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Mrs OldChap would remind us that such face coverings only prevent the intake / outflow of large droplets, not smaller particles - which can also infect. You must go to an N95 (or higher rated) close-fitting mask to be completely protected / isolated. Those N95 masks should be reserved for healthcare workers.

Now if we had only been wise like some preppers and bought full up NBC kits! Of course wearing one for any length of time is a trying experience for the soul.
Gas mask and filters also have been run out ... Very good idea but finding filters still in code and that will be sold to civies is very hard ..I have found few places that will sell non LEO/GOV gas mask gear .. Most that do stock it are old past safe date for disaple only

The one I have found get there from the EU and former sovit block ..Which means now well back orders for weeks or more
 
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The pink one.

I am seriously considering digging into my son's chemical warfare gear in the garage and donning it for my afternoon walk around the neighborhood. I'd probably die of heat exhaustion, but it would be worth it to scare the crap out of everyone.
Just need the mask ( and make dang sure it is one of the safe ones the old sovit ones have abestoso in them and some older US one have hexavlent chormium in them fun ) .... Frankly gas mask are the way to go I think issue is decaming them ....


The new models are not that unplenty to wear less compare to early era ones ..Larger eye holes etc ..Still hot though .. And best to use two filters to breath easier .

Most Hazmat suits will suck to wear long term for sure ..Ruber and other non breathing material
 

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Remends me of 1918 to be frank ..I have seen some of the old time manuals on how to make a mask like 1918 they were about this ..Did not do much for docters but prob did cut down some of people caughing it on others
 

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I remember a long time ago, if you saw somebody with a medical mask on in the grocery store it meant he had the flu or some illness that they didn't want to pass on.
(4 weeks ago.)
As far as I am concerned everyone around me can wear a mask. Keep your stuff to yourself.
 

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These masks, including the N95 models, aren't intended to keep the wearer from being infected. The idea is to prevent symptomatic and asymptomatic people from infecting others when they sneeze or cough. Nice idea but everyone needs to do it in order to effectively cut down on transmission. Good luck in enforcing that.
That is bad information you received. N95 masks are designed to keep the wearer from becoming infected. Many isolation protocols call for their use including inside negative pressure rooms. That is why the N95 mask is so valuable in healthcare settings with highly contagious patients.

Effective use of the N95 requires a level of competence which is why healthcare organizations require annual trading and fit test. Improper fit equals failure to protect. Just like the gas mask drills many of us knew, bad fit equates to bad outcomes.
 

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That is bad information you received. N95 masks are designed to keep the wearer from becoming infected. Many isolation protocols call for their use including inside negative pressure rooms. That is why the N95 mask is so valuable in healthcare settings with highly contagious patients.

Effective use of the N95 requires a level of competence which is why healthcare organizations require annual trading and fit test. Improper fit equals failure to protect. Just like the gas mask drills many of us knew, bad fit equates to bad outcomes.
Plus, many of the masks we have include one way valves; these make exhaling easier and decrease the chances of breaking a seal when exhaling. But those valves don't filter exhaled air, so whatever is blown out through the valve goes freely into the wild.
 

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Plus, many of the masks we have include one way valves; these make exhaling easier and decrease the chances of breaking a seal when exhaling. But those valves don't filter exhaled air, so whatever is blown out through the valve goes freely into the wild.
Right. The N95 is designed to protect the wearer not the patient.
 

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Wearing masks in public is against Virginia law. One person was arrested at the January 20 Lobby Day, and that for wearing a mask.
 

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That is bad information you received. N95 masks are designed to keep the wearer from becoming infected. Many isolation protocols call for their use including inside negative pressure rooms. That is why the N95 mask is so valuable in healthcare settings with highly contagious patients.

Effective use of the N95 requires a level of competence which is why healthcare organizations require annual trading and fit test. Improper fit equals failure to protect. Just like the gas mask drills many of us knew, bad fit equates to bad outcomes.
The N95 masks that I've seen are intended for those that do something like sanding. It says so on the packaging. They don't strike me as being able to filter out viruses which are a lot smaller than dust particles. Whatever.
 

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FWIW, respiratory filters (respirators) come in three basic types: N, R, and P.

N for not oil resistant
R for oil resistant
P for oil proof

The four common ratings are non-rated, 95, 99, 100:

95 removes 95% of particles 0.3 microns in diameter and larger
99 removes 99% of particles 0.3 microns in diameter and larger
100 removes 99.97% of particles 0.3 microns in diameter and larger

HE may be added, indicating HEPA.

Viruses alone can be smaller than 0.2 microns, so none of these is perfect. However, most emitted cough and sneeze droplets that viruses hitch a ride on are in the 5 micron range. Moisture from breathing is in the 1-2 micron size range IIRC. Anything that reduces how many virus particles are inhaled reduces the viral load exposure, increasing the human body’s ability to eradicate the virus before it spreads.
 

