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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious what everyone is using for a carry flashlight? I'd like one that is bright, obviously, not blinding but bright enough to see especially since I'll prolly use it for situations unrelated to self defense like walking from my tractor at night after work over to the truck so of course I want a bright light. Would also like one that comes with a pocket clip and is small enough to pocket carry. Asked around on a just a flashlight forum and everyone there said to get a Zebralight SC63 1300 lumens 2.2 hours on a 18650 battery, now idk what small flashlights usually cost but $79 seems pretty high for a little flashlight. Or that might be right on the money, flashlights don't fall in or even near my field of expertise.

SC63 18650 XHP35 Flashlight Cool White



LED: Cree XHP35 Cool White (Nominal CCT 5700K)
User Selectable Levels: 3 main levels (High, Medium and Low). Each main level can be programmed to one of its two sub-levels. The second sub-level of the each main levels can be further programmed to different brightness levels.
Light Output (runtimes)
High: H1 1300 Lm (PID, approx 2.2 hr) or H2 670 Lm (PID, 2.8 hr)/360 Lm (4.3 hr)/160 Lm (12 hr)
Medium: M1 70 Lm (33 hrs) or M2 32 Lm (73 hrs)/12 Lm (8 days)
Low: L1 3.8 Lm (18 days) or L2 0.43 Lm (2.8 months)/0.06 Lm (5.1 months)/0.01 Lm (7.1 months)
Beacon Strobe Mode: 0.2Hz Beacon at Low / 0.2Hz Beacon at H1 / 4Hz Strobe at H1 / 19Hz Strobe at H1
Operating Voltage Range: 2.7V - 6.0V
Battery: One 18650 size (i.e. unprotected, 65.0-65.2 mm long) 3.6-4.35V li-ion rechargeable. Batteries are not included in the package.
Parasitic Drain: Negligible (much less than the self discharging of a battery)
Beam Type
80 degree spill
12 degree hot spot
Dimensions
Head Diameter: 0.96 inch (24.5 mm)
Length: 3.64 inch (92.5 mm)
Weight
1.3 oz (38 gram) without battery
Features
PID thermal regulated outputs (two highest output levels) using 384 internal brightness levels and a calibrated 0.1C resolution temperature sensor.
Builtin battery discharging protections with continuously monitored temperature, current, and voltage, plus a (2.7V) low voltage cutoff
Battery capacity indicator (LED flashes 1-4 times, 4 short clicks to start)
Automatic stepping down from High to Medium, and from Medium to Low when battery capacity is low
Durable electronic soft-touch switch
Smart user interface provides fast and easy access to all brightness levels and beacon-strobes.
Precision machined unibody casing from premium grade aluminum bar stocks
Proprietary heat sinking design bonds the LED board directly to the unibody aluminum casing
Durable natural hard anodized finish (Type III Class I)
Sealed and potted LED driver circuitry
Tempered optical grade glass
Orange peel textured reflector
Battery reverse polarity protection
Pre-installed pocket clip
Waterproof to IPX7 (2 meters, 30 minutes)
Operations

This light has 3 main levels (High, Medium, and Low) and a beacon-strobe mode. Each main level can be programmed to one of its two sub-levels. The second sub-level of each main levels can be further programmed to different brightness levels.

Basic Operation
One short-click turns on the light to High or turns off the light.
Two short-click turns on the light to Medium.
Three short-click turns on the light to the beacon-strobe mode.
Press and hold (for over 0.6 seconds) turns on the light to Low and then Medium and High. Release at the desired level.
Advanced Operation and Configuration
Press and hold to cycle from Low, Medium and High, release at the desired level to set. When press and hold, the light always cycle from Low to High regardless which level you are currently in.
Double click to toggle and select between the two sub-levels for that main level. Sub-level selections for the 3 main levels are memorized after the light is turned off and through battery changes.
The second sub-level (H2, M2 and L2) of each main levels can be further programmed to different brightness levels. At a main level, double-click 6 times to start configuration. On subsequent double-clicks the light will cycle through different brightness levels. Short click to turn off the light when finishing configurations. The selections for the second sub-levels are memorized after the light is turned off and through battery changes.
This light uses the main LED (flashing 1 to 4 times) to indicate the estimated remaining capacity of the battery. To start the battery indicator, (from Off) short-click 4 times without pause.
Beacon-strobe mode can be accessed from 3 short-clicks when the light is Off. Once in the beacon-strobe mode, you can double-click to cycle through different types of beacons and strobes. Beacon-strobe settings are memorized when the light is turned off and through battery changes.
 

