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Hello

Just wondering if anyone has any insights on using speed strips. One of my favorite carry guns, a Colt Agent revolver< has Eagle Grips replacement grips and while I like the better grip it gives me they interfere with the use of speedloaders. I don't forsee havng to make a fast reload but if I do how fast are speed strips?

KRobb
 

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Speed strips allow you to load two rounds at a time which is faster than trying to load one at a time by hand however, they take some getting used to, (practice), and if you keep them in your pocket they may come out of the strip after sitting down or digging in your pocket for something else. For obvious reasons are not real secure while mounted in the strip so that they peel off when you need them to. Still they are better than trying to reload one round at a time.
 

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Practice practice practice.

They will always be slower. Get that clear right now. Some very agile people can use them almost as fast as speedloaders. Notice I said almost.

Feed two at a time and then peel the strip off. I have to disagree a little bit with acp here. Mine are pretty tight and I've dropped them and even tossed them and nothing has ever come loose.

They do create a little bit of a paradox though. I find I can retrieve and load the first two rounds on the strip faster than I can load a whole speedloader which I can load faster than I can the whole speed strip. So if you really needed another shot in a hurry, I suppose it is faster.

But that's always been true of revolvers.
 

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Back in the '70s, there was a strip that had diamond shaped protrusions on one side. The rounds were inserted between these protrusions (the protrusions went around the sides of the case) and then the whole thing was rolled up and held together with velcro or something with a small tab left hanging. The rounds were loaded into the cylinder in a manner similar to a modern speed loader, but instead of having to FuTS (that's a scientific term) with a knob or button on the back of the speedloader and then hope it drops clear, you just pulled the tab.

Does anyone remember these things and what happened to them?
 

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That sounds like a neat idea.

Another thought occurred to me after reading that: there are different types of speedloaders. The more expensive ones don't require as much manipulation, but they're also pretty big.

Personally I think speed strips is where it's at for wheelgunners when it comes to CCW. Speedloaders are just too darn cumbersome.

I do have an Uncle Mike's universal Speedloader pouch that only holds one. It's actually not too awful in and of itself, but if you sit down wrong or lean on it you can sure feel it. It would only be useful if you knew you weren't going to be sitting down I guess. Maybe if you just wore it all the time you'd eventually forget it was there.

The double speedloader pouches just feel huge.
 

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Speed strips also allow a "tactical" reload--i.e., extracting less than all fired rounds and inserting new to top off--much easier than a speedloader. Conserving rounds can be important if you only have 10-12.

Dillon sells a Speed strip pouch that you can carry in your pocket or on a belt.
 

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I prefer speedloaders for speed, speed strips for space saving. Speedloaders can be bulky, and I can stick a speed strip in my back pocket without it printing. Since today I'm carrying a 5-shot .357 S&W 640 and a 6-shot .38 Spl. Colt Cobra, I can either fumble around with two different speedloaders or just tote around a speed strip loaded with .38 Spls.

 

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Man, if you are thinking interms of 5 shots not being enough, you either carry a backup gun or get an autoloader. Today's pocket 9mm's carry 11 rds, and the full sized guns hold 18-20. Why would you bother with a revolver, unless you think 5 shots suffice?
 

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I do think 5 shots is enough. Nonetheless, I think it is prudent to spend the extra few ounces on a reload, no matter what you are carrying. If nothing else, after I shoot my 5 rounds, I would like to reload before I holster. :)
 

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This Is Interesting

I read about one guy (years ago) that would modify & somehow alter a semi~auto pistol magazines to hold his spare revolver cartridges...I have NO idea exactly what modifications he made to them.
Regardless...he would alter them & also clip a couple of coils off to weaken the spring so that he could easily "THUMB FEED" his revolver ammo directly from the magazine into the revolver cylinder holes.
The magazines seemed to work just fine as a Thumb Feeding System. :wink:
Just a "tidbit" of shootin' history that somebody may want to try tinkering with.
 