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I'm tackling a new project today. I'm going to make my own mask.
Apparently bandanas don't do squat, as the virus can be airborne without being in a sneeze or cough droplet.

And you know what was in the basement and is made out of the same basic material (polypropylene) as a N95 mask?

shamwow.jpg

:yup:

I'm going to add a microfiber cloth layer to the inside. It couldn't hurt and it makes me feel better rather than having a Shamwow against my face :biggrin2:
 

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I'm tackling a new project today. I'm going to make my own mask.
Apparently bandanas don't do squat, as the virus can be airborne without being in a sneeze or cough droplet.

And you know what was in the basement and is made out of the same basic material (polypropylene) as a N95 mask?

View attachment 320552

:yup:

I'm going to add a microfiber cloth layer to the inside. It couldn't hurt and it makes me feel better rather than having a Shamwow against my face :biggrin2:
Will the microfiber cloth retain moisture from you breathing? One of the reasons cotton was not recommended was due to it holding moisture from your breath, which the virus can stick to. Just wondering if anything that goes through the polypropylene will just collect on the damp inside lining.
 

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Will the microfiber cloth retain moisture from you breathing? One of the reasons cotton was not recommended was due to it holding moisture from your breath, which the virus can stick to. Just wondering if anything that goes through the polypropylene will just collect on the damp inside lining.


Beats me. More so than...?
And if anything makes it past the outer layer, isn't it a good thing to collect on something rather than being breathed in?

There is so much information out there it's hard to tell what works and what doesn't.
Here's a site that shows cotton being not all that bad. Especially a blend, which is what my microfiber towels are.
https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/best-materials-make-diy-face-mask-virus/?fbclid=IwAR100pyArKcZtEtzWyKc8e-xJ9sOQvC3-NqdHL4gF9qdCFUkSXylDPQh_Cw
 

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FWIW, respiratory filters (respirators) come in three basic types: N, R, and P.

N for not oil resistant
R for oil resistant
P for oil proof

The four common ratings are non-rated, 95, 99, 100:

95 removes 95% of particles 0.3 microns in diameter and larger
99 removes 99% of particles 0.3 microns in diameter and larger
100 removes 99.97% of particles 0.3 microns in diameter and larger

HE may be added, indicating HEPA.

Viruses alone can be smaller than 0.2 microns, so none of these is perfect. However, most emitted cough and sneeze droplets that viruses hitch a ride on are in the 5 micron range. Moisture from breathing is in the 1-2 micron size range IIRC. Anything that reduces how many virus particles are inhaled reduces the viral load exposure, increasing the human body’s ability to eradicate the virus before it spreads.
Correct! What's considered a sterilizing filter would be one that captures near 100% of 0.2 micron particles, because there are no known bacteria smaller than that. Viruses are much smaller than bacteria, however. As you say, the benefit of masks in this case is to collect larger droplets and particles that may be carrying virus particles along with them.

So, no common mask will be 100% effective, but many types will be partially effective.
 

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If you're going to make masks, you may as well buy a few MERV 13 rated home HVAC system filters and use that filter media.

BTW, replace those home filters with MERV 13 or better as well. If someone in the home gets sick the right filter can help reduce how much the home HVAC distributes the virus around the home.
 

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Right. The N95 is designed to protect the wearer not the patient.
I must have a serious misunderstanding or your information is incorrect because I came across the instructions for the N95 mask that I was using and it states "This respirator does not protect against the risk of contracting disease or infection."
 

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I decided to switch it up and put the Shamwow inside and the microfiber lens cleaner (came with a Nikon scope) outside, so I look more badazz, lol.
If anything it should keep people six feet away from me :wink:

4.jpg
 

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So now the feds want us to wear masks.

Like try to find one... It's like your doctor telling you to drink more water in the middle of Death Valley.
 
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I must have a serious misunderstanding or your information is incorrect because I came across the instructions for the N95 mask that I was using and it states "This respirator does not protect against the risk of contracting disease or infection."
N95 respirators filter 95% of particulates 0.3 microns in diameter and greater. Viruses are as small as 0.17 microns. A free floating virus not attached to a droplet can get through, therefore no warranty is going to claim they prevent infections.

That said, most professionals state the virus bodies are generally attached to or enclosed within mucous or other liquid bodily excretions, and the size of most sneeze and cough particles are on the order of 5 microns. N95 respirators can filter those, reducing (but not 100% eliminating) inhalation of the virus.

There is a reason hospitals want these as part of PPE (personal protective equipment). ..they want to minimize how many doctors, nurses, and staff get infected.
 
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