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Who here has a weapon light on their carry/home defense pistol?


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Momentary switch. I've also found that momentary switch on a strobe light, lets me get the "pie slices" of a room I am familiar with, that while moving, makes it very hard for anyone getting hit with the light to pin point me. Again, bursts of light and movement are key to disorienting others while keeping my bearings. Just because I use a flashlight, doesn't mean it's a beacon to myself, if I'm using it properly and not just walking around with it on all the time. This is why "tactical flashlights" have made momentary tail caps so popular, though Ayoob does give some traditional side button flashlight techniques in "Stressfire"
Could someone please explain this technique of slicing the pie? I keep hearing about it. Dont get it.
 

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No light mounted on my weapon...My preference.
 

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Had one for years... Went from a M6X to a TLR 2S the name of the game is to blind an adversary giving one the tactical edge.....

Just remember strobe and move...
 

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Could someone please explain this technique of slicing the pie? I keep hearing about it. Dont get it.
It's best explained with visuals, and it applies to (light or dark) movement in a structure where there might be a threat. Think of a standard door way as having a 180 degree field of view, and a person having a roughly 45 degree or so useful field of view, if you walk right through a door you expose yourself to all of the room on the other side of the door, but before you worry about tunnel vision you're still going to miss more than half of the details of the room, so if someone is waiting in ambush you may very well miss them and get shot. "Slicing the pie" is slowly leaning to your side exposing minimal amounts of your self to see and clear slices of the field of view before you enter into the room, so you can engage the threat before entering the bottleneck door way. There is much more detail and thought to be given to it, and introducing a light adds to complexity, but hopefully that's enough to when combine with the clip of it in this video, do give you a basic idea
‪PDTV Season V Show 2‬‏ - YouTube

And here's one describing the technique, yet shows the firearm pointing into the unknown darkness where there's yet to be any ID friend, foe or empty.
‪PDTV Show 3 Teaser‬‏ - YouTube

Note, these are ads on short 10 minute clips, not at all a full depiction of the methods.

Also, apart from shooting one handed with the FBI technique, if non-mounted flashlight is your only option, then you're fighting to co-align the light with the gun if you need to shoot to illuminate your target, one more reason I'm a fan of having both on and off gun options. And a mounted flashlight is friendly to a more traditional shooting grip. I practice flashlight holding methods at the range, but it's not as easy to be accurate as it is with a standard full two handed grip on the gun, and trying to aim the light and line up the sights takes a fair bit practice.
 

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How well do your nightlights work when there is no power? No electricity, no lights, no target identification.

Why does it have to be all or nothing? I have both weapon-mounted lights and handhelds. What will you do when you only have one hand to manipulate your light and gun? Realistically, you will need to open a door, you are pushing the wife or kids to cover, or you are holding the baby in your off hand, what are you going to do? Use a lanyard? So your light is now swinging around on your wrist and you are in the dark, now what?

As far as keeping a light in your off hand versus weapon-mounted, how much difference will it REALLY make masking your position? It's not as if you are turning the light on and leaving it on as you stumble around the house, is it? Light on, look, light off, move.

Archer, Blade Tech, for one, will make you a holster for just about any combo you can think of. Like a pre-rail G-21 with a mounted Surefire P101? Last I looked, Tex Shoemaker will make a one off holster if you provide the specs.

Shockwave, you are absolutely correct that a light can be a weapon in and of itself. I've had people drop everything and fall on the ground with a flash in the eyes of a good light. In the field I had a weapon mounted light, a rechargeable Surefire or Stinger for every day or night use, and a lithium Surefire on my belt in case the rechargeable died. Both lights together weigh a lot less than a Mag-light.

I'm not flaming, really. The most likely scenario most of us will face is a power outage. My mom was without power intermittently for over 2 weeks when a windstorm knocked out some of the main power feeds, in fact the entire county was experiencing the same thing. There was a commotion in my yard after dark, my shotgun light allowed me to ID if it was my dog or a coyote (turned out it was a 'dillo my dog wanted to eat). Same thing happened to my wife when I wasn't home and she used my 686 without a light and tried to shoot a coyote killing one of our puppies by starlight. She missed, it ran away, and the puppy died.

