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Discussion Starter #1
So I got my new holster a few days ago and I started practicing drawing from it. (Whitehat Maxtuck. Love it!)

Now, from what I've been told (remember I'm still somewhat new to the defensive carry part of the gun world), drawing is a three step process: (1) grip on the weapon; (2) draw to low-ready; (3) extend hands straight to firing position. Of course, that's a best case scenario, and that brings up my question.

So far, I've found myself fingering the trigger at low-ready, and then pulling it to the breaking point as I extend my arms. But is that right? If someone is rushing me, I might have to literally take a hip shot. Would it be better to finger the trigger as soon as it clears the holster? I admit that I'm a little worried about muscle memory and safety in that I'd be afraid I'd do it every time, even when I'm drawing to disarm at night, or to clean the weapon, etc.

So, when do you make contact with the trigger in your progression? And when do you pull to the breaking point?
 

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I don't touch the trigger until I make the decision to shoot. That can come at any time I decide. Just because I draw doesn't mean that my finger goes on the trigger.
 

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I've found myself fingering the trigger at low-ready...
IMHO, that is one DANGEROUS habit. I've never included trigger contact as part of the "muscle memory" exercise of pistol presentation. I want the "touch/press" to always be a completely conscious decision. If it costs me a few tenths of a second, that suits me fine.
 

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In a defensive situation, your fine motor skills are nonexistent. What you are doing sounds to me like an excellent way to shoot yourself in the leg or send a round in an inadvertent direction. My trigger finger remains outside of the trigger guard, parallel to the barrel, pointing at the target until my arms are at full extension.
 

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Personally I've never heard of anyone teaching anything about drawing to a low ready position. Every class I've ever attended always taught to draw to your firing position. You may not fire, and I've done drills where sometimes you got the command to 'gun' and sometimes you didn't, but you always drew to a firing position. I've also done drills that amount to doing just what you were thinking about, drawing and firing from the hip. I was basically taught to get your elbow locked into your side and you keep your weak hand up tight on your chest. This is obviously a very close quarters thing, nothing you'd attempt from 10 yards or anything like that.
 

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I don't touch the trigger until I make the decision to shoot. That can come at any time I decide. Just because I draw doesn't mean that my finger goes on the trigger.
I agree with this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't touch the trigger until I make the decision to shoot. That can come at any time I decide. Just because I draw doesn't mean that my finger goes on the trigger.
IMHO, that is one DANGEROUS habit. I've never included trigger contact as part of the "muscle memory" exercise of pistol presentation. I want the "touch/press" to always be a completely conscious decision. If it costs me a few tenths of a second, that suits me fine.
Finger on the trigger once you have acquired your target in your sights and have decided to destroy the target.
I've gone with the idea that I'm not drawing unless I've already decided that I am in the clear, and have reason to pull the trigger. Granted, it's still a choice I have whether to actually pull it or not, but I'd rather keep it in the holster unless I'm going to pull the trigger.

That very well may change, but it's the reasoning I've been operating on up to this point.


Personally I've never heard of anyone teaching anything about drawing to a low ready position. Every class I've ever attended always taught to draw to your firing position. You may not fire, and I've done drills where sometimes you got the command to 'gun' and sometimes you didn't, but you always drew to a firing position. I've also done drills that amount to doing just what you were thinking about, drawing and firing from the hip. I was basically taught to get your elbow locked into your side and you keep your weak hand up tight on your chest. This is obviously a very close quarters thing, nothing you'd attempt from 10 yards or anything like that.
What I was told was that basically, when you come to low ready, that's where you're hands meet and then you go straight out to your firing position. There's no stopping at Low-ready. It's a way to stop the person from acting like their fishing and casting a line, or bowling.
---


Keep the comments coming please, it's definitely giving me something to think about.
 

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"When do you touch the trigger?"

You just know when the time is right... When the intensity is at its peak... When your senses are heightened... When... oh wait, you're referring to a trigger on a pistol...
 
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I've gone with the idea that I'm not drawing unless I've already decided that I am in the clear, and have reason to pull the trigger. Granted, it's still a choice I have whether to actually pull it or not, but I'd rather keep it in the holster unless I'm going to pull the trigger.
In my opinion, when you have made the decision to draw and why, doesn't really matter. What matters is the bolded part above.
Please don't paractice drawing with your finger on the trigger.
Please practice drawing straight to fireing position with your finger off of the trigger, then when you decide to shoot, you finger goes on the trigger.
 

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Furthermore, If you feel that you should practice drawing to "low ready", you have not made the decision to shoot and still, please keep your finger off of the trigger. Present the gun to fireing position with your finger off of the trigger, and when you have made the final decision is when it goes on the trigger.
 

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What I was told was that basically, when you come to low ready, that's where you're hands meet and then you go straight out to your firing position. There's no stopping at Low-ready. It's a way to stop the person from acting like their fishing and casting a line, or bowling.
Ah, OK. I think I got confused because, IMO, if you are drawing to extension, there is no other "position", because you aren't stopping or pausing. I got the impression that you were drawing to that position as some sort of definitive staging point where your pistol stopped, which is where my comment came from.

In that case, my finger is on the trigger the moment I know I'm going to be firing, so it could be as my pistol is in the final part of my extension or it could stay indexed along the slide if I'm in threat mode but not shoot mode. Either way, I wouldn't put it on the trigger until the pistol was pointed in the direction of the threat.
 

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I think it's very important to practice drawing various positions and holding fire and finger out. There are a lot of scenarios where you may need these skills. In drills we put together it stopped a lot of friendly fire on the non threats that were shuffled randomly to trick the shooter.
 

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OK my great uncle was a town Marshal in the late 40s and he had to hire a Deputy to complete the department, 122 people lived in the town. The young man he hired needed training as he had same problem as you. He made the new guy go get a tongue depresser and he made it the same length as his trigger finger and taped it to his finger and after several days problem solved
 

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If the situation calls for it, I have no problem with putting your finger on the trigger at low ready and as soon as the gun is level, pull away... you could prob get 2 or 3 to the torso and 1 to the head by the time you are fully extended.
 

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I agree with what all have said, too much can happen when you put your finger on the trigger, be safe.
 
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Putting your finger on the trigger while drawing will most likely eventually result in an inadvertent shot. This could be disastrous. I never put my finger on the trigger until I have the gun out of the holster, on the target, and have made the decision to shoot. Obviously in a critical situation, this time would be very short, but it is a process I try to always train myself to go through.
 
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