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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it always better to have a easy trigger pull and quick reset a la the LC9S or Bersa BP9cc if you are a newby to shooting, and particularly to concealed carry? I am just asking because I have seen a couple of youtube videos suggesting that the trigger pull is almost to easy on the LC9S for concealed carry. I'd hate to accidentally and inadvertently discharge it while reholstering it or snagging it on something.
 

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This is pretty much up to each person's own opinion. Personally I don't want too light a trigger pull, but I don't want one ridiculously long and/or heavy either. I'm also from the "no frame safety" camp too, but again that's a personal decision. What ever manual of arms you choose, the key concept will need to be practice, practice, practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is pretty much up to each person's own opinion. Personally I don't want too light a trigger pull, but I don't want one ridiculously long and/or heavy either. I'm also from the "no frame safety" camp too, but again that's a personal decision. What ever manual of arms you choose, the key concept will need to be practice, practice, practice.
Yes, I found that out in the beginner class I just took. I have a lot of practice to do once I buy my first pistol. My finger likes to go to the trigger and hang out at all times, so I have a hard habit to break!

I was a little scared because my shirt came untucked (we were using open carry holsters with our shirts tucked in), and I didn't notice it when I reholstered, and the instructor said I needed to be careful because it could snag the trigger.
 

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Doesn't matter how light the trigger pull is as long as you observe all safety rules.. #1- A firearm is always loaded.. Always treat it that way and you'll be fine.. My firearm is always holstered except when I'm cleaning it or shooting it. There's no reason why I would be exposing the trigger except for those times. A wheel gun might be a better choice until you get a little more experienced in the use of firearms. And maybe get some training.
Accidents are caused by someones' negligence to be safe. IMO
Good luck and be safe...
 

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Like others have said, it's personal preference. My personal preference is a hard pull, but not a long one if possible. One of my pistols is a SCCY CPX2, and it's trigger pull is about 8lbs, which is about as low as I like to go. I had a used Taurus TCP 380 that I carried for awhile, but I'm not sure if the previous owner worked on the trigger or if that's how it was from the factory, but it required very little pull. With no safety on the gun I didn't feel safe with it and eventually sold it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys!

I will keep practicing good habits.

I was looking at the Walther P99C AS. Looks like a good carry weapon for someone with my concerns...there are so many choices out there, it makes my head spin!
 

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This is highly subjective I personally think DA/SA are the safest design and are perfect for beginners. You get that heavy initial trigger pull which will help prevent accidental discharge and then the follow on shots that are crisp single action.

I'd recommend you look at a small DA/SA pistol like maybe the SIG P224, CZ 2075 RAMI, H&K P30SK, Beretta PX4 Storm SC, or BERSA Thunder Ultra Compact Pro, or maybe even the Tristar C-100 (not small, but midsize).

I'd stay away from PPK and other blowback designs just cause they suck to shoot.
 

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Is it always better to have a easy trigger pull and quick reset...
Great question and as everyone has said, safety and personal preference.

I like my 1911 for carry. It's got a quick but easily felt reset with no pre-travel, 4 pound break. There is no way I put my finger on the trigger unless I am shooting. But it is dead on accurate, easy to shoot, easy to reacquire your target, and does double taps so fast it's down right frightening. All the things you need in a SD pistol and with a hard hitting 45 ACP.

I keep a CZ75 in 9 mm on the nightstand. The DA/SA is great until I'm awake. The long pull makes for a safer response.

My buddy has a a High Power that drives nails at 25 yards. The scary thing though is you cannot feel the reset at all. I would never carry that pistol. And neither does he. But it's fun to shoot something so accurate.

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This is highly subjective I personally think DA/SA are the safest design and are perfect for beginners. You get that heavy initial trigger pull which will help prevent accidental discharge and then the follow on shots that are crisp single action.

I'd recommend you look at a small DA/SA pistol like maybe the SIG P224, CZ 2075 RAMI, H&K P30SK, Beretta PX4 Storm SC, or BERSA Thunder Ultra Compact Pro, or maybe even the Tristar C-100 (not small, but midsize).

I'd stay away from PPK and other blowback designs just cause they suck to shoot.
I disagree with this
1. DA/SA is more functions to learn , for new shooters it is more complicated.
2. One trigger pull consistently will be much easier to learn , with less erratic shot groups.
3. Small pistols many times are more difficult to learn to shoot with. A full size will typically have less felt recoil, bigger gripping surface and a longer sight radius.

Over all , as others have said it is personal choice. What ever you choose , lots of dry fire and range practice will be needed to become proficient. A good instructor might speed the learning curve , with out learning bad habits too.
 

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I disagree with this...
What he said. Fundamentals are paramount.

DA/SA is something that needs to be learned separately. When I shoot with the CZ75, I do at least a full mag in DA, using the decocker after each shot.