Reality and training should be your guide, not some mall ninja spouting wisdom from the 70's.
Dude, the OP asked for our thoughts on a mounted light and I gave mine. I dont really care why you are so anal about them.

Flashlights do have a purpose.... be carefull how and when you use them, or not...... I don't care.

3 more words for ya, nightlights with batteries..... It's not rocket science.
 

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Surefire X200 on my Glock 23, with a Surefire E1L right next to it. If you choose to have a WML you need to have a handheld light also. The handheld is to search and clear, your home the WML is to identify the target. I practice drills frequently. You searc with the handheld in your weak hand gun at the low ready in your strong hand. You then drop the handheld as you bring up the gun and activate the WML with a two handed grip of your gun and identifying your threat.
 
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I've said it probably a hundred times here... A WML is not a replacement to a flashlight. They are two different tools for different task. Do not confuse one for the other. The arguments about lighting up your family members or giving the BG's a target to shoot at are just plain old dumb. Learn to use the equipment correctly, and these arguments are eliminated.
 

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Sixto... I completely agree with you and couldn't have said it better...

To the OP, The TLR-1 is a great light, I have 2... Spend an extra few bucks and get the TLR-1S. It has the strobe function which can completely disorient the BG. Your handheld light should also have a strobe function...

Be Safe and Train...
 

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Most of the misconceptions about weapons lights (give you away, force you to point gun at everything you illuminate, etc) have been addressed, but I wanted to touch on this:

Oh really? are you sure?... Willing to bet your life on it?
I know I'm not the guy you quoted, but no, I'm not betting my life on my light cowing an intruder, that's why it's attached to a gun.
 

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When at home my XD 45C gets the full size mag and the TRL-1 mounted. I also keep a hand-held light. When carrying I have a holster for light mounted and one for not. If I am carrying daytime usually I go no light. If we are going out in the evening I'll go with light. It's just a tool and doesn't buy you into"giving away your position/muzzle" unless you actuate it. On the other hand if I have a single or pair of BG's in a dark parking lot that light will increase my odds if I use it weather I have to shoot or not. In my opinion getting hit in the face with my TRL-1 results in having to immeadiatly turn away in a dimly lit environment. If he doesn't just run I can employ the handgun allready pointed at his dome.

I've said it probably a hundred times here... A WML is not a replacement to a flashlight. They are two different tools for different task. Do not confuse one for the other. The arguments about lighting up your family members or giving the BG's a target to shoot at are just plain old dumb. Learn to use the equipment correctly, and these arguments are eliminated.
AS usual Sixto swoops in with the voice of reason!
 

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I have a trl-1s on my G22 but also have a small 650 lumen tactical flashlight with a strike bezel.

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk
 

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Dude, the OP asked for our thoughts on a mounted light and I gave mine. I dont really care why you are so anal about them.

Flashlights do have a purpose.... be carefull how and when you use them, or not...... I don't care.

3 more words for ya, nightlights with batteries..... It's not rocket science.
My analness comes from someone answering a question only pointing out 1 side of the issue. If the OP truly wanted input, and I believe he did, He should be presented all reasonable options.

All or nothing usually isn't the best way to debate something. It is certainly a poor way to disseminate information. You don't like weapon mounted lights and refuse to use them. Your justification revolves around nightlights in your house. Now they have become battery operated nightlights.

My point that was lost in the inanity of some responses still holds true. You should have a quality light mounted on your hd gun at a minimum, with quality backup lights for your hand. What will be more likely to happen? Momma is feeding the baby and hears the door get kicked in and the dogs go nuts. She grabs the baby and her gun of choice and looks for cover. Let's count. 1. baby in one arm. 2. gun in other hand. 3. perhaps she has a quality light in the hand holding the baby. Now she's at a locked door. How will she unlock it without three hands? Weapon mounted light solves many problems. Now she has her off hand available her options improve tremendously.

