiable and friendly to a fast and violent aggressor in the complete absence of any experience? That's the rub.

Putting something at the top of a list of 'to do' is one thing. Enacting it, knowing you can enact it is quite another, especially for the peaceful, law-abiding citizen/civilian who may have never seen violence in their entire life.

As one person said, one way is knowing there is going to be a fight before it happens is one aspect. But that is not the whole story.
This is true. I am also a little amused at those who like to brag about what they would do if someone blah, blah blah. Fact is, unless you have some previous experience with extreme encounters, you really don't know what you're going to do when something is happening LIKE RIGHT NOW. Yes, there are situations where most anyone can pretty much guarantee how they would react, such as someone trying to murder your child or your wife. But a robbery attempt or a burglary?? With those crimes there might be some wiggle room in the mind of the average decent citizen.

That's why I posted the quote about knowing when a fight is going to happen. This does not mean that you see it coming but rather you imagining a bad situation and how you must respond in order to survive. Some things are not very teachable. You just have to try your best to work through them and come out alive and unscathed.
 
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