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Just in the past week I've seen several misguided references to weapons conditions codes and alertness colors. So just for future reference, here are the military definitions in reverse order (or the order of progression you would take your weapon through, out of the box/safe)

Semper Fi
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Condition 4:
No magazine inserted, no round in chamber, bolt/slide forward, weapon on safe, hammer down.

Condition 3:
Magazine inserted, no round in chamber, bolt/slide forward, weapon on safe, hammer down.

Condition 2: (does not apply to the M16 or M9 or many others)
For 1911 style actions only: Magazine inserted, round in chamber, bolt/slide forward, hammer down

Condition 1: (for all except 1911 style action)
Magazine inserted, round in chamber, bolt/slide forward, weapon on safe, hammer down.

For 1911 style action: Magazine inserted, round in chamber, bolt/slide forward, weapon on-safe, hammer cocked. Also referred to as "cocked and locked"

Condition 0: (not in current military usage, derived from LtCol Jeff Cooper's "modern method" for 1911)
Magazine inserted, round in chamber, bolt/slide forward, weapon OFF-safe, hammer cocked.
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Most modern military personal only refer to conditions 4,3, &1.
4: No mag, completely empty, on safe. The most inert condition.
3: Magazine inserted, but still mostly inert. This is the stardard carry condition except when involved in direct combat.
1: Used to refer to any weapon with a round in the chamber. Typically only used when use is imminent. The safety is always on except when actually engaging targets. Marine Corps policy is to return the weapon to safe after engaging targets and before moving. This becomes automatic. Condition 2 does not apply to current issue weapons.

When most folks refer to Condition 1, they mean there's a round chambered, and if applicable, the weapon is on safe. This is not universal as there are many different models and action types to which some Conditions may or may not apply.

Please feel free to comment.

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Combat Mindset/Situational Awareness Color Codes
(pasted from wikipedia, but this is spot on)

WHITE: Unaware and unprepared. If attacked in Condition White, the only thing that may save you is the inadequacy or ineptitude of your attacker. When confronted by something nasty, your reaction will probably be "Oh my God! This can't be happening to me."

YELLOW: Relaxed alert. No specific threat situation. Your mindset is that "today could be the day I may have to defend myself." You are simply aware that the world is a potentially unfriendly place and that you are prepared to defend yourself, if necessary. You use your eyes and ears, and realize that "I may have to SHOOT today." You don't have to be armed in this state, but if you are armed you should be in Condition Yellow. You should always be in Yellow whenever you are in unfamiliar surroundings or among people you don't know. You can remain in Yellow for long periods, as long as you are able to "Watch your six." (In aviation 12 o'clock refers to the direction in front of the aircraft's nose. Six o'clock is the blind spot behind the pilot.) In Yellow, you are "taking in" surrounding information in a relaxed but alert manner, like a continuous 360 degree radar sweep. As LtCol. Jeff Cooper put it, "I might have to shoot."

ORANGE - Specific alert. Something is not quite right and has gotten your attention. Your radar has picked up a specific alert. You shift your primary focus to determine if there is a threat (but you do not drop your six). Your mindset shifts to "I may have to shoot HIM today," focusing on the specific target which has caused the escalation in alert status. In Condition Orange, you set a mental trigger: "If that goblin does 'x', I will need to stop him." Your pistol usually remains holstered in this state. Staying in Orange can be a bit of a mental strain, but you can stay in it for as long as you need to. If the threat proves to be nothing, you shift back to Condition Yellow.

RED - Condition Red is fight. Your mental trigger (established back in Condition Orange) has been tripped. If "X" happens I will shoot that person.

The USMC also uses "Condition Black" as actively engaged in combat.

Again, please feel free to comment.
 

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Weapons Carry Condition Codes, Awareness Color Codes
Good post. Most of us are quite familiar with the Awareness Color Codes but I doubt that many are familiar with the Military Carry Condition codes.
 

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Great post. New/Refresher information is always welcome!
 

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For Glocks with a chambered round I have always considered it as condition 0, correct?