I'm trying to present information in a manner to elicit responses and MAKE YOU THINK about available options. If you go with a mounted light, train with it. If you don't mount a light, make sure you will train in the use of a non-mounted light. How many of us thought about the kids or babies? Of being able to use only one hand? All Hell is breaking loose and your goal should be survival, of you and yours, not wondering if one of the nightlights ran out of juice.

Sorry for the hijack OP, I believe a weapon mounted light is a good option that does require training. Non mounted lights work too, but they also require training so you learn or develop something that is safe, tactical, and effective.

Train hard, train safe, try to learn something from everybody. If it doesn't fit in your "Tactical toolbox" get rid of it.
 

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My analness comes from someone answering a question only pointing out 1 side of the issue. If the OP truly wanted input, and I believe he did, He should be presented all reasonable options.

All or nothing usually isn't the best way to debate something. It is certainly a poor way to disseminate information. You don't like weapon mounted lights and refuse to use them. Your justification revolves around nightlights in your house. Now they have become battery operated nightlights.

My point that was lost in the inanity of some responses still holds true. You should have a quality light mounted on your hd gun at a minimum, with quality backup lights for your hand. What will be more likely to happen? Momma is feeding the baby and hears the door get kicked in and the dogs go nuts. She grabs the baby and her gun of choice and looks for cover. Let's count. 1. baby in one arm. 2. gun in other hand. 3. perhaps she has a quality light in the hand holding the baby. Now she's at a locked door. How will she unlock it without three hands? Weapon mounted light solves many problems. Now she has her off hand available her options improve tremendously.

I'm trying to present information in a manner to elicit responses and MAKE YOU THINK about available options. If you go with a mounted light, train with it. If you don't mount a light, make sure you will train in the use of a non-mounted light. How many of us thought about the kids or babies? Of being able to use only one hand? All Hell is breaking loose and your goal should be survival, of you and yours, not wondering if one of the nightlights ran out of juice.

Sorry for the hijack OP, I believe a weapon mounted light is a good option that does require training. Non mounted lights work too, but they also require training so you learn or develop something that is safe, tactical, and effective.

Train hard, train safe, try to learn something from everybody. If it doesn't fit in your "Tactical toolbox" get rid of it.
Weapon mounted tactical lights...solving the gun fight in the dark with a baby in your off arm problem since 1985!...seriously
 
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I've said it probably a hundred times here... A WML is not a replacement to a flashlight. They are two different tools for different task. Do not confuse one for the other. The arguments about lighting up your family members or giving the BG's a target to shoot at are just plain old dumb. Learn to use the equipment correctly, and these arguments are eliminated.
Best comment in the whole thread.

All my HD guns have weapon mounted lights, and I have fenix hand held lights within arms reach in my nightstand and stashed around the house as well. I like to have options.

I also have access to a 24hour FOP range, so my friends and I run night time shooting drills with weapon mounted lights and hand held lights maybe once a month. It's one thing to analyze different scenarios and think i'll shine this, i'll do that. But you need to actually get out and train it. Shooting in the dark is a whole different ball game.

and in response to the OP, the TLR-1s is good to go. I could care less about the strobe function, but i'll take the extra lumens. =)
 

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I've said it probably a hundred times here... A WML is not a replacement to a flashlight. They are two different tools for different task. Do not confuse one for the other. The arguments about lighting up your family members or giving the BG's a target to shoot at are just plain old dumb. Learn to use the equipment correctly, and these arguments are eliminated.

While I respect your opinion... I still disagree. But then thats just my own opinion. As I say... based on my own training and experience. Life is full of choice. I think we just choose differently.

Spuk.
 

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i personally have a light on my HD pistol and have a TRL3 for my carry (i do not carry w/ a light attached i just have it for when we are on trips and stay in a hotel, i clip it on at night. however i also have a good flashlight bed side also and i bring it w/ me on trips. i am not a fan of using a light on your pistol as your primary light to check a bump in the night but at the same time if i point a pistol in any direction i want it to be lit up. so personally im a fan of using both hand light and light on pistol
 

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My analness comes from.......
Like I said in my earlier post.....
"I don't really care why you are so anal about them"

All or nothing usually isn't the best way to debate something.
I never said "all or nothing" that was you. I said."Flashlights do have a purpose.... be carefull how and when you use them, or not...... I don't care".

