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Discussion Starter #1
You are sitting in the aisle seat on a 737. You notice a man that gets up and appears to be having an "urgent" or possibly "heated" conversation with an air waitress (flight attendant). The man has a Mid-Eastern accent. You notice as his jacket moves that he has a holstered pistol. You are flying in or around a major city.

What do you do?

1) Assume he is an Air Mashall?
2) Tackle the man
3) Talk to another flight attendant?
4) Other

For all of those that will reply:"I don't fly, I do not like TSA, I have not flown in years and never will fly again, I refuse to be groped will never board a plane again"..We gotcha! We understand the sentiment!.

No need to flood the thread with those replies :wink:
 

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I'll venture a guess, but I can't say with absolute certainty what I would do.

#1 - then begin a very fervent prayer that I am not wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is sort of a real scenario that sort of actually happened. I listen to ATC recordings when I get bored. There was one where an Air Marshall got taken off of a flight. Lots of confusion was going on possibly some procedures and protocols were not followed.

If the plane was actually in the air when this happened who knows what might have happened.
 

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If possible to do so without drawing attention I would attempt to quietly voice my concern to a member of the flight crew, then I would comply with instructions from the flight crew. Initiating action on my own could potentially cause adverse consequences such as panic reaction among the passengers or interfere with established procedures for dealing with in-flight emergencies.

Flight deck and cabin crews have been through just about every possible training scenario that anyone could devise. Whatever actions or reactions they have practiced would probably be seriously compromised by Joe Passenger interjecting himself into the situation.
 

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I would start out by discretely talking to the flight attendant after she was finished with her discussion with the gentleman.
If she assured me not to be concerned, he is the law. i am good to go.
If she was concerned about the firearm, I would watch him like a hawk and at the first sign of trouble go all spider monkey on him.
 

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You are sitting in the aisle seat on a 737. You notice a man that gets up and appears to be having an "urgent" or possibly "heated" conversation with an air waitress (flight attendant). The man has a Mid-Eastern accent. You notice as his jacket moves that he has a holstered pistol. You are flying in or around a major city.

What do you do?

1) Assume he is an Air Mashall?
2) Tackle the man
3) Talk to another flight attendant?
4) Other

For all of those that will reply:"I don't fly, I do not like TSA, I have not flown in years and never will fly again, I refuse to be groped will never board a plane again"..We gotcha! We understand the sentiment!.

No need to flood the thread with those replies :wink:
Chances are this person is not a threat.
A) pistol is holstered - criminals usually don't use holsters
B) pistol is holstered - not being used as a threat despite a heated discussion
C) while people have sneaked weapons onto flights before, is unlikely that this would be a holstered pistol that's loosely covered by a jacket.

I might listen to the conversation very attentively and plan for contingencies
 

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A. Checking to see if Chuck Norris & Lee Marvin are seated behind me.
B. Surreptitiously sneak up behind him, and take him out with the bottle of Canadian Maple Syrup I smuggled on the plane, from obviously lax screening methods.
C. When the stewardess come's to bring me "my 6th Bourbon on the rocks", mention I saw her last Saturday night in the octagon, taking out Rhonda Rousey, and she needs to apply a "rear naked choke" on the passenger in seat 7a.
D.Mind my own business, as from what I hear, air marshall's fly quite a bit, and this one need's an "upgraded concealment holster".
 

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The only people with holstered handguns on commercial flights are people who are allowed to have holstered handguns on commercial flights.
 

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I would start out by discretely talking to the flight attendant after she was finished with her discussion with the gentleman.
If she assured me not to be concerned, he is the law. i am good to go.
If she was concerned about the firearm, I would watch him like a hawk and at the first sign of trouble go all spider monkey on him.
If he was becoming "heated" I'd still watch him. Not all AM/LEO's are cut from the same cloth.
The problem is if he is a "compromised" AM/LEO, or not he could've been upset over a valid point, and you take any action you've just opened yourself up to a whole lot of problems. And you're next week is very liable to be confined in some manner.
This ain't a movie & I ain't Niam Leeson(I know his real name)!
 

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I've seen guns before. They just make me more alert. That's how I'd probably finish the flight along with being thankful that God drew me to His Son. Maybe if the moment allowed, start a conversation about handguns and that his had become exposed. There is not much else that could be done. If you tell a stewardess who knows what might happen. I haven't flown since about 6 trips back and forth to my senior trip in South East Asia full of other servicemen.
 

