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I zeroed my dot at 10 yds offhand for Saturday’s RDS duty class as Brett Harnish requested a 10 or 25 zero.
I chose 10y after some research. My original dot gun was set at 25y, it’s too hard on my eyes to get a solid zero a pistol/dot at that distance.

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This is my B8 after multiple 5 round strings from concealment under tough time constraints at 10, 15, and 20 after 3/4 of a training day. This was testing the fundamentals that had been taught. At this point if you hadn’t started putting it all together you were missing par or accuracy was really degrading.
I was pretty tuned up by this time, but in each string I would have an outlier.

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I’ll get an AAR up this week.
 

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It depends. I attended a Dave Spaulding RMR workshop (along with DC member Kevin Rohrer) last weekend, and Dave had us zero at ten yards. When I zero off the bench here at the house, I'm generally at fifteen yards. Zero distance, at least on a handgun affects POA/POI so little for a carry gun that I spend no time worrying about it.
If you set up a new rig today, would you go with a 10 or 15 yard zero...or maybe flip a coin? Would it make a difference if the shooter was new to red dots on a handgun?

This has been a pretty interesting thread.
 

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If you set up a new rig today, would you go with a 10 or 15 yard zero...or maybe flip a coin? Would it make a difference if the shooter was new to red dots on a handgun?

This has been a pretty interesting thread.
Here at the house, I would go with fifteen yards, simply because that is where my zero bench is set up.

My daily "cold bore" authentication shot is on a seven inch steel plate at fifty yards. Targets at that distance always get a 12:00 holdover. The ten and fifteen yard zeroes are equally effective at that range.

Clearly seeing the target is, IMO, the single most important element for establishing zero with the red dot. Essentials like grip and trigger control are a given. Without all three, there is no consistency, and zeroing becomes an exercise in frustration. That said, and again giving credit to Dave Spaulding, these are my red dot zero targets:


Whatever the zero distance, put the red dot COM and work from there.

As dumb as it sounds, make sure the screws holding the sight to the slide are tight, and stay tight. If you are doing everything right and the sight simply will not establish zero, check the screws.

Also be aware that red dot sights will go bad. I ruined a Trijicon running .45 Supers through my Glock 21. It simply quit holding zero. Also be aware that defective ones sometimes come from the factory bad.

While red dot sights generally are of solid construction, care should be taken with them. Don't do combat slide racks with them, or deliberately get down in the dirt with them. Sight pictures get tough when mud, dirt or water get splashed on the glass or emitter. Worse still when the glass gets cracked or shattered.
 

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For a defensive pistol somewhere between 15 and 25 yards should be good, but you should be aware of how your gun shoots at each distance.
 

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Here at the house, I would go with fifteen yards, simply because that is where my zero bench is set up.

My daily "cold bore" authentication shot is on a seven inch steel plate at fifty yards. Targets at that distance always get a 12:00 holdover. The ten and fifteen yard zeroes are equally effective at that range.

Clearly seeing the target is, IMO, the single most important element for establishing zero with the red dot. Essentials like grip and trigger control are a given. Without all three, there is no consistency, and zeroing becomes an exercise in frustration. That said, and again giving credit to Dave Spaulding, these are my red dot zero targets:


Whatever the zero distance, put the red dot COM and work from there.

As dumb as it sounds, make sure the screws holding the sight to the slide are tight, and stay tight. If you are doing everything right and the sight simply will not establish zero, check the screws.

Also be aware that red dot sights will go bad. I ruined a Trijicon running .45 Supers through my Glock 21. It simply quit holding zero. Also be aware that defective ones sometimes come from the factory bad.

While red dot sights generally are of solid construction, care should be taken with them. Don't do combat slide racks with them, or deliberately get down in the dirt with them. Sight pictures get tough when mud, dirt or water get splashed on the glass or emitter. Worse still when the glass gets cracked or shattered.

Thanks for the information!
 

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Once upon a time I "zeroed" my handguns at25 yards, because I was told that most manufacturer's recommend a 25 yard zero. After I started being more concerned about POI I was told by "Dawson precision" that they calculate their sight heights at 20 yards. Since then I have "gone with" 20 yards because that's what they use. Inside of 25 yards, I really don't think fractions of an inch will matter much.
 

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I looked at a couple of 9mm ballistic charts. The drop at 25 yards seems to be an inch or less. If anyone with a red dot zeroed it at 10 yards, they'd likely be within a half inch anywhere from point blank to 25 yards, which should be more than good enough.
 

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If you can chew up the center at 10yds you can certainly cause some discomfort at 25. Nice shooting. The only red dot that I have is on my 300 Blk AR pistol. I think that it's probably zeroed at about 60yds.
 
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