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Discussion Starter #1
According to the ATF, a revolver is not a pistol.
Washington State issues a Concealed Pistol License, not a Concealed Weapons License.
Wondering if a Wa. State Concealed Pistol License holder carrying a concealed revolver would be breaking the law.
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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds like a Washington problem sorry Rambler I think most on here are ready for the Great North West to fall into the Pacific.
Fine with me, I can swim. Don't get too smug though, 20 some years ago you'd never think in a million years this place would be what it is. All it takes is a few californians and a few new yorkers and before you know it the disease spreads faster than any corona virus ever did.
 

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A revolver has one or more integral chambers that align with the bore, barrel.
A revolver is a handgun.
A pistol is a handgun.
A pistol is not a revolver.
Anyway, pistol > revolver 😈
 

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From Washington Firearm Laws, Summary 2018
Washington law defines pistol as any firearm with a barrel less than sixteen inches in length, or designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand.
This is a Washington license. Check Washington laws.

It does appear that an SBR fits Washington pistol definition. Therefore, it could be carried concealed under the Washington pistol license. Also, an AR with a pistol brace and 20" barrel could qualify as a pistol.
 

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Sounds like Washington could be in violation of ATF regs and, as some folks think, the ATF is in violation of anything that makes sense.
 
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People here are right in saying that the OP should consult WA law. Those two citations are from federal law and would have no bearing on carrying in Washington, unless there was an overriding federal law. USC means "United States Code" and CFR means "Code of Federal Regulations" and the wording in the OP is specifically from 27 CFR 478.11. The other citation, 18 USC 921 (A) (29) has a different wording.

Washington law says: A "firearm" is defined as a weapon or device from which a projectile or projectiles may be fired by an explosive such as gunpowder. ... a "pistol" is any firearm with a barrel less than sixteen inches in length, or designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand. So that would seem to include revolvers also.
 

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People here are right in saying that the OP should consult WA law. Those two citations are from federal law and would have no bearing on carrying in Washington, unless there was an overriding federal law. USC means "United States Code" and CFR means "Code of Federal Regulations" and the wording in the OP is specifically from 27 CFR 478.11. The other citation, 18 USC 921 (A) (29) has a different wording.

Washington law says: A "firearm" is defined as a weapon or device from which a projectile or projectiles may be fired by an explosive such as gunpowder. ... a "pistol" is any firearm with a barrel less than sixteen inches in length, or designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand. So that would seem to include revolvers also.
Not trying to be difficult but I thought modern smokeless powder was not considered an explosive. Black powder on the other hand is which is why there are different storage requirements for dealers. If that's the case should everyone be carrying black powder weapons??
 

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Not trying to be difficult but I thought modern smokeless powder was not considered an explosive. Black powder on the other hand is which is why there are different storage requirements for dealers. If that's the case should everyone be carrying black powder weapons??
You have to go by the definitions provided in a certain section of the law. A lot of laws will preface something like "...for the purposes of this section, "X" means THIS. You can't use a definition used for storage requirements for dealers to mean the same thing as a requirement for sales, manufacture or carry, unless both are part of the same subdivision of law.

Also, some experts define smokeless power as a "low explosive." It will produce an "explosion" if confined, as in a cartridge, even though it would only burn if not confined. The same is true of gasoline. It will not explode if unconfined, but if you put it together in the right mixture with air in a car cylinder and ignite it, it produces a controlled explosion.

Short answer: You are splitting hairs in a way that is irrelevant.
 

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The same is true of gasoline. It will not explode if unconfined, but if you put it together in the right mixture with air in a car cylinder and ignite it, it produces a controlled explosion.
Not exactly. Ask a firefighter.

 

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@riverrambler Sorry...I really tried, but the opportunity was too good to pass up!!!

THIS is a pistol (according to almost everybody).

335039
 

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Not exactly. Ask a firefighter.
We had to learn all about that in shipboard firefighting school in the Navy. What a firefighter should tell me if I asked is that liquid gasoline itself is not explosive. Gasoline vapor, which is a gasoline/air mixture, is explosive, which was my exact point about in post #12.

Gasoline vapor is what you see exploding in the video. This is easily proven by observation. After the explosion in the video, which is caused by the vapor being contained in a closed space, there is still gasoline burning. If liquid gasoline were a true explosive, it all would have exploded at once and there would be none left to burn.

In fact, purely liquid gasoline is not even flammable. If you were to put gasoline in a perfectly sealed container, get absolutely all the oxygen out of the container, and then introduce a spark, nothing would happen. If you got gasoline below - 40 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature at which gasoline will vaporize and introduced a spark, it would, in theory, not even burn.

There was a great episode ending on the TV show "The Mentalist" where a criminal was unable to escape capture at a gas station because he didn't understand the difference.
 

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I don't know what the Navy taught you, but this is patently untrue..."It will not explode if unconfined" for the simple reason that all gasoline whether confined or unconfined gives off vapors. That is why you can smell gasoline. The only way to prevent vapors is to constrain the liquid with an inert gas or foam.

None of that has much to do with the topic...so carry on.
 

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Pistol, revolver...

To me, it's a distinction without a difference. Both are handguns. I see revolvers as a specific subset of pistols.
 

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