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Just boarded a flight from San Diego to Driver- clipped to my pocket is a Pelican 2350 (1xAA, 100 lumen).
 

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Streamlight fan also.



The ProTac2AA (top in pic) gets used everyday I work and it has survived a lot of abuse. Drops from 6' and it was submerged in a foot of water for 15min before I could get to it, still works. Earlier today it took a trip down some steel steps.

It has a hi, strobe, and low setting. If I use the low on rotating equipment it acts like a strobe. I discovered that by accident, but it is useful in my line of work.

The ProTac2L is a great light also. It gets carried as much as the 2AA but used much less. I am on the same battery for just over a year. I like it because it is smaller and brighter than the 2AA. I use the 2AA at work because although it is my personal light, they will supply the batteries. There are times I go through a set in a 12hr shift.

I've been very happy with both.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I looked at all these and the prices are cheaper which I like and they seem to take aa or aaa batts which I like also compared to the one I shared, however the one I showed is up to 1300 lumen where as most of these are 100-300 lumen. Are those enough lumens to be a "do it all" flashlight when I'm carrying it?
 

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Fenix PD35 TAC. Has both a "tactical" (I hate that word) mode and an "outdoorsy/camping" mode. Uber stupid bright when it needs to be, and the lowest setting lasts forever it seems...
 

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Surefire. 320/15 lumens. I have brighter lights but this is my go to for edc pocket carry. I would like to eventually pick up a Surefire intellabeam 600 lumen light but I have other things higher up in my priority ladder.
 

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Technology has advanced so much, it allows you to think outside the box- take a look at the Ultratac K18. It is tiny, but throws 360 lumens. I used to carry a big fat Fenix or Klarus, but downsized and won't go back. Super light, AAA, can hang it on a keychain or throw in a pocket. Cheap, awesome, will blow your mind how much light can come out of such a tiny light. And only $20. Everyone should have at least one . . .
https://www.amazon.com/GranVela-Keychain-Flashlight-Waterproof-Portable/dp/B01BS88Z72
 

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I just bought one of these. Very expensive, but really like the ergonomics and the feature set.
T-MAX_LE_048tmc.jpg
 

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I found out the other day that those cartridges that take three AAA batteries are interchangeable in a lot of flashlights. If you have a good one that has a corroded contact just take one out of a $1 W.M. light they are all the same. I think that if the Ultrafire T-6 was any brighter it would be against the law to shine it at the space station.
 

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I looked at all these and the prices are cheaper which I like and they seem to take aa or aaa batts which I like also compared to the one I shared, however the one I showed is up to 1300 lumen where as most of these are 100-300 lumen. Are those enough lumens to be a "do it all" flashlight when I'm carrying it?
I think the less expensive lights have a different purpose than one with 1300 lumen. You shinen deer?

I have Coast that was less than $40. Not sure of the lumen but it keeps track of my wild dogs running the back yard for bunnies.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I think the less expensive lights have a different purpose than one with 1300 lumen. You shinen deer?

I have Coast that was less than $40. Not sure of the lumen but it keeps track of my wild dogs running the back yard for bunnies.

I've never paid attention to lumens before really honestly the only time I'll need bright bright light is when I quit on those late nights on the farm and have to walk to the truck. Just to shine to the truck and spot the occasional coyote's noseing around. Typically I try to park close but sometimes I park a good football field lengths away or further
 

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Also take into consideration how focused the beam is. Not sure my Coast will be real effective at 100 yards but it does cast light that far. I have a MyTorch that has some fancy battery and a narrower beam that works better at long range, maybe 200+ L

Also beware of big claims from lights aren't big dollars.
 
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