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😂 Going to "limit yourself from that new rifle"?
2018 and forward would give me access to any of my Sigs, my Barrett Rec 10, or my Tavor TS12.
 

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I'm comfortable with anything like a SAA or Scholfield and a winchester to a plastic fantastic and a Tavor,,,,,as far as that goes I know the basics of a shield and sword or short spear if I had to, I would truthfully take those and a recurve bow over any of the flintlock/matchlock or other precartridge firearms because I know how to survive with them
 

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I have a 1911 from 1919, and a Pre Model 10 from 1917. Both of those are as viable today as they were when new!
I bought a Rem model 12 pump 22 from an old Armenian neighbor. She said it was the first new thing her husband bought after immigrating in 1916. He wasn't allowed to own a gun in the old country. But here every man need a gun to defend his wife and farm! After replacing the extractor and firing pin it still shoots well enough that I still hunt with it! It will still defend the farm! DR
 

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I would agree Kilted Cowboy.

Browning designs are still relevant and serviceable.
 

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Metallic cartridge era. I wouldn't feel too bad at all with a Colt conversion type revolver under a coat and a Remington derringer in .41 in a vest pocket. And I think a Merwin, Hulbert & Co revolver would be a great companion as well.
 

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For a handgun I could live with a S&W Model 3 in .44 Russian. For a long gun either a 98 Mauser or Lee Enfield. And I would want to be able to reload ammo. Good thread!
 
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I would be comfortable in an era with any rifled repeating firearm. I've been reading Civil War stuff and the thought of fighting with a long gun firing at a rate of 2 to 3 shots per minute after performing a number of reloading steps in between each shot is scary stuff. Repeaters, yeah, that's the ticket.
 

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I've long thought I could do quite well with a Krag Jorgensen and it's .30-40 cartridge for most any purpose on North America and give me a clip fed pre-1898 Mauser or Enfield and I could keep up an enthusiastic rate of rapid fire.
 

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Anything in the period of reliable cartridge guns (does not need to be smokeless but would help)

if we are talking idel times prob anything pre 1934 USA as you could own whatever you wanted sure you might be able to legally carry it but more cool stuff to own ..

If carrying any thing 1890s on is fine ..Plenty of fine fixed round guns to use ...
 

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Probably 1911.
 
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Gotta supply some photographs. These would describe the era that many mention in posts in this thread.

A cousin came for a weekend last year and we had a vintage handgun shoot. He brought an original U. S. Army issue Model 1873 which is the military contract version of the Colt Single Action Army in .45 Colt. His example was made in 1878 and arsenal upgraded to shortened 5 1/2-inch barrel after 1900. I have a Spanish American war era Colt Model 1901 .38 Long Colt which is the military contract version of the Colt New Army. My example was actually manufactured in 1892 and upgraded to Model 1901 configuration and so marked. Also have a Colt Model 1909 which was made in 1910. This one is the military contract version of the Colt New Service in .45 Long Colt.

I've never been fond of that Model 1901 in .38 Colt, but the Model 1873 .45 Colt is adequate in trained hands and the cartridge is undeniably first rate. The Model 1909, also in .45 Colt is still a most excellent choice for handgun needs. I would not feel cheated to be totin' the Model 1909 revolver rather than a 1911 for personal protection. Here they are all sooted up and fingerprinted after our range afternoon.


Colt introduced the first .45 automatic in 1905 with the Model 1905. Loads and operates like the Model 1911. Livable design if primitive by current standards. My feelings wouldn't be hurt if I had to press this model Colt into service for personal defense. Magazines, while appearing to look the same as 1911 magazines have some minor differences and are impossible to find. Supposedly 1911 magazines may be modified to work though I've never tried it.


Smith & Wesson Hand Ejector Military & Police in .38 Special. Later to be known as the Model 10. The renowned K-Frame Smith & Wesson. Introduced in 1899 with the .38 Special cartridge, this one was made in 1904 and would serve just as any other K-Frame .38 Special made in the 100-plus years since. Looks like a sad junker, but is mechanically sound as a dollar.



Smith & Wesson Hand Ejector New Century "Triple Lock." Introduced in 1908, this one was made around 1910 and chambers .44 Special. The Triple Lock represents the first N-Frame. Just as useful today as any big bore N-Frame Smith & Wesson.


We didn't even discuss the Webley revolver designs of the 1880-1920 period or the Luger, both of which could do the job.

Rilfes

Krag Jorgenson. 'Nuff said. Powerful accurate repeating design slightly hampered by lack of stripper clip loading. This one was made in early 1894.


Model 1903 Springfield. Even better than the Krag above. This one's not hampered by lack of stripper clip loading and chambers .30-06. Very potent and accurate. A rapid rate of aimed fire can be laid down with one of these and a cartridge belt of clipped ammunition. This one dates to 1913, but the design entered service in 1903.


Any Mauser from the 1890s/early 1900s period taking a stripper clip would be as good as the '03 Sprinfield as would the Lee Enfields of the era or other nations' bolt-action rifles that could be named.

Winchester lever-action rifles (Marlin lever-actions of the era would do as well). Speedy rapid fire capabilities using capable cartridges. A bit poky to reload rapidly.
All Winchesters in the photo date from 1887 to 1904 except the Model 94 carbine 4th from the top. The Savage doesn't count here.


One wouldn't be as severely hampered without AR 15 and high-capacity pistol capabilities as might be assumed.

Perhaps y'all can stick up some photos of your own old favorites.
 

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I would say 1911 - but one without a beavertail grip safety is intolerable.
So, 1988 - that is when Glock 17 came to the US and I was legally old enough to buy a handgun.
 

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WWI-II era. M-1 carbine, M1 Garand, BAR, 1911, Thompson...

What more could a man ask for?
 
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