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From a realistic standpoint, I don't know whom is allowed to know the identity of air marshall's on flights. I know if I were an A.M., my rig would conceal my firearm from any potential threat, "TILL I PULLED IT TO USE IT"! This is the same type of scenario, as the "poorly concealed", when in some states IT MUST BE hidden from view. If A.M. is lazy, or won't purchase a rig which does conceal his hardware, what's the point? May as well O.C.
 

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I would give a note to a flight attendant. If she was not concerned, I would not be. At the very least, the LEO/AM might get some feedback that he is not concealing well enough. I also doubt a guy with a holstered gun would not be authorized. Now, if he was doing Mexican carry, that might be different.

Also, and I realize this is going off script, how would you want someone to react in a restaurant if they saw you were carrying? They might have the same fears you might have on the plane, justified or not. My point is I don't want to get into the liberal's game of getting all paranoid about people carrying firearms, anywhere.

I would worry a lot more if I saw someone with a box knife. And then of course there's the problem with snakes on the plane...don't get me started.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would give a note to a flight attendant. If she was not concerned, I would not be. At the very least, the LEO/AM might get some feedback that he is not concealing well enough. I also doubt a guy with a holstered gun would not be authorized. Now, if he was doing Mexican carry, that might be different.

Also, and I realize this is going off script, how would you want someone to react in a restaurant if they saw you were carrying? They might have the same fears you might have on the plane, justified or not. My point is I don't want to get into the liberal's game of getting all paranoid about people carrying firearms, anywhere.

I would worry a lot more if I saw someone with a box knife. And then of course there's the problem with snakes on the plane...don't get me started.
Those were my thoughts as well. A BG is not likely to be getting up and chatting with the flight attendant. If he was, it mostly go like this "I have a bomb and also my colleague has a bomb on this plane".

I would also let another flight attendant know to verify the guy and also to let him know that if I could see a gun, it might spook another passenger into doing something stupid.
 

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A gun in a holster is not as dangerous as a gun in a hand, even in a high-tension, high-stress environment like being crammed in an airliner. Having even a rudimentary situational understanding before shouting, "Let's Roll!" will likely keep the closely-penned herd from stampeding and screaming in the aisle. I like the suggestion of handing a note to one of the flight attendants about having seen the firearm as the calmest way to inform the attendant of one's concerns.
 

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I would give a note to a flight attendant. If she was not concerned, I would not be. At the very least, the LEO/AM might get some feedback that he is not concealing well enough. I also doubt a guy with a holstered gun would not be authorized. Now, if he was doing Mexican carry, that might be different.

Also, and I realize this is going off script, how would you want someone to react in a restaurant if they saw you were carrying? They might have the same fears you might have on the plane, justified or not. My point is I don't want to get into the liberal's game of getting all paranoid about people carrying firearms, anywhere.

I would worry a lot more if I saw someone with a box knife. And then of course there's the problem with snakes on the plane...don't get me started.
Sure, but it is legal in most places for us to carry in a restaurant.
It is highly unusual to see a firearm on a plane.
Think I would understandably be more concerned as you can't fly a restaurant into a building. (sarcasm)
 

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I would start out by discretely talking to the flight attendant after she was finished with her discussion with the gentleman.
If she assured me not to be concerned, he is the law. i am good to go.
If she was concerned about the firearm, I would watch him like a hawk and at the first sign of trouble go all spider monkey on him.
If you're gonna go monkey on him, I suggest you go gorilla instead. Monkeys generally bite and throw feces at you, not rip arms out of sockets.
 

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Sure, but it is legal in most places for us to carry in a restaurant.
It is highly unusual to see a firearm on a plane.
Think I would understandably be more concerned as you can't fly a restaurant into a building. (sarcasm)
All I'm saying is that it is about perception. Someone in a restaurant could easily be just as concerned about dying as someone on a plane, justified or not in either case. A person in a restaurant could pull the gun and just start shooting people and that has happened. Patrons could wind up just as dead as if they were flown into a building.

One of the bad things about flying is like it or not, right or wrong, once you get on an airliner, safety and security is pretty much out of your hands except for following instructions. That is how the whole system is designed. There are extreme exceptions, like passengers who intervene in egregious situations, but those are very rare and those passengers do so with no authority and at their own risk. For the most part, you are a warm body to be transported. Your opinion and your judgement carries almost no weight on any topic to those in charge.

I am a multi-million mile frequent flyer, but for those reasons, I refuse to fly now.
 
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