Firing my little XDs 45 ACP iss a huge change from my 1911 or CZ75. Striker fire is also a major change up from my SA weapons, somewhere between DA and SA.

Recoil will cause new shooters to flinch thus messing up proper aiming, sight picture, and smooth trigger pull.

Honestly, I do most fundamental drills with a 22 Ruger, then work on the one or two other pistols I bring to the range. I finish up with the 22 again.

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I prefer a lighter trigger. The trigger in my G19 that I occasionally carry is around 3.5lbs. That being said, a lighter trigger should not be used to try to compensate for poor trigger control.
 

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I disagree with this
1. DA/SA is more functions to learn , for new shooters it is more complicated.
2. One trigger pull consistently will be much easier to learn , with less erratic shot groups.
3. Small pistols many times are more difficult to learn to shoot with. A full size will typically have less felt recoil, bigger gripping surface and a longer sight radius.

Over all , as others have said it is personal choice. What ever you choose , lots of dry fire and range practice will be needed to become proficient. A good instructor might speed the learning curve , with out learning bad habits too.
I don't disagree with you. I don't own a DA/SA currently for the reasons you state. But I've fired thousands of rounds thru them in the past.

DA/SA is a bit more difficult to adjust to. But like I said I think as a system it is safer than a striker fire gun with no safety and a 1911 that you have to monitor the safety (besides which most new CC holders will not be comfortable with cocked and locked!) My expectation with DA/SA is the first shot may well miss, which is somewhat likely in any combat scenario no matter what firing system the gun uses. But the follow-on shots will be single action and much easier to execute. And, as you said, training can overcome these issues.

Bear in mind that tens of thousands of military members learned to shoot on the M9. The ones who practice and work at it get very good. Many of them have still never shot a non-DA/SA gun. I've known many who bought a DA/SA CCW weapon because that's all they've ever worked with and they are comfortable with it.

I also completely agree larger guns are easier to shoot. But the OP said he was looking at a LC9s, so I gave him options in a similar size.

BTW - Namtrag, if I was going to buy a small striker fired 9mm, I'd buy a Taurus PT111 G2. My wife has one, and it is brilliant. Not a single glitch with about 400 rounds thru it (6 different types of ammo), which can't be said for either of the Glocks I own. You can get them for ~$200 from Kentucky Gun Co or Palmetto. It's an incredible gun for the money, and since she hasn't gotten her CC permit yet, it has supplanted my Glock 26 and become one of my primary CC guns. I'll be sad when she finally starts carrying it. I'm seriously considering dropping the $200 for another one.
 

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Considering all the lawsuits against Taurus,and how bad they are handling their BUYBACKS. that would be the last company I would trust my life too.
 

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Yes, I found that out in the beginner class I just took. I have a lot of practice to do once I buy my first pistol. My finger likes to go to the trigger and hang out at all times, so I have a hard habit to break!
You have much to learn about the proper and safe method of reholstering, and one very important thing is to MAKE SURE your holster is clear!

When I teach newbies I emphasize strongly that "if you even THINK THE WORD GUN" your trigger finger should point straight out! You don't even have to be near a gun, just get that trigger finger straight out each and every time you are near a gun or EVEN THINK THE WORD. Does this sound silly? NO - it is building that all important muscle memory that can save your own body parts, not to mention the lives of innocent bystanders. The finger NEVER EVER curves to go inside the trigger guard until the gun is ON TARGET.

If this sounds rough and tough: it is THAT important.

Best wishes.
 

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I think that with practice, you can adapt to a lot of different trigger pulls, both in length and force. I'm actually able to shoot the original LC-9 (with its looong and stiff trigger pull and short barrel) with good accuracy, so long as I practice with it.

That said, as far as safe practices go (and I respect the differing opinions here, of which there are many) a manual safety is the way to go. The risk of accidental discharge should be much less with a physically saftied piece. (I have no stats to back this up. Going on rational intuition. Contrary evidence invited).

If I carry a piece, it has a manual safety. There is no guesswork, if I ever (and I hope I do not) need to present my piece, I know to click my safety when I bring the firearm to bear on the target.

And, that said, I still observe the "finger off the trigger until ready to fire" rule. Rules are rules.

.
 

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Many options for triggers , the most practical of safety of accidental discharge and still smooth ,easy to use would be a light double action HK lem or similar (opinion only) Given enough practice and coaching any type can be used effectively. I have shot target light triggers to double action only shooting revolvers.
As far as Taurus pistols go , I would find something else. Their 1911 and Pt 92 might be decent , but my gen 1 pt140 was crap.
 
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I thought the same thing until a buddy talked me into buying that PT111 G2. I'd avoided them for years.
I had an early-series PT111 for over a decade. It was actually an easy gun to shoot accurately, although you had to learn the trigger to master its break. But the gun suffered some durability (note - not quality) problems and after its second trip back to Miami, I sold it.
 
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