GBK
 

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Discussion Starter #9
For Glocks with a chambered round I have always considered it as condition 0, correct?

GBK
Sort of. :scruntiny:
I don't usually think in terms of Condition Zero, since we don't use it in the Corps. To me, it's Condition One- round in chamber, weapon on safe (it does have 3 "safeties" :rolleyes: or something...).
But I suppose it could be considered as either since it doesn't have a manual safety lever per se.

The point is, for folks to at least be aware of some common terminology that gets tossed around by the military, LEO and tactically aware types. Sometimes professional jargon can inhibit the learning curve for those who otherwise have a legitimate desire to become more knowledgeable about defensive carry.

Semper Fi
 

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Roger that, thanks. :hand10:
 

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Great post.
Ooohrah!
 

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OK...


1: This thread is basically a "heads up" as to the codes.
2: These are Military terms associated mainly with Military weapons, they are not meant to apply to every type of gun out there, but can be applied if done loosely enough. If you want them to be for every gun out there, simply add the words "When applicable" to the end.
3: Regardless of individual opinions, the info is good to know. How else can one debate Condition 1 vs. Condition 3.:hand5:
4: The color code is a good reference as well as it comes up a lot in posts.


These terms get thrown around quite a lot here, it's nice to have it in a post as I'm not 100% if the info is in the glossary of terms here on the forum.

Regarding this thread and the possibility of a sticky, maybe. It's up to the staff, but it may very well end up in the reference section or as a sticky.


As a friendly reminder, if anyone sees anything that might require moderator attention, IE Thread hi-jacking / personal squabbles outside of "good ole' debate" rather than try to address it in thread, use the report post icon under a members avatar and we'll take care of it. The report post icon looks like this:



:bier: Carry on.
 

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Is it safe to say then that a revolver is always in Condition One?
 

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The original Color Code

As a comparison, the "color codes" as originally introduced by Jeff Cooper. The Color Code

White - Relaxed, unaware, and unprepared. If attacked in this state the only thing that may save you is the inadequacy and ineptitude of your attacker. When confronted by something nasty your reaction will probably be, "Oh my God! This can't be happening to me."

Yellow - Relaxed alertness. No specific threat situation. Your mindset is that "today could be the day I may have to defend myself." There is no specific threat but you are aware that the world is an unfriendly place and that you are prepared to do something if necessary. You use your eyes and ears, and your carriage says "I am alert." You don't have to be armed in this state but if you are armed you must be in yellow. When confronted by something nasty your reaction will probably be, "I thought this might happen some day." You can live in this state indefinitely.

Orange - Specific alert. Something not quite right has gotten your attention and you shift your primary focus to that thing. Something is "wrong" with a person or object. Something may happen. Your mindset is that "I may have to shoot that person." Your pistol is usually holstered in this state. You can maintain this state for several hours with ease, or a day or so with effort.

Red - Fight trigger. This is your mental trigger. "If that person does "x" I will shoot them." Your pistol may, but not necessarily, be in your hand.

And his Conditions of Readiness.

Condition 0 - A round is in the chamber, the hammer is cocked, and the safety is off.

Condition 1 - Also called "cocked and locked", this means that a round is in the chamber, the hammer is cocked, and the manual thumb safety is on.

Condition 2 - A round is in the chamber, the hammer is uncocked.

Condition 3 - There is no round in the chamber, the hammer is uncocked but a fully loaded magazine is inserted in the mag well.

Condition 4 - The chamber is empty, the hammer is uncocked and there is no magazine inserted in the mag well
 

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Can we add Pink to the color codes? That would be going from condition Yellow to being distracted by a cute female for a short period of time. :image035:

In all seriousness though, great and informative post. I think it's sticky worthy. :hand10:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
JD- thanks for stepping in!

Katana- I love it! We actually awarded a MCMAP "pink belt" certificate to one of our female civilian contractors who was especially fashion conscious.

OD- thanks for adding another perspective. We don't all speak the same "language" all the time.

Semper Fi
 
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