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I am a 20 year old female, and am planning on getting my concealed carry when I turn 21. However, I've started to research guns now, but there are so many options I really don't know where to start. I need a gun that will be a good fit for my small hands, and easy to shoot if I'm ever in a threatening situation. So far I've shot a Glock, but I'm not sure if that would be the best fit for me.
 

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Go to a range that rents guns and try a bunch out. Nobody can tell you what is best for you (although we'll all give it a shot). Glock 19 or 26 run $499 in my neck of the woods.
 

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Thank you! I'll have to try both of those out! I've only recently become interested in guns so there is a lot I need to learn.
 

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depending on your size concealability becomes a factor as well. A 4" revolver may be very comfy to shoot, but a beast to carry. A snub nose revolver is easier to carry, but can take some training (at least practice) to be proficient with. It is the balance that many of us search for and some have found.

I highly recommend against purse carry FWIW. Welcome to the non victim side, stay safe.
 
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LCR is a great firearm as I have pointed out before - and I have one as a bug myself - but it is not an easy gun to practice with. It is a hand stinger for sure. Just throwing that out there, which could come into play as you will need to shoot it a lot to become proficient with it. Test fire one if you are able before buying. If it does not bother you too much (I can deal with it ok) then it is a great recommendation for you, OP.
 

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Go to a range that rents guns and try a bunch out. Nobody can tell you what is best for you (although we'll all give it a shot). Glock 19 or 26 run $499 in my neck of the woods.
Going to the range and trying some of the gun they have for rent is a great idea. If they do not a Ruger LC380 or Bersa 380CC check out another range to see if they have them. These 2 guns should be in your gun trials so you can make a complete choice of a gun that suits you...
Best of luck and remember getting a carry gun is like picking a husband ---- (you have to love him and he must work.).

:danceban:
 

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+1 for a Glock 19, 9mm. Get a Gen 3 if you can, Gen 4, if not.

You might well also consider a Smith & Wesson M&P compact 9mm.

As regards NOT carrying in a purse...I agree belt & holster carry are best. There are a lot of ways to carry.

But, I learned that many women are NOT going to belt & holster carry. That being the case, galco makes some womens carry purses, and the option I sometimes use, that some women like as well, is a Maxpedition Versapak.

Im a guy, and when I carry it, no one ever gives it or me a second look. Im still amazed by that, btw. But its a great option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Going to the range and trying some of the gun they have for rent is a great idea. If they do not a Ruger LC380 or Bersa 380CC check out another range to see if they have them. These 2 guns should be in your gun trials so you can make a complete choice of a gun that suits you...
Best of luck and remember getting a carry gun is like picking a husband ---- (you have to love him and he must work.).

:danceban:
Haha that is good advice! Thank you!
 

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I am a 20 year old female, and am planning on getting my concealed carry when I turn 21. However, I've started to research guns now, but there are so many options I really don't know where to start. I need a gun that will be a good fit for my small hands, and easy to shoot if I'm ever in a threatening situation. So far I've shot a Glock, but I'm not sure if that would be the best fit for me.
The BEST gun for you is the one YOU shoot the BEST!!!!!!!!! Follow the advice others have posted and get to a range that rents. If you can't locate one that rents go to one that has a lot of shooters. Most will be very happy to let you shoot a few rounds to help make your decision.

Good luck and let us know what you decide.
 

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I am going to recommend you look at a Ruger SR9c. LCRs are nice but they are a little hard to learn to shoot with and can be a little hard to practice with. They are great carry guns though. The SR9C is bigger and heaver and so makes it easier to shoot and to practice with.
 

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Welcome MarianaJoy.

Revolvers are very reliable, but tend to be more difficult to shoot accurately when compared to semi-automatics. The main reason is revolvers have long and heavy trigger pulls compared to most semi's. The small revolvers can also kick a bit, but you can tame them by using standard pressure (i.e., not +P) ammo.

As others have mentioned, you need to try out several guns at a range. For revolvers, I recommend sticking to the "five shot" j-frame size. For semi's, I recommend sticking to the "sub-compact" or "compact" size. I recently acquired a Smith and Wesson Shield and I really like it. It also accommodates my wife's grip very well. However, the Shield is just one gun of many that are under $500.

Unless you are lucky, no one gun will be perfect. Each gun you try will like have some positives and some negatives to you; this is really subjective, so it's very difficult to make a recommendation with any confidence. All I can suggest is try out several or more, and pick one with with which you feel most comfortable.

A word about purchasing a gun - watch out for the "upseller." You'll know him when you see him.

You may also want to check out Cornered Cat | If you have to fight, fight like a cornered cat. - a blog with a woman's perspective on concealed carry.

Edit: And this page in particular: http://www.corneredcat.com/article/choosing-firearms/trying-on-a-handgun/
 

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Going to the range and trying some of the gun they have for rent is a great idea. If they do not a Ruger LC380 or Bersa 380CC check out another range to see if they have them. These 2 guns should be in your gun trials so you can make a complete choice of a gun that suits you...
Best of luck and remember getting a carry gun is like picking a husband ---- (you have to love him and he must work.).

:danceban:
The LC380 and Bersa Thunder are great recommendations for semis. The .380 is a light round that requires lighter slides and softer springs. Very easily manipulated, very light recoil and a good platform to learn semi auto pistols with. The .380 ACP isn't a great round but it can get the job done for typical SD situations. Just be sure to carry a magazine or two spare.
 

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LCR is a great firearm as I have pointed out before - and I have one as a bug myself - but it is not an easy gun to practice with. It is a hand stinger for sure. Just throwing that out there, which could come into play as you will need to shoot it a lot to become proficient with it. Test fire one if you are able before buying. If it does not bother you too much (I can deal with it ok) then it is a great recommendation for you, OP.
Agreed on the LCR, and agreed that it can be a little rough on the hands. You might want to consider an LCR chambered for .357 Magnum, instead of the .38 Special version. (You can shoot either .357 Magnum or .38 Special ammunition in a .357 Magnum revolver, but you CAN'T shoot .357 Magnum ammo in a .38 Special revolver.) The advantage of the .357 version of the LCR is that it's about 4 or 5 ounces heavier, so it kicks less when using .38 Special ammo. I would NOT recommend trying .357 ammo until you have some practice in, however, that REALLY kicks in such a small gun.

Also agreed that the main thing is to find a gun that's comfortable for you, and that's reliable. If you try the LCR and don't like it, there are many other good options.
 

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I'll bite...what are the strong selling points of a hard-to-shoot hand stinger for a young female shooter?
 

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I would advise you to take another class at your range, they should let you try a couple of guns in the class an you can meet others there and try theirs, or

Phazer
 

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To subjective to answer IMO. Just don't discount guns because they look too big. There are many guns, up to full size guns, that people with smaller hands easily handle. The M&P's, Ruger SR's, some CZ's, and Sigs for example are easily manipulated by people with small hands. Often, the smaller a gun gets, the harder it is to use. But you'll need t find your own balance between concealability and function. Snubs are a great option as well but can also be a handful to shoot.

Anything you chose can be trained around though. Just take some classes and practice a lot.

Walk out of any gun shop if a sales person directs you to "guns for the ladies". They're all for the ladies. Your wrist can handle anything mine can and there are very few handguns the average female hand can't manipulate just as well as a man's hand. Decide on the features you want (DA/SA, striker, DAO, SAO, external safety, integral lock, mag disconnect, LCI, revolver, size, weight, etc) and then find a gun that fits your needs.
 
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