Sorry for the hijack OP, I believe a weapon mounted light is a good option that does require training. Non mounted lights work too, but they also require training so you learn or develop something that is safe, tactical, and effective.

Train hard, train safe, try to learn something from everybody. If it doesn't fit in your "Tactical toolbox" get rid of it.
Finally, you said something constructive. I agree.
 

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There has been a wealth of great information and valuable opinions posted on this thread, but I didn't like voting on this particular poll because it's only a "poll" where there are no right or wrong answers since choice of a WML is dependent on many different factors of personal preference and mitigating circumstances regarding one's home criteria including its location, interior/exterior design, possible threats involved, occupants, type of occupants (spouse, children, pets), normal schedule of daily events, and a host of other considerations that will greatly differ with every individual or family application.

I have a toolbox full of different tools for totally different applications; and (with exception of a hammer that will fix anything) it's impossible for any poll to determine whether a wrench, screwdriver, or pair of pliers is best for any and all applications - that's why I have a number of different tools, vehicles, clothing, weapons, lights, super-hero costumes (lol) and/or combination thereof that's best suited for my intended application.

Personally, I have no children at my rural home, no indoor pets, and no neighbors, spouse, or mistress who may unexpectedly sneak in during the middle of the day or night to give me a hug or cold-nose my backsides. But, since my worst nightmare would be to drop the hammer on an innocent person (or critter) when something unusual actually does happen, I have a number of different safeguards (and different tools) in place to hopefully prevent such from ever happening without compromising my own (or anyone else's) safety and well-being as a result.

I have a very nice high power, semi-auto rifle equipped with a night-vision scope to handle occasional intrusions on the property by huge feral hogs. I have a dual pistol-grip, 12ga pump shotgun (with an 18" barrel, extender magazine, and loaded with 7-rounds of magnum buckshot) which is equipped with a high-intensity LED/WML that is very adequate for quickly illuminating (and dispatching if necessary) coyotes or anything/anyone else that's running amuck outside or threatening my dogs. My convenient, light, small, easy to conceal and reasonably effective CC weapon of choice is a little Colt Mustang with no lights, bells, target sights or anything else that will impede a fast draw and instant "point & fire" maneuver at very close range.

However, when it comes to the possibility of an intruder coming directly into my home during the dark of night, a flashlight or WML is totally out of the question because both instantly become a target and point of aim by the intruder who has the element of surprise on his/her side, is totally on the "offensive", and fully prepared to empty a magazine on the first thing that moves (or lights up) regardless or who or what it may be. Realizing that I will not only be caught by surprise and in total "defensive mode" by an unexpected intruder but also be responsible for identifying friend or foe before responding with deadly force, I've fallen back on my old military training that says the best defense when caught by surprise is to create a diversion that will put the aggressor into "surprise/defensive" mode and give me the precious few seconds needed to turn the tables in my favor.

As already mentioned, indoor night lights are good for identifying "friend or foe" - but they are a constant source of light which is no surprise to an intruder, light you up as well, and can't be depended upon during a power outage from either a natural disaster or created beforehand by the intruder. My humble solution lies on my bedside nightstand next to my 1911 .45ACP (loaded with HJHP) in the form of an inexpensive little wireless-remote key-fob that activates two, wireless, battery-powered switch modules. Each of those battery-powered, wireless-controlled switch modules is hooked up to a high-intensity, battery-powered lamp (one in my kitchen and one in my front room) which are both located away from my bedroom. When I push the "panic button", bright lights suddenly come on in those rooms to (1) light up an area away from my dark bedroom, (2) provide plenty of light for me to identify who or what is present, (3) creates a shock and sudden unexpected surprise to the intruder which instantly diverts his/her attention toward the lights and away from my dark bedroom, and (4) illuminates my possible target very nicely :)

Once again, this is what works for me and only a matter of personal preference that is neither right, wrong, or the best option for anyone else.
 
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