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Hey guys, and ladies.

I usually use Tuf-Cloth to keep my guns/knives form rusting. But, most of the stores seem to be ou tof both Tuf-Cloth and Tuf-Glide. So, would WD-40 be a good rust inhibitor? I have never used anything but Tuf-Cloth so I have no idea of the capabilities of WD40. My guns aren't going ot be out in the field getting muddy or underwater or anything like that, so I was just thinking about spraying WD-40 on my old Tuf-Cloth and just using that from now on. Your thoughts?
 

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WD-40 is a good rust preventive agent. So is Cosmoline, which generally requires that you boil the part to remove it. Lubricants like WD-40, 3 in 1 oil, etc. contain petroleum distillates which evaporate over time leaving behind the solids, GUNK. I wouldn't recommend WD-40 as a general lubricant for a firearm because of this property. It's probably OK for storage.
 

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I would use Break~Free or FP-10 & apply that...let it stay on your firearm for about an hour then wipe it all off with a clean cloth.
That seems to work very well as a general rust preventative.
 

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Doesn't WD-40 turn into a grease when the carrier evaporates?
 

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My favorite rust preventer is RIG, put a dab on a RIG RAG (an oval patch of lamb’s wool) and apply a thin film. Rig is somewhat like cosmoline, but with the RIG RAG you can apply a super thin coat and it is not messy at all. I always use RIG when the gun is going in the safe and not going to be used for a while and put on a little heaver coating.

One more thing to keep in mind with WD-40, it WILL penetrate a primer and kill it; I use WD-40 in the detached garage on the tractor and other equipment, but it never comes into the house. There are cases of LEOs dieing due to using WD-40 on duty weapons (spraying loaded revolver with WD-40 after a rainy night etc) and it causing ammo failures.

Another product I like and use on my CCW guns is Hornady "One Shot", it is an aerosol cleaner that leaves a dry lubricant film when it dries. Be careful because Honaday also makes an aerosol case lube for reloading that they also called “One Shot”, the gun cleaner/lube sitting here in front of me is in a black can, the case lube is in a red can. I like it because it lubricates without the oil film that picks up and holds dirt and stains clothing. Take the gun apart; spray it down, let it dry, wipe exterior with a clean cloth and you are ready to go, One Shot is the only thing I use on my CCW guns.
 

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for wet guns I like WD40 to remove all the water, but then treat em with a gun oil. WD 40 seems to attract too much dirt for me.
 

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Wd-40

F350 said:
One more thing to keep in mind with WD-40, it WILL penetrate a primer and kill it; I use WD-40 in the detached garage on the tractor and other equipment, but it never comes into the house. There are cases of LEOs dieing due to using WD-40 on duty weapons (spraying loaded revolver with WD-40 after a rainy night etc) and it causing ammo failures.
Yup, it IS a penetrant and will definitely KILL primers. For long term storage I prefer BLUE BAGS which are for firearms and give off a chemical that preserves and protects the metal. Other wise I use a dusting of Rust Prevent. I forget who makes it.
 

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WD can do OK as a preservative but IMO a lube it most certainly ain't! Keep out of gun's internals at all costs.

I second RIG as excellent but I also wipe down blued guns with an old cloth which is heavily impregnated with CLP - works a treat.

Also 'Boeshield' is worth considering for long term protection - it is similar to using a car wax but IMO better.
 

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No, worst stuff in the world you can put on anything you want not to rust.....
 

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It does great at its indended purpose though- Water Displacement. I used it on my 12 Ga. after it went swimming last duck season. Just cleaned and oiled afterwards.
 

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I expect total vacuum would work Jim but that would assume no moisture retained I think. If a fresh silica gel pack put in bag before vacuum pulled then probably that might help.

Can't help wondering about that odd fingerprint on a blued surface, with no protection - whether it just might still attack - but then if no air I guess it'd be good.
 

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If you were asking if WD-40 would work in a vacc bag, the answer is no. Although the "Dissolved Baggie Coating" might give Robar a run for their money..... :biggrin:


(Seriously, +1, on the dessicant pack, if you want to vacc your arms. A rub down with Tuf Cloth would be my first step...)
 

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WD-40 is water soluable, so when condensation comes along, the WD-40 is no help whatsoever.

We use WD-40 as an emergency machinegun lube and cleaner in the field. If the tank's M-2 or M-240's have been fired so much that carbon has built up and they are starting to have problems (basic load for the COAX is 10,000 rounds, with IIRC 7,000 of it in the ready bin)... it's something that you use in an emergency, and it's completly unauthorized (as are most field-expedient solutions) and it's certainly something I wouldn't leave on the weapon.
 

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My 1911 is somewhat in hibernation in a zip lock, wiped it down in Breakfree CLP, took it out last night no problems. Trust, WD is best used to free up some bolts that are stuck when you are working on the car or oiling some hinges. It is not practical as a rust inhibitor. Trust, me. By the way 1911 has been stored for a few months now. I hope to shoot it soon.
 

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On some important parts I've coated sealed fresh silica gel in ziplocks with the air pressed out. Rust can't form without moisture and air. Heat will refresh the gel. Some great suggestions in this thread! WD40 :eek:

If the internals of a gun get wet, heat from a warm oven will evaporate off traces of moisture from the inner recesses better than trying to displace it IMHO. Be carefull of too much heat, it doesn't take much to do the job if left in the oven long enough.

Finger prints contain an acid that works even without air. Strange, the human body can create the most powerful corrosives and solvents in the finger tips? Go figgure. Even super glue eventually falls off when we shed. (It's true, I saw a snake lady at the fair once.)
 

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I use WD40 as a solvent to clean my guns. It does a great job of cutting carbon and old grease. I always wipe it off after cleaning, though. A light coat of gun oil in the appropriate areas and I am done. In a damper environment that might not work, but in Arizona moisture is not something we have a lot of. I have never had a spec of rust here on any of my guns....
 
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