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QKShooter said:
I read about one guy (years ago) that would modify & somehow alter a semi~auto pistol magazines to hold his spare revolver cartridges...
That's an interesting concept I had never heard of or considered and it sounds like it might work.... :smile:
 

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I've heard of using a Desert Eagle magazine to hold them before.

My only beef with that is that you're essentially still loading it one at a time, and I can see someone pushing the top round out with their thumb and having the darn thing fall on the ground.

I think if strips are not available, I'd try finding a belt pouch/ammo wallet. Of course it's hard to find one that's not camo, but if you did you could then reload two at a time by hand.
 

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I recall Thad Rybka (the holster maker) recommending "used/abused" 1911 mags as ammo holders. He sometimes packed a customized, round-butt Ruger Backhawk, with the .45 ACP cylinder, and had found reloading by thumbing the rounds from a magazine to be faster than conventional means (belt loops, pouches, etc.). By using mags that were already worn past the point of reliability in his semiautos, he was "recycling" to avoid waste, too!
 

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I have two speed loader pouches...

...which, I think, were manufactured by Rogers and go around the belt so that 3 rounds are IWB and the other 3 are outside. It's not noticably bulkier than a mag pouch.
 

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I only carry 4 rounds in a Speed Strip [skip the first and last holes].

I do this for two reasons. One, I have a stiffer tab to manipulate the little things under stress and, Two, the differences in times and fumbled reloads is remarkable when you start playing with just 4 rounds in a strip.

Whatever your reload time is with a Speed Strip, regardless of whether you are reloading a 5 or 6 shot gun, you will, most likely, find a 50% decrease in overall reload time if you try the 4 rounds on a strip reload. It has to do with the precision required to place exactly one carridge in exactly one hole, or exactly 2 in exactly 2, under duress.

If I am having to reload a snub nosed revolver, in a fight, I'm having a very bad day and I want to get some ammo in and get the gun back in the fight as quickly as I can. For me, 4 rounds on a strip helps accomplish that goal.
 

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Paul Gomez said:
I only carry 4 rounds in a Speed Strip [skip the first and last holes].

I do this for two reasons. One, I have a stiffer tab to manipulate the little things under stress and, Two, the differences in times and fumbled reloads is remarkable when you start playing with just 4 rounds in a strip.

Whatever your reload time is with a Speed Strip, regardless of whether you are reloading a 5 or 6 shot gun, you will, most likely, find a 50% decrease in overall reload time if you try the 4 rounds on a strip reload. It has to do with the precision required to place exactly one carridge in exactly one hole, or exactly 2 in exactly 2, under duress.

If I am having to reload a snub nosed revolver, in a fight, I'm having a very bad day and I want to get some ammo in and get the gun back in the fight as quickly as I can. For me, 4 rounds on a strip helps accomplish that goal.

Interesting. I'll have to try that on the clock.
 

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That's a pretty good ideal Paul and I'm going to try it for myself. If you only have the one gun on you, I think it'd be a good idea to prepare 2 partially loaded strips the way you suggest and put one on your right side and the other one where your left hand could reach it.

I know a lot of people who only load 5 rounds, because that's all their J frame holds anyway, and that way you can stick it in your watch pocket with only a little plastic tab showing. You can pull it out very quickly and no one thinks anything of a little piece of black plastic. I've had occassion to do this once myself.
 

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When I was in the Air Force in the 80's, the .38spl revolver was the issue weapon for folks like me (Officer, REMF).

My web gear belt folded over itself in th front to either side of the buckle. I tucked a loaded speed strip in each side and used belt keepers to hold them in place.

This was in addition to the (non-issue) speedloaders I had in pouches attached to the grenade holders on each side of my M-16 ammo pouches.

Never had one issued to me for real, but got lots of practice with my Mod 19 at the base range and had my gear set up and ready to go it the balloon went up.
 

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August 19, 1970 - June 2012
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To be fair, the "4 Round Speed Strip" is not my idea. I was introduced to it by friend and fellow trainer, Michael de Bethencourt.

Michael is a trainer better known for his rather unique folding knife program, but he does a very solid 'snubby revolver' course in the Northeast.
 
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