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Older vintage/classic pistols are...

  • ...great! I mostly own them and enjoy using them the most.

    Votes: 24 47.1%
  • ...OK. I have a few or will be considering getting several.

    Votes: 20 39.2%
  • ...not interesting to me. I only own and use current/recent pistols.

    Votes: 7 13.7%

  • Total voters
    51
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Discussion Starter #1
Currently I am not liking just about all of the new firearms that are released in recent years so now my focus has shifted to adding older firearms to my collection that were released in the past. Here are 2 vintage pistols that I just acquired.

1987 CZ-75 (pre B model) 9mm pistol. The story behind this pistol is that it was part of a shipment of CZ-75 pistols that were purchased by Israel and used by LEO's there in the late 80's until just recently. They were taken out of service and imported to the US for sale here. This one I have was media blasted, trigger and barrel polished, springs replaced, and then completely refinished. It looks like its brand new and I got a lot of compliments about it when I went to go pick it up.



1985 Beretta 92F 9mm pistol. This is the model that was out before the popular 92FS was available. I am collecting the main full size service pistol out of every primary 92 model that was released since they came out back in 1976. After getting this 92F I only have one more model to get to complete my collection.

 

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Older guns are interesting, but not something I want to spend money on.
I'm the opposite. Of course I have plenty of modern guns and there are still a few I would like but I just love the older ones.
Some favorites that I would never trade for a newer version are my 1965 S&W Model 28, 1958 Browning A5 Light 12, pre firing pin safety Colt Combat Commander, M1 Garand, Winchester 88 in .243, etc. Those are all unavailable as new or not the same as a new model. Yeah, they are old but none perform any less than the new versions. I happen to think the older craftsmanship is better, compare a new A5 to the older Belgian ones. The way I see it is I get a little history, firearms that are functional and the values increase.

Like i said, plenty of new firearms as well and I enjoy those too.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Older guns are interesting, but not something I want to spend money on.
That's understandable. Years ago I would rarely consider getting one that was not current and new in box. :biggrin2:
 

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I like a lot of older guns and have owned a bunch but, if I was being honest I think the older revolvers have a lot going for them but, I appreciate the new semi autos for what I use them for which is carry for self defense.
My favorite 9mm was the S&W 3914 I owned and carried a few years but, the Walther PPS beats it for carry comfort and ease of putting bullets on target which is the whole point of me carrying a gun. I have to acknowledge that as much as I don't appreciate polymer pistols they are better for what I use a gun for. I cut my teeth on DA/SA steel firearms and I won't carry one today or a 1911 (another favorite pistol). I don't want anything but point and shoot today so no safeties or decockers for me anymore.
Today I did a lot of moving drills with the Glock 21. Yeah, plastic, ugly and no soul but, in a gun fight its the first gun I would grab in the safe. 14 rounds of reliable,soft shooting 45 is not something my Grandfather ever got to see.
Nostalgia and appreciation of craftsmanship are things I value but, I don't carry a gun for any of those reasons.
While we can admire the guns of the past I can guarantee you that if you gave those boys landing on Omaha beach a choice between a full size Glock or their 1911's as a sidearm they would not make their choice based on nostalgia.
 

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My personal preference is for classic and vintage firearms. There is very little on the market today that interests me (especially the plastic-fantastic toys everyone seems to be going for now). I own fully functional firearms made before the US Civil War, several cartridge weapons from pre-1900, and quite a few from WW1 and WW2 production. I own modern firearms that are over 40 years old and have never been fired with factory ammunition, only my own loads.

I am perfectly comfortable relying on carry pieces that are between 30 and 60 years old. Probably the most recent defensive handgun I have purchased is a Sig P229 made in 1992. Since a bout of surgeries (shoulder, elbow, wrist, cataracts) I have been relying on a 1979-production Smith & Wesson Model 64 .38 Special 2" round-butt that started out as a police department issue piece, and still works just as well as it did when brand new. Shot my annual LEOSA-SB218 qualification with it last year, scored over 90% (with bifocals).

One of the loud-mouths at my club was always insisting that GI-issue .45 pistols were not capable of any accuracy. I took a 1944 production Remington-Rand M1911A-1 pistol and a box of FC-1963 ball ammo to the range and shot a 205 (possible 210) on a B27 silhouette with 21 rounds at 50 feet. Followed that up with a 1918-vintage Colt M1911 using FA-1918 ammo, shot 21 rounds inside the 8-ring at 50 feet. (Our indoor range is only 50-feet in length). The criticism seems to have stopped after a 100 year old pistol and 100 year old ammunition took the center out of a silhouette target.

The only dangers existing for fine firearms are rust and politicians.
 

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MMinSC and m5215, I guess the issue for me with older guns are several. 1) I have only been shooting firearms seriously for the last 12 years so my focus has been finding guns that work for me for self-defense and hunting 2) I don't have the time with firearms to know and fully appreciate what older guns are worth owning and that I would enjoy shooting, and 3) rather than put all of my disposable income into firearms, much of it goes into hunting, i.e., gear, clothing, tags, hunts, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One of the loud-mouths at my club was always insisting that GI-issue .45 pistols were not capable of any accuracy.
That person at your club made a very naive statement. While 1911's are not one of my preferred pistols I would not claim they have a lack of accuracy. Certainly your demonstration proved that they are quite accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
MMinSC and m5215, I guess the issue for me with older guns are several. 1) I have only been shooting firearms seriously for the last 12 years so my focus has been finding guns that work for me for self-defense and hunting 2) I don't have the time with firearms to know and fully appreciate what older guns are worth owning and that I would enjoy shooting, and 3) rather than put all of my disposable income into firearms, much of it goes into hunting, i.e., gear, clothing, tags, hunts, etc.
That makes sense to me. We all have our preferences on what we get and how we spend our free time. I don't do any hunting so I have no money and no free time allocated for that. That gives me the resources and time to acquire and use the firearms I have.
 

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I like old stuff too, and think manufacturing and materials of the old stuff in terms of workmanship is superior, BUT as far as them being what I consider “better”, I’d want it proven out that that 1970s revolver has the long term durability and dependability of say a Glock 17. That would be the question I’d need answered to say one is better than the other for the purposes I find most important in a self defense firearm. Now for collecting, that’s a different story.


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My first handgun at age 14 was already over 50 years old when my family acquired it. I was excited about new gun designs until the early 2000's, when the industry turned into a polystriker love fest.
 

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I have guns that were either bought before there was good government record keeping or can't be traced to me at all. So hanging on to old guns keeps my small collection off of anyone's radar. Those are still great guns. They were the best of their day. The potential defense targets today are no different than they were back then. Those guns can still get the job done.
 

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The closest I can come is an old design, new manufacture. . Wilson Combat! I do have two hair loombs from my dad, both 22's. He wasn't much of a gun person.
 

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I agree with some of the other posters. This is kind of a multi layered question. Do I like older guns/older designs? Yes. Are they "better" than new guns? No. Are they more "durable" than newer guns, in a practical sense? No. Do older guns have their place in collections and range time? Yes. Does fondling a big chunk of beautiful Browning metal make me feel really awesome? Yes. Would I want to carry a 32oz gun inside my belt? No. Does that make me less manly? Probably.

So the answer is of course they all have their place and I like them